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Fort Detrick

NEWS
August 21, 2008
Maryland Attorney General Douglas F. Gansler is pushing the Pentagon to do the right thing - obey the law and comply with an Environmental Protection Agency order that it quickly complete a cleanup of serious pollution at Fort Meade. He's threatening to sue if the Army fails to act. The Pentagon's assurance that public health and safety are not imperiled as it cleans up the Superfund site at its own pace and with its own priorities is not credible. The EPA issued the Fort Meade cleanup order last year because it was worried about drinking water and soil contamination from past dumping at the Anne Arundel County base.
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NEWS
By Stephen Kiehl and Josh Mitchell and Stephen Kiehl and Josh Mitchell,Sun reporters | August 8, 2008
A day after the Justice Department released hundreds of documents purporting to link Bruce E. Ivins to the 2001 anthrax killings, scientists and legal experts criticized the strength of the case and cast doubt on whether it could have succeeded. Federal investigators presented a raft of circumstantial evidence this week intended to prove Ivins' guilt beyond a reasonable doubt. But officials lacked direct evidence, such as hair fibers, DNA samples or handwriting analysis, that the eccentric microbiologist created the deadly powder in his Fort Detrick lab. Questions also remain about Ivins' ability to convert the spores stored in his lab into the powder sent through the mail.
NEWS
By JEAN MARBELLA | August 8, 2008
In case I ever turn up dead while being investigated by the Feds, and they release all the suspicious stuff they've uncovered about me, let me explain right now why I recently Googled "novel kill scientist poisoned strawberry." I was not trying to find a novel way to kill a scientist with a poisoned strawberry, OK? I was trying to remember a book I had read, in which several seemingly unrelated characters mysteriously start dying - including, I thought, a scientist who grew strawberries as a hobby, ate one and died - and it turned out they had all been involved in some secret scheme.
NEWS
By Stephen Kiehl and David Nitkin and Stephen Kiehl and David Nitkin,Sun Reporters | August 7, 2008
Federal authorities released hundreds of pages of documents yesterday in an effort to show that they could prove beyond a reasonable doubt that Bruce Edwards Ivins, the Army scientist who killed himself last week, was the sole person responsible for the deadly 2001 anthrax attacks. The investigators explained how they traced the anthrax used in the attacks back to Ivins' lab at Fort Detrick in Frederick, how Ivins allegedly stymied their investigation, and how what they called a history of mental illness and obsessive behavior helped them build a case that is circumstantial but, they said, irrefutable.
NEWS
By Gabriel Schoenfeld | August 7, 2008
The FBI's investigation of the deadly 2001 anthrax attacks was the most complex and important in the bureau's history. Immense resources were invested in the search for the perpetrator, whose actions killed five people, sickened 17 others, sowed panic in the immediate aftermath of 9/11 and caused taxpayers to spend extraordinary sums on a crash program to protect the nation against the danger of biological terrorism. Yet for all that, the "Amerithrax" investigation, as the FBI dubbed the case, dragged on for seven years and, until quite recently, got nowhere.
NEWS
August 7, 2008
Bruce E. Ivins may not have been the anthrax killer, but scientific, postal and investigative evidence painstakingly compiled by federal agents and released yesterday points strongly to his guilt, as declared by the FBI. The case, detailed by prosecutors and investigators, is circumstantial - there are no witnesses or incriminating statements about the attack that killed five people and terrorized the nation in 2001. But it presents a plausible portrait of Mr. Ivins as the mastermind and sole perpetrator of the first bioterrorist attack in the United States . Mr. Ivins' suicide last week prevents a conclusive resolution of the 7-year-old case.
NEWS
August 5, 2008
The Federal Bureau of Investigation owes it to the victims of the fatal anthrax attacks and to all Americans to make public in detail its case against scientist Bruce Ivins, who committed suicide last week after being told he would be charged with murder in the case. The reason is simple enough: The FBI pursued the wrong suspect for years after the mailing of anthrax-laced letters to members of Congress and the media in 2001, and public confidence in the agency's ability to have identified the right suspect is low. In June, the government agreed to pay Steven J. Hatfill $5.8 million in return for his dropping a harassment lawsuit against the Justice Department.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,Sun reporter | August 5, 2008
A new technology that can quickly distinguish between subtly different strains of anthrax might have been central to the FBI's investigation of the deadly anthrax letters that killed five people and sickened many more in the autumn of 2001. The FBI has not disclosed how it drew a connection between the anthrax attacks and Bruce Ivins, a researcher at the Army's infectious disease lab at Fort Detrick in Frederick. Ivins killed himself last week as prosecutors prepared to indict him in the anthrax killings.
NEWS
By Stephen Kiehl and Stephen Kiehl,Sun Reporter | August 5, 2008
Survivors of the 2001 anthrax attacks and relatives of those killed by the deadly powder said yesterday that they want a full accounting from the FBI of its investigation to date, and they are not yet convinced that Bruce Ivins, the government scientist who killed himself last week, was responsible. Federal authorities are expected to meet this week with the victims' families in Washington to discuss their investigation, after which the FBI could close its nearly seven-year-old anthrax case and publicly release its findings.
NEWS
By David Wood and David Wood,Sun reporter | August 2, 2008
WASHINGTON - Fort Detrick, where scientist Bruce E. Ivins worked for more than three decades, is the largest U.S. government research center focused primarily on biodefense. Set on a former airfield north of Frederick where the Maryland National Guard once based a fleet of biplanes, it houses dozens of labs. Chief among them is the military's main research facility on biological weapons, the U.S. Army Medical Research Institute of Infectious Diseases (USAMRIID), where Ivins and other microbiologists worked on anthrax and other deadly agents.
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