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By Arthur Hirsch, The Baltimore Sun | April 13, 2013
When she thinks of Fort Carroll, the abandoned 19th-century military installation in the Patapsco River, Beverly Eisenberg thinks of her grandfather - and of duckpin bowling balls. She visited the six-sided artificial island as a little girl, just a few years after her grandfather bought the place in 1958 hoping to turn it into a destination with a slots casino, hotel and restaurants. He was making cast-iron facsimiles of the cannons that once armed the fort, and the cannons needed cannon balls - duckpin balls that she would paint black and set up at the guns to help Benjamin N. Eisenberg nurture a dream.
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FEATURES
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | June 1, 2013
As gulls and cormorants perched on the walls of Fort Carroll looked on, a crabbing boat stopped long enough to jettison 30 bushel baskets of very special oyster shells into the Patapsco River. On the boat, a handful of Pasadena residents spent their Saturday afternoon planting young oysters in a reef, just as they might have been putting in a crop of tomatoes or zinnias. "We call it Oysters Rock, because we live on Rock Creek," said Chris Wallis, 68, the day's volunteer director.
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NEWS
By Robert A. Erlandson and Robert A. Erlandson,Staff Writer | June 23, 1992
To thousands of motorists who drive across the Key Bridge every day, the curious object 185 feet below resembles a hexagonal vase of bushy green herbs.From sea level, brooding gray, granite walls rear up from the choppy Patapsco River. Empty gun ports stare sightlessly down zTC the Chesapeake Bay they were built to defend -- although they never had to do so.Once inside, after tiptoeing across the rusting steel girders that span from the granite landing stage to the arched entrance, the truth of the vegetation on this artificial island becomes clear.
NEWS
By Arthur Hirsch, The Baltimore Sun | April 13, 2013
When she thinks of Fort Carroll, the abandoned 19th-century military installation in the Patapsco River, Beverly Eisenberg thinks of her grandfather - and of duckpin bowling balls. She visited the six-sided artificial island as a little girl, just a few years after her grandfather bought the place in 1958 hoping to turn it into a destination with a slots casino, hotel and restaurants. He was making cast-iron facsimiles of the cannons that once armed the fort, and the cannons needed cannon balls - duckpin balls that she would paint black and set up at the guns to help Benjamin N. Eisenberg nurture a dream.
NEWS
By Dan Rodricks | October 27, 2000
BILL STRUEVER is Baltimore's big idea man when it comes to reusing old buildings, so I wouldn't presume to tell him what to do with Fort Carroll, now that he's taken a lease on the place and has ideas about buying it. But such dream-hatching is irresistible. Fort Carroll has been sitting out there, a long-abandoned, rat-infested, manmade island in the Patapsco River just south of the Francis Scott Key Bridge, waiting for a new life. Someone wanted to put a casino there once upon a time.
FEATURES
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | June 28, 2003
Just east of the Key Bridge lies Fort Carroll, the rather forbidding-looking six-sided outer harbor fortress that has been off-limits for decades to visitors, warned off no doubt by a sign that advises the potentially curious: PRIVATE. KEEP OFF. GUARD DOG. The abandoned fort is, however, home to squadrons of seagulls who perch on its bulwarks and swallows who dip and reel in their frenzied flight. It is said that rats also lead a rather comfortable existence there. The windswept fort has been a sentinel to mariners steaming to Baltimore since it first began building on the Sollers Point Flats in 1848.
NEWS
By Howard Libit and Howard Libit,SUN STAFF | March 25, 2004
The wait for a House committee vote on Gov. Robert L. Ehrlich Jr.'s slots proposal hasn't dampened interest among casino companies in getting involved in Maryland. One major company -- which employs Maryland's former tourism director as its government relations director -- is eyeing at least two sites, one in Cecil County and another at the Fort Carroll island on the southern edge of Baltimore, as potential locations for slots dens. Ehrlich has been presented with at least one very preliminary proposal for a casino developer to purchase the state-owned Rocky Gap Lodge and Golf Resort in Cumberland and some nearby state-owned land in Allegany County, permitting the construction of a slots facility adjacent to the resort.
NEWS
By Antero Pietila and Antero Pietila,SUN STAFF | August 2, 2004
In 1958, a speculator thought long-abandoned Fort Carroll, seven miles south of Baltimore's Inner Harbor, would make an impressive gambling den. How many casinos, after all, have 10-foot-thick granite walls and gunports? But 46 years after Benjamin N. Eisenberg, a local lawyer, bought the bastion, hoping to turn it into a slots venue, it remains a ghost fort that's being overrun by trees, vines and weeds. Hundreds of sea gulls, egrets and herons have taken possession of the pre-Civil War fortress.
NEWS
March 25, 2005
On Air TV and Radio The Environmental Report Tuesday, 9:55 a.m. WEAA (88.9 public radio). Host Morning Sunday provides reports on air quality and tips to help regreen cities. Outdoors Maryland Tuesday, 7:30 p.m. (Repeats Thursday, 5:30 a.m., and April 2, 5:30 p.m.) MPT "Colonel Lee's Birdhouse." Driving across the Key Bridge, looking south, it's the hexagonal chunk of brown granite poking its head above the dancing chop of the Patapsco River. It's Fort Carroll, the built-like-a-tank outpost begun in 1847 to stop any attempt to invade the thriving port of Baltimore.
NEWS
By Antero Pietila | May 30, 2000
FORT CARROLL, four miles downstream from Fort McHenry, is one of Baltimore's best-kept secrets. The 150-year-old privately owned hexagonal stronghold is still in relatively good shape -- even though it has been abandoned for decades. Most Baltimoreans have never seen the 3.45-acre artificial island, which lies underneath the Francis Scott Key Memorial Bridge. Nor is any interest encouraged. "We would prefer no publicity," says Alan Eisenberg, one of the Patapsco River fort's owners. His father, the late Benjamin N. Eisenberg, bought the fort for $10,000 in 1958.
NEWS
November 1, 2007
INSIDE TODAY WHAT THEY ARE SAYING The wisdom of keeping Trembley The Orioles look smart -- and have clean hands -- for deciding to name Dave Trembley as manager for next year and avoiding this off-season's unsavory manager market. Sports baltimoresun.com/steele Fort Carroll as slots palace Fort Carroll is a perfect place for a slots, but the idea is likely to draw fire from critics who'd prefer to see it continue as a bird sanctuary. Maryland baltimoresun.com/rodricks other voices Mike Himowitz on jott.
NEWS
September 2, 2005
Outdoors Maryland Tomorrow, 5:30 a.m. and 5:30 p.m. MPT "Colonel Lee's Birdhouse." Fort Carroll, south of the Key Bridge, was begun in 1847 to stop any attempt to invade Baltimore. U.S. Army Brevet Col. Robert E. Lee had high hopes for the fort when he oversaw its construction, but it never saw action and was never completed. Now it has become home to a world-class nesting-bird rookery. There is a problem, though: The trees that provide nesting cradles may be threatening Fort Carroll's structural integrity.
NEWS
By Antero Pietila and Antero Pietila,SUN STAFF | August 2, 2004
In 1958, a speculator thought long-abandoned Fort Carroll, seven miles south of Baltimore's Inner Harbor, would make an impressive gambling den. How many casinos, after all, have 10-foot-thick granite walls and gunports? But 46 years after Benjamin N. Eisenberg, a local lawyer, bought the bastion, hoping to turn it into a slots venue, it remains a ghost fort that's being overrun by trees, vines and weeds. Hundreds of sea gulls, egrets and herons have taken possession of the pre-Civil War fortress.
NEWS
By Howard Libit and Howard Libit,SUN STAFF | March 25, 2004
The wait for a House committee vote on Gov. Robert L. Ehrlich Jr.'s slots proposal hasn't dampened interest among casino companies in getting involved in Maryland. One major company -- which employs Maryland's former tourism director as its government relations director -- is eyeing at least two sites, one in Cecil County and another at the Fort Carroll island on the southern edge of Baltimore, as potential locations for slots dens. Ehrlich has been presented with at least one very preliminary proposal for a casino developer to purchase the state-owned Rocky Gap Lodge and Golf Resort in Cumberland and some nearby state-owned land in Allegany County, permitting the construction of a slots facility adjacent to the resort.
NEWS
May 23, 1994
Everyone knows about Fort McHenry -- and how Francis Scott Key was so moved after seeing the Old Glory still flying over it after a night of bombardment by the British in 1814 that he wrote "The Star-Spangled Banner."But Fort McHenry, built between 1775 and 1794, was just one of a network of forts built over the years to defend Baltimore.In addition to that restored fort, remnants of four others still remain: Fort Howard at North Point in Baltimore County; Fort Armistead at Hawkins Point in the city; Fort Smallwood in Anne Arundel County and Fort Carroll, a small artificial island in the Patapsco River next to the Francis Scott Key Memorial Bridge.
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