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HEALTH
By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | March 5, 2012
An independent panel of scientists says two government-issued studies can't show if people were harmed by toxic pollution from Fort Detrick contaminating the ground water, but further studies are unlikely to answer lingering questions about the health impacts of the cancer-causing chemicals buried decades ago at the Frederick military base. In a review sponsored by the Army, a committee of environmental and health experts with the National Research Council took issue with a study by the U.S. Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry, which concluded that tainted ground water seeping out from Detrick's Area B was "unlikely to have produced any harmful health effects, including cancer.
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NEWS
Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | August 1, 2014
Public health officials have just one tactic to battle the unrelenting Ebola virus outbreak in West Africa - quarantine - but as the disease continues to spread, scientists in Maryland are among those close to discovering other weapons. Baltimore companies Profectus BioSciences and Paragon Bioservices, as well as researchers at the U.S. Army Medical Research Institute for Infectious Diseases at Fort Detrick in Frederick and the National Institutes of Health in Bethesda, have been part of efforts that have shown a handful of Ebola vaccine candidates are effective in monkeys.
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NEWS
By Kenneth King | February 28, 2011
Frederick residents have had plenty of reminders lately why they should be concerned about the biodefense facilities in their midst: an ongoing cancer cluster investigation related to past groundwater contamination, an Agent Orange protest, and headlines about the 2001 anthrax attacks — which the FBI still insists were perpetrated by a researcher at Fort Detrick's U.S. Army Medical Research Institute for Infectious Diseases (USAMRIID). Little wonder, then, if Frederick residents are troubled about the latest risky biodefense facility at Fort Detrick: a 460,000-square-foot Medical Countermeasures and Test Facility, which, it appears, will aerosolize large numbers of monkeys with bioweapons agents.
NEWS
By Matthew Hay Brown, The Baltimore Sun | May 10, 2014
The would-be developers of a residential neighborhood in Frederick are suing the federal government over alleged groundwater contamination from neighboring Fort Detrick. Waverley View Investors LLC, which owns 92 acres near the long-standing center for biological research, says "the U.S. Army's negligence in its chemical handling and disposal practices" dating back decades has led to levels of trichloroethylene of up to 42 times the federal maximum contaminant level. The corporation, based in McLean, Va., says the contamination has prevented it from realizing plans to develop the land for 732 homes.
NEWS
By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | October 7, 2011
A panel of independent scientists has found flaws in the Army's planning to shield workers and the public from harm from a proposed biodefense laboratory at Fort Detrick in Frederick. The seven-member committee assembled by the National Academy of Sciences concluded that the risk assessment being done by an Army contractor is "not sufficiently robust" to help design a facility that will reduce potential hazards. The $584 million, 492,000-square-foot Medical Countermeasures Test and Evaluation Facility would develop and test vaccines and drugs to prevent or treat infectious diseases.
HEALTH
By Matthew Hay Brown, The Baltimore Sun | October 3, 2011
Neighbors of Fort Detrick were not diagnosed with cancer in greater numbers than the broader population of Frederick County during the period for which data are available, state health officials told the community Monday. But local activists said the state's analysis does not capture the history of cancer around the Army base because it does not take into account cases before 1992, when the state began compiling its cancer registry. Clifford Mitchell of the state Department of Health and Mental Hygiene said cases recorded in the Maryland Cancer Registry from 1992-2008 within two miles of Fort Detrick showed no statistically significant increase in any type of cancer as compared to the rest of the county.
NEWS
By Matthew Hay Brown, The Baltimore Sun | May 10, 2014
The would-be developers of a residential neighborhood in Frederick are suing the federal government over alleged groundwater contamination from neighboring Fort Detrick. Waverley View Investors LLC, which owns 92 acres near the long-standing center for biological research, says "the U.S. Army's negligence in its chemical handling and disposal practices" dating back decades has led to levels of trichloroethylene of up to 42 times the federal maximum contaminant level. The corporation, based in McLean, Va., says the contamination has prevented it from realizing plans to develop the land for 732 homes.
NEWS
By Douglas Birch and Douglas Birch,Sun Staff Writer | June 11, 1995
FREDERICK -- Behind sea-green cinder block walls and stainless steel doors, protected by space suits and sterilizing chemical showers, scientists here are searching for weapons to fight one of Earth's most dangerous predators.This is Fort Detrick's U.S. Army Medical Research Institute of Infectious Diseases, or USAMRIID, one of only five laboratories in the world equipped for the study of such super-lethal, untreatable diseases as Marburg, Lassa and Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever.But recent books, a movie and a deadly epidemic in Africa have focused an international spotlight on USAMRIID's work on one murderous microbe in particular: the Ebola virus.
NEWS
By ANN LoLORDO | April 3, 1994
Today, the Army's infectious disease research institute in Frederick is still using soldiers to test new vaccines for malaria, hepatitis, dengue fever and other exotic diseases.But the human testing program is subject to greater review than its predecessor of 20 years ago.Since 1975, when the U.S. Army Medical Research Institute of Infectious Diseases at Fort Detrick revived its human testing program, there have been about 120 medical research projects with a need for an estimated 2,520 volunteers, according to Carol Linden, director of research plans and programs at the agency, known by its acronym, "USAMRIID."
NEWS
By John Fritze, The Baltimore Sun | June 7, 2013
With its airy lobby and sunlit corridors, the Department of Homeland Security lab at Fort Detrick looks at first more like a modern office building than a place where some of the world's deadliest substances are handled. But the mission becomes clearer as those corridors lead to clusters of rooms, some with submarine-style air locks and foot-thick concrete walls, where air flows are measured and displayed on monitors throughout the building. And instead of art, images of bacteria hang on the wall.
NEWS
By Matthew Hay Brown, The Baltimore Sun | April 28, 2014
The Fort Detrick fire department has been named the best medium-sized department in the Army, base officials said Monday. The installation in Frederick hosts the National Biodefense Analysis and Countermeasures Center, the Army Medical Research Institute of Infectious Diseases, National Institutes of Health research and other sensitive activities. In 2013, Fort Detrick Fire and Emergency Services responded to 1,560 calls on the base and in the Frederick and Silver Spring communities it also serves.
NEWS
December 31, 2013
Sgt. James Albright - Frederick , Md. James Albright received a Purple Heart for wounds he received during the invasion of France in June 1944.  After the war he worked at Fort Detrick in Frederick for more than 30 years.  He died at age 70 in 1986. Born : Apr. 17, 1916 Died : Nov. 12, 1986 Wives : Helen (Roberts) Albright; Virginia (Edwards) Albright   Sgt. James Bartlett - Spencer, West Va.   James Bartlett was a former Towson resident who before the war had worked as a brakeman for the B&O Railroad  on the run from Brunswick to Baltimore.  Bartlett was 66 when he died in 1982.
HEALTH
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | November 27, 2013
State health officials are weighing new safeguards for research laboratories and biotechnology companies that handle potentially deadly infectious pathogens, but whether they will impose any remains uncertain because they don't know how big a threat there is. A state panel's report exploring what are known as biocontainment labs found that there is no single federal or state government body that inspects or tracks the facilities to ensure they...
NEWS
By John Fritze, The Baltimore Sun | June 7, 2013
With its airy lobby and sunlit corridors, the Department of Homeland Security lab at Fort Detrick looks at first more like a modern office building than a place where some of the world's deadliest substances are handled. But the mission becomes clearer as those corridors lead to clusters of rooms, some with submarine-style air locks and foot-thick concrete walls, where air flows are measured and displayed on monitors throughout the building. And instead of art, images of bacteria hang on the wall.
NEWS
By Matthew Hay Brown, The Baltimore Sun | December 8, 2012
First, the Army told Frank Olson's sons that the Fort Detrick scientist's death in a fall from a 13th-floor window of a New York hotel had been an accident. Then a presidential commission revealed that the CIA had given an unwitting Olson LSD as part of a mind-control experiment in remote Western Maryland only nine days before the fall, and concluded that his death had been a drug-related suicide. Now Eric and Nils Olson believe their father - a bioweapons expert who had told colleagues before he died that he wanted to quit the top-secret Special Operations Division - was murdered.
HEALTH
By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | March 5, 2012
An independent panel of scientists says two government-issued studies can't show if people were harmed by toxic pollution from Fort Detrick contaminating the ground water, but further studies are unlikely to answer lingering questions about the health impacts of the cancer-causing chemicals buried decades ago at the Frederick military base. In a review sponsored by the Army, a committee of environmental and health experts with the National Research Council took issue with a study by the U.S. Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry, which concluded that tainted ground water seeping out from Detrick's Area B was "unlikely to have produced any harmful health effects, including cancer.
NEWS
May 28, 1995
Army officials have begun monitoring wells at more than 30 homes near Fort Detrick in Frederick, looking for traces of a dye that will determine the flow of ground water from the post.The study is part of a $3.3 million investigation of chemical contamination at the 1,200-acre facility and elsewhere. Army officials initially believed a trench, where acids, solvents and chemicals were buried decades ago, was the source of pollution. However, various tests have been inconclusive.By injecting dyes in Area B, the site of the trench, the Army hopes to determine ground water flow patterns in limestone bedrock beneath that section of the post in northwest Frederick.
NEWS
By Greg Tasker and Greg Tasker,Western Maryland Bureau of The Sun | August 20, 1994
FREDERICK -- The Army Corps of Engineers has awarded a $3.3 million contract to a Pennsylvania firm to further investigate chemical contamination at Fort Detrick and to find the best way to clean it up.The yearlong project by E.R.M., an Exeter, Pa., environmental consulting firm, will include installation of monitoring wells at varying depths to determine water quality, said Norm Covert, a base spokesman.In addition, the firm will obtain soil samples at varying depths for analysis. Testing will be conducted at sites on the 800-acre Area A, which houses the main post, and Area B, a 400-acre tract off Shookstown Road, and on residential wells outside the facility.
NEWS
By Matthew Hay Brown and Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | October 8, 2011
Randy White had just buried a daughter, dead at 30 with a brain tumor. Now his other daughter had been diagnosed with growths in her abdomen. When doctors told White in 2009 that their conditions were likely caused by something in their environment, the Frederick native thought of Fort Detrick. His children had grown up near the Army base. Detrick was home to the nation's biological weapons program from the 1940s through the 1960s. It remains a key center for medical research. "Anybody that lives in Frederick knows all the rumors," White says.
NEWS
By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | October 7, 2011
A panel of independent scientists has found flaws in the Army's planning to shield workers and the public from harm from a proposed biodefense laboratory at Fort Detrick in Frederick. The seven-member committee assembled by the National Academy of Sciences concluded that the risk assessment being done by an Army contractor is "not sufficiently robust" to help design a facility that will reduce potential hazards. The $584 million, 492,000-square-foot Medical Countermeasures Test and Evaluation Facility would develop and test vaccines and drugs to prevent or treat infectious diseases.
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