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SPORTS
By Peter Baker and Peter Baker,SUN STAFF | September 27, 1998
Among the special managed hunts on state lands during deer seasons this year are sessions at Fort Frederick State Park in Washington County and Wye Island Natural Resources Management Area near Queenstown on the Eastern Shore.Fort Frederick will be open Dec. 8-10 for shotgun hunters only, and Wye Island will be open for portions of both bow and muzzleloader seasons. The Wye Island bow dates are Oct. 10 through Nov. 25, excluding Sundays, which are closed to hunting in Maryland.At Wye Island, as many as 25 bow hunters per day may sign in at the NRMA during bow hunting dates.
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NEWS
By Candus Thomson, The Baltimore Sun | April 1, 2012
Even Revolutionary War action figures need spring training to get their spit-and-polish act together. The men of the Fourth Legionary Corps got back into character for the long re-enacting season with a weekend at Fort Frederick just south of Hagerstown. They didn't shave, fended off the evening chill by gathering around the barracks fireplace and practiced the tactics of 18th century warfare. "It's clearing away the cobwebs and seeing that we have everything we need before we go out," said Mike Nigh of Annapolis, who has been a corps member since 2007.
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TRAVEL
By Charles W. Mitchell and Charles W. Mitchell,Special to The Sun | January 31, 1999
Four major wars have been fought on American soil. The first protected early Colonists from the depredations of the French, the second and third freed them forever from the British yoke and the fourth determined whether America would be one nation or two. Fort Frederick, 18 miles west of Hagerstown, in Washington County, served in all but the third (the War of 1812).Built in 1756 by the Colony of Maryland to protect its English settlers from French soldiers and their Native American allies, the fort today sits atop a bluff overlooking the Potomac River, in Fort Frederick State Park.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Ann McArthur | April 21, 2005
Old-time fair Take a trip back in time at Fort Frederick State Park's 18th-Century Market Fair tomorrow when artisans, craftspeople and vendors will display such items as furniture, clothing, guns, powder horns and hunting bags for visitors to view or purchase. Expect to see puppet shows, magicians and music and balancing acts that were all the rage in the 18th century. The 18th-Century Market Fair runs 9 a.m.-5 p.m. tomorrow at Fort Frederick State Park, 11100 Fort Frederick Road in the Cumberland Valley near Big Pool.
NEWS
By Stephanie Desmon and Stephanie Desmon,SUN STAFF | December 16, 2004
BIG POOL -- About 65 years ago, a small group of men borrowed an old flatbed from someone in Hagerstown and a local family lent its tractor. They moved the little wood and tarpaper hut down the road -- with one of them standing atop an old schoolhouse and wielding a broom to keep the electric wires from getting snagged -- to a spot where it would be used for church events. The abandoned building was part of a temporary camp, erected to house the Depression-era Civilian Conservation Corps, whose young members spent much of the mid-1930s rebuilding Fort Frederick State Park, Maryland's first state park.
NEWS
By Greg Tasker and Greg Tasker,Western Maryland Bureau of The Sun | August 28, 1994
BIG POOL -- Frontier wars, Indian uprisings and Civil War skirmishes were not on Francis "Pete" Shoemaker's mind as he and others set about rebuilding Fort Frederick's crumbling stockade.Mr. Shoemaker, then 25 and tired of floating from job to job in Western Maryland during the lean years of the Great Depression, was grateful for the steady work provided by the Civilian Conservation Corps, the federal government's jobs program of the 1930s.But as a stonemason and laborer at the CCC's Fort Frederick camp, Mr. Shoemaker and others like him also became participants in the fort's long, varied and continuing history -- its reconstruction after a century and a half of neglect since the American Revolution.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Ann McArthur | April 21, 2005
Old-time fair Take a trip back in time at Fort Frederick State Park's 18th-Century Market Fair tomorrow when artisans, craftspeople and vendors will display such items as furniture, clothing, guns, powder horns and hunting bags for visitors to view or purchase. Expect to see puppet shows, magicians and music and balancing acts that were all the rage in the 18th century. The 18th-Century Market Fair runs 9 a.m.-5 p.m. tomorrow at Fort Frederick State Park, 11100 Fort Frederick Road in the Cumberland Valley near Big Pool.
NEWS
By Candus Thomson, The Baltimore Sun | April 1, 2012
Even Revolutionary War action figures need spring training to get their spit-and-polish act together. The men of the Fourth Legionary Corps got back into character for the long re-enacting season with a weekend at Fort Frederick just south of Hagerstown. They didn't shave, fended off the evening chill by gathering around the barracks fireplace and practiced the tactics of 18th century warfare. "It's clearing away the cobwebs and seeing that we have everything we need before we go out," said Mike Nigh of Annapolis, who has been a corps member since 2007.
NEWS
October 25, 1997
Senior Olympics was worth Sun's attentionI was surprised and disappointed that The Sun gave zero coverage to the recent 18th Annual Maryland Senior Olympics. I understand that nearly 1,700 competitors from nearly every county in the state participated in a wide variety of sports, from archery to volleyball.I was impressed by how well-organized the event was and by the ferocity of the competitors. In the age 65-to-70 category for basketball foul and floor shooting, I was run off the court in foul shooting, but I managed a fifth-place ribbon for floor shooting.
NEWS
By Timothy B. Wheeler and Timothy B. Wheeler,Staff Writer | December 5, 1992
The latest tests of wells near Fort Detrick in Frederick hav turned up another household whose drinking water contains a toxic chemical suspected of causing cancer, according to the Maryland Department of the Environment.Meanwhile, the U.S. Army Toxic and Hazardous Materials Agency has pledged $500,000 to begin investigating soil and ground water contamination on and around Detrick's Area B, said an Army spokesman. The commitment last month to pay for the investigation resulted from the recent discovery of trichloroethylene (TCE)
NEWS
By Stephanie Desmon and Stephanie Desmon,SUN STAFF | December 16, 2004
BIG POOL -- About 65 years ago, a small group of men borrowed an old flatbed from someone in Hagerstown and a local family lent its tractor. They moved the little wood and tarpaper hut down the road -- with one of them standing atop an old schoolhouse and wielding a broom to keep the electric wires from getting snagged -- to a spot where it would be used for church events. The abandoned building was part of a temporary camp, erected to house the Depression-era Civilian Conservation Corps, whose young members spent much of the mid-1930s rebuilding Fort Frederick State Park, Maryland's first state park.
TRAVEL
By Charles W. Mitchell and Charles W. Mitchell,Special to The Sun | January 31, 1999
Four major wars have been fought on American soil. The first protected early Colonists from the depredations of the French, the second and third freed them forever from the British yoke and the fourth determined whether America would be one nation or two. Fort Frederick, 18 miles west of Hagerstown, in Washington County, served in all but the third (the War of 1812).Built in 1756 by the Colony of Maryland to protect its English settlers from French soldiers and their Native American allies, the fort today sits atop a bluff overlooking the Potomac River, in Fort Frederick State Park.
SPORTS
By Peter Baker and Peter Baker,SUN STAFF | September 27, 1998
Among the special managed hunts on state lands during deer seasons this year are sessions at Fort Frederick State Park in Washington County and Wye Island Natural Resources Management Area near Queenstown on the Eastern Shore.Fort Frederick will be open Dec. 8-10 for shotgun hunters only, and Wye Island will be open for portions of both bow and muzzleloader seasons. The Wye Island bow dates are Oct. 10 through Nov. 25, excluding Sundays, which are closed to hunting in Maryland.At Wye Island, as many as 25 bow hunters per day may sign in at the NRMA during bow hunting dates.
NEWS
October 25, 1997
Senior Olympics was worth Sun's attentionI was surprised and disappointed that The Sun gave zero coverage to the recent 18th Annual Maryland Senior Olympics. I understand that nearly 1,700 competitors from nearly every county in the state participated in a wide variety of sports, from archery to volleyball.I was impressed by how well-organized the event was and by the ferocity of the competitors. In the age 65-to-70 category for basketball foul and floor shooting, I was run off the court in foul shooting, but I managed a fifth-place ribbon for floor shooting.
NEWS
By Greg Tasker and Greg Tasker,Western Maryland Bureau of The Sun | August 28, 1994
BIG POOL -- Frontier wars, Indian uprisings and Civil War skirmishes were not on Francis "Pete" Shoemaker's mind as he and others set about rebuilding Fort Frederick's crumbling stockade.Mr. Shoemaker, then 25 and tired of floating from job to job in Western Maryland during the lean years of the Great Depression, was grateful for the steady work provided by the Civilian Conservation Corps, the federal government's jobs program of the 1930s.But as a stonemason and laborer at the CCC's Fort Frederick camp, Mr. Shoemaker and others like him also became participants in the fort's long, varied and continuing history -- its reconstruction after a century and a half of neglect since the American Revolution.
NEWS
By Timothy B. Wheeler and Timothy B. Wheeler,Staff Writer | December 5, 1992
The latest tests of wells near Fort Detrick in Frederick hav turned up another household whose drinking water contains a toxic chemical suspected of causing cancer, according to the Maryland Department of the Environment.Meanwhile, the U.S. Army Toxic and Hazardous Materials Agency has pledged $500,000 to begin investigating soil and ground water contamination on and around Detrick's Area B, said an Army spokesman. The commitment last month to pay for the investigation resulted from the recent discovery of trichloroethylene (TCE)
SPORTS
October 2, 1998
The cross country runner cited here a week ago, Mike Taye, runs for Frostburg State, not Salisbury State. The Bobcats -- not the Sea Gulls as written here last week -- had won all of their meets going into the Dickinson College Invitational in Carlisle, Pa., where Taye won again. Saturday morning, Taye and the Bobcats are hosts for the Frostburg Invitational at Fort Frederick Park in Big Pool. The women run at 11 a.m. and the men run at 45.Pub Date: 10/02/98
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