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By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | August 22, 1999
FORT KNOX, Ky. -- On 26 acres in the middle of this Army post, work crews are putting the finishing touches on a mock town of 22 pastel-colored buildings, painting the walls, paving the roads, stringing electrical wire and landscaping the grounds.Then will come the armored invasion, when the Army begins to use this state-of-the-art training area to teach tank units how to fight in an urban center.As the training area is envisioned by its creators, computerized technology borrowed from amusement parks will provide the sounds, sights and surprises that tankers and Bradley fighting vehicle crews could expect in a hostile city.
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NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun and Baltimore Sun reporter | May 16, 2011
Clare C. McNiff, a career educator who retired from the Maryland State Department of Education, died May 8 of cancer at Encore at Turf Valley Assisted Living in Ellicott City. She was 69. Clare C. O'Rourke, the daughter of a bank investigator and an office manager, was born and raised in Providence, R.I. She was a 1959 graduate of St. Mary's Academy Bay View High School in East Providence. Mrs. McNiff was a 1963 graduate of Rhode Island College where she earned a bachelor's degree in education.
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NEWS
By Richard A. Serrano and Richard A. Serrano,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | June 17, 2003
FORT KNOX, Ky. - Two military officers testified yesterday that a man resembling Army Sgt. Asan Akbar warned that their unit was under attack moments before allegedly rolling grenades into headquarters tents in Kuwait in the early days of the war against Iraq in March. The testimony came during the first day of a weeklong preliminary hearing that will determine whether Akbar, 32, a native of Los Angeles, will be tried before a general court-martial. Army prosecutors contend that Akbar struck out against the military by also hurling grenades and shooting at soldiers as they fled from the burning tents.
SPORTS
By BILL ORDINE | August 13, 2008
More than three decades ago, Mark Spitz was the American super-athlete with enough gold hanging around his neck to qualify him for his own safety deposit box at Fort Knox. Today, the former swimming star, 58, who captured seven golds at the 1972 Summer Games in Munich sounds a little curmudgeonly as he complains that no one has invited him to Beijing to preside as the swimming god emeritus while Michael Phelps carries the standard for America. "I never got invited," Spitz was quoted as saying.
NEWS
By Bob Erlandson and Bob Erlandson,SUN STAFF | March 7, 1996
After an 18-year legal battle, a former Army sergeant has been awarded $400,577 because Army and CIA scientists at Edgewood Arsenal gave him LSD as part of a secret research project.The award, on a 2-1 vote by an arbitration panel this week, is the maximum allowed by a private claims bill that Congress passed in 1994 to redress this case."I'm the little guy who fought City Hall and finally won," James B. Stanley said yesterday from his home in Palm Springs, Fla.According to court documents, the hallucinogenic drug altered Mr. Stanley's personality, leading to the decline of his once-bright military career, and helped wreck his first marriage.
SPORTS
By BILL ORDINE | August 13, 2008
More than three decades ago, Mark Spitz was the American super-athlete with enough gold hanging around his neck to qualify him for his own safety deposit box at Fort Knox. Today, the former swimming star, 58, who captured seven golds at the 1972 Summer Games in Munich sounds a little curmudgeonly as he complains that no one has invited him to Beijing to preside as the swimming god emeritus while Michael Phelps carries the standard for America. "I never got invited," Spitz was quoted as saying.
TOPIC
By G. Jefferson Price III | August 8, 2004
"Bait and switch" is one of the oldest techniques in the book for disreputable merchants trying to lure customers to their stores. The merchant advertises an item at an unbelievably low price. That's the bait. It could be anything from a car to a TV set. But when the customer arrives in the store, the advertised item is no longer in stock, and the merchant sets about trying to persuade the customer to buy a more expensive model that just happens to be in stock. That's the switch. And it's illegal.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun and Baltimore Sun reporter | May 16, 2011
Clare C. McNiff, a career educator who retired from the Maryland State Department of Education, died May 8 of cancer at Encore at Turf Valley Assisted Living in Ellicott City. She was 69. Clare C. O'Rourke, the daughter of a bank investigator and an office manager, was born and raised in Providence, R.I. She was a 1959 graduate of St. Mary's Academy Bay View High School in East Providence. Mrs. McNiff was a 1963 graduate of Rhode Island College where she earned a bachelor's degree in education.
NEWS
By Thomas L. Friedman | December 23, 2003
ISTANBUL, Turkey - If we ever run out of room to store our gold in Fort Knox, I know just the place to put it: the new U.S. Consulate in Istanbul. It looks just like Fort Knox - without the charm. The U.S. Consulate used to be in the heart of the city, where it was easy for Turks to pop in for a visa or to use the library. For security reasons, though, it was recently moved 45 minutes away to the outskirts of Istanbul, on a bluff overlooking the Bosporus - surrounded by a tall wall. The new consulate looks like a maximum-security prison.
NEWS
By Fred Rasmussen and Fred Rasmussen,Sun Staff Writer | February 2, 1995
Patricia Boulay Brack, whose struggle against breast cancer and its effect on her family was the subject of a book she wrote with a son, died Monday of complications from cancer at her White Hall residence. She was 53.Mrs. Brack lost one breast to cancer in 1985 and the other in 1989.For the book, "Moms Don't Get Sick," which was published in 1990, she kept detailed journals through her surgeries, chemotherapy sessions and recovery while her son Benjamin taped his impressions of events.They started work on the book in 1985 when Benjamin was 10."
TOPIC
By G. Jefferson Price III | August 8, 2004
"Bait and switch" is one of the oldest techniques in the book for disreputable merchants trying to lure customers to their stores. The merchant advertises an item at an unbelievably low price. That's the bait. It could be anything from a car to a TV set. But when the customer arrives in the store, the advertised item is no longer in stock, and the merchant sets about trying to persuade the customer to buy a more expensive model that just happens to be in stock. That's the switch. And it's illegal.
NEWS
By Thomas L. Friedman | December 23, 2003
ISTANBUL, Turkey - If we ever run out of room to store our gold in Fort Knox, I know just the place to put it: the new U.S. Consulate in Istanbul. It looks just like Fort Knox - without the charm. The U.S. Consulate used to be in the heart of the city, where it was easy for Turks to pop in for a visa or to use the library. For security reasons, though, it was recently moved 45 minutes away to the outskirts of Istanbul, on a bluff overlooking the Bosporus - surrounded by a tall wall. The new consulate looks like a maximum-security prison.
NEWS
By Richard A. Serrano and Richard A. Serrano,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | June 17, 2003
FORT KNOX, Ky. - Two military officers testified yesterday that a man resembling Army Sgt. Asan Akbar warned that their unit was under attack moments before allegedly rolling grenades into headquarters tents in Kuwait in the early days of the war against Iraq in March. The testimony came during the first day of a weeklong preliminary hearing that will determine whether Akbar, 32, a native of Los Angeles, will be tried before a general court-martial. Army prosecutors contend that Akbar struck out against the military by also hurling grenades and shooting at soldiers as they fled from the burning tents.
NEWS
By Rona Kobell and Rona Kobell,SUN STAFF | April 26, 2003
As he travels the desert with the 3rd Infantry Division in Iraq, Tiny Heath is missing a lot at home. The private first class has missed putting his hand on the belly of his wife, now six months' pregnant, and feeling the baby kick. He missed hearing the heartbeat for the first time. Last month, he missed an important genetic test his wife had to take alone. In a few days, he'll have missed the sonogram and their first wedding anniversary. And if he stays away until August, he'll miss the birth of their first child.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | August 22, 1999
FORT KNOX, Ky. -- On 26 acres in the middle of this Army post, work crews are putting the finishing touches on a mock town of 22 pastel-colored buildings, painting the walls, paving the roads, stringing electrical wire and landscaping the grounds.Then will come the armored invasion, when the Army begins to use this state-of-the-art training area to teach tank units how to fight in an urban center.As the training area is envisioned by its creators, computerized technology borrowed from amusement parks will provide the sounds, sights and surprises that tankers and Bradley fighting vehicle crews could expect in a hostile city.
NEWS
By Bob Erlandson and Bob Erlandson,SUN STAFF | March 7, 1996
After an 18-year legal battle, a former Army sergeant has been awarded $400,577 because Army and CIA scientists at Edgewood Arsenal gave him LSD as part of a secret research project.The award, on a 2-1 vote by an arbitration panel this week, is the maximum allowed by a private claims bill that Congress passed in 1994 to redress this case."I'm the little guy who fought City Hall and finally won," James B. Stanley said yesterday from his home in Palm Springs, Fla.According to court documents, the hallucinogenic drug altered Mr. Stanley's personality, leading to the decline of his once-bright military career, and helped wreck his first marriage.
BUSINESS
By Jay Hancock | November 13, 1995
IF YOU HAVE an adjustable mortgage, you should heckle Alan Greenspan the next time you see him."Hey Greenspan," you should yell, "why is the funds target 500 basis points over the implicit GDP deflator?" That'll get his attention. "Your mother's a Keynesian," you can add.If you have shares in a money-market mutual fund, you should kiss Mr. Greenspan. If you have both the mortgage and the fund, you should drape your arm on his shoulder, murmur about the burdens of monetary power and marvel at how bank problems in Japan can boost Marylanders' MasterCard payments.
BUSINESS
By Jay Hancock | November 13, 1995
IF YOU HAVE an adjustable mortgage, you should heckle Alan Greenspan the next time you see him."Hey Greenspan," you should yell, "why is the funds target 500 basis points over the implicit GDP deflator?" That'll get his attention. "Your mother's a Keynesian," you can add.If you have shares in a money-market mutual fund, you should kiss Mr. Greenspan. If you have both the mortgage and the fund, you should drape your arm on his shoulder, murmur about the burdens of monetary power and marvel at how bank problems in Japan can boost Marylanders' MasterCard payments.
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