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By Tom Bowman and Tom Bowman,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | January 11, 2000
WASHINGTON -- The Army's inspector general will review the military's "don't ask, don't tell" policy at Army installations around the country, officials said yesterday, after the beating death of a gay soldier and complaints that anti-gay harassment is continuing. Army Secretary Louis Caldera said he is directing Lt. Gen. Michael W. Ackerman, the inspector general, to assess how the Army is implementing the military's policy on homosexual conduct. Caldera said Ackerman will focus on the leadership at Fort Campbell, Ky., where Pfc. Barry L. Winchell, 21, was taunted by fellow soldiers and beaten to death in July.
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NEWS
April 14, 2007
As of yesterday, at least 3,297 members of the U.S. military have died since the beginning of the Iraq war in March 2003. Identifications Staff Sgt. Marcus A. Golczynski, 30, Lewisburg, Tenn.; killed March 27 in combat in Anbar province; assigned to the Marine Reserve's 3rd Battalion, 24th Marine Regiment, 4th Marine Division; Nashville, Tenn. Master Sgt. Sean M. Thomas, 33, Harrisburg, Pa.; killed March 27 by small-arms fire in Baghdad; assigned to the 28th Division Support Command.
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NEWS
By ASSOCAITED PRESS | January 2, 2005
FORT CAMPBELL, Ky. - Fake blood spewed, smoke billowed, strobe lights flashed and two high-tech dummies with limbs blown off lay on the ground. "Medic! Somebody call a medic!" a woman shrieked as the sound of gunfire erupted from the shadows. In rushed Pfc. Merinda Karn, 20, with aid bag in hand for a test of her medic skills. As the insurgents in Iraq step up their attacks, the Army has increased the intensity of its training of battlefield medics. That has meant moving the training from classrooms to more realistic settings and teaching medics to keep fighting the enemy - even if it means sometimes delaying treatment of the wounded.
NEWS
By ASSOCAITED PRESS | January 2, 2005
FORT CAMPBELL, Ky. - Fake blood spewed, smoke billowed, strobe lights flashed and two high-tech dummies with limbs blown off lay on the ground. "Medic! Somebody call a medic!" a woman shrieked as the sound of gunfire erupted from the shadows. In rushed Pfc. Merinda Karn, 20, with aid bag in hand for a test of her medic skills. As the insurgents in Iraq step up their attacks, the Army has increased the intensity of its training of battlefield medics. That has meant moving the training from classrooms to more realistic settings and teaching medics to keep fighting the enemy - even if it means sometimes delaying treatment of the wounded.
NEWS
By Scott Calvert and Scott Calvert,SUN STAFF | March 2, 2003
FORT CAMPBELL, Ky. - A quiet settled over the low-slung brick headquarters of the 3rd Battalion, 327th Infantry Regiment last week. Many of its 700 soldiers were going home to say goodbye to their families for half a year or longer. The battalion belongs to the Army's 101st Airborne Division, which is deploying to Kuwait for a possible war with Iraq. Its deployment is a vast undertaking that includes the airlift of 19,000 soldiers from here to the Persian Gulf, one of the final stages of a U.S. troop buildup expected to approach 250,000.
NEWS
April 14, 2007
As of yesterday, at least 3,297 members of the U.S. military have died since the beginning of the Iraq war in March 2003. Identifications Staff Sgt. Marcus A. Golczynski, 30, Lewisburg, Tenn.; killed March 27 in combat in Anbar province; assigned to the Marine Reserve's 3rd Battalion, 24th Marine Regiment, 4th Marine Division; Nashville, Tenn. Master Sgt. Sean M. Thomas, 33, Harrisburg, Pa.; killed March 27 by small-arms fire in Baghdad; assigned to the 28th Division Support Command.
NEWS
By Richard A. Serrano and Richard A. Serrano,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | June 17, 2003
FORT KNOX, Ky. - Two military officers testified yesterday that a man resembling Army Sgt. Asan Akbar warned that their unit was under attack moments before allegedly rolling grenades into headquarters tents in Kuwait in the early days of the war against Iraq in March. The testimony came during the first day of a weeklong preliminary hearing that will determine whether Akbar, 32, a native of Los Angeles, will be tried before a general court-martial. Army prosecutors contend that Akbar struck out against the military by also hurling grenades and shooting at soldiers as they fled from the burning tents.
NEWS
By Ken Fireman and Ken Fireman,NEWSDAY | March 19, 2004
FORT CAMPBELL, Ky. - Surrounded by thousands of flag-waving soldiers yesterday, President Bush offered a full-throated rebuttal to Democratic charges that he has mishandled the war on terror and failed to support U.S. military personnel. In a speech at the home of the legendary 101st Airborne Division, which recently returned from Iraq after suffering more casualties than any other Army division, Bush also urged nervous European leaders to stand firm in the face of terrorist attacks such as last week's train bombings in Madrid.
NEWS
By Scott Calvert and Scott Calvert,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | April 18, 2004
FORT CAMPBELL, Ky. - A year ago in Baghdad, Sgt. Anthony Wright of Essex swore one taste of war was enough. But now, fresh off an 11-month tour in Iraq, he's not sure anymore. Rumors are ricocheting around this city-size base that the Army's 101st Airborne Division might go to Afghanistan or back to Iraq within a year, and Wright is thinking about re-enlisting before his hitch ends this summer. If his buddies go back to combat, he might go along. "I went through all of that with them," the soft-spoken 21-year-old says in the spare, dimly lighted Charlie Company headquarters here.
NEWS
May 26, 2002
Army Sgt. Philip J. Svitak was 31 years old when he died March 4, killed in action in Afghanistan. He was one of seven Americans killed that day in the mountains of eastern Afghanistan when two U.S. helicopters carrying troops came under enemy fire. "Phil gave his life for his country," his brother-in-law, Sean Starmer, said at the funeral, according to an account in the Kansas City Star. "When one gives his life for his country, he should never be forgotten." Tomorrow, America observes Memorial Day, dedicated to remembering Svitak and all the others who have given their lives while serving their country.
NEWS
By Scott Calvert and Scott Calvert,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | April 18, 2004
FORT CAMPBELL, Ky. - A year ago in Baghdad, Sgt. Anthony Wright of Essex swore one taste of war was enough. But now, fresh off an 11-month tour in Iraq, he's not sure anymore. Rumors are ricocheting around this city-size base that the Army's 101st Airborne Division might go to Afghanistan or back to Iraq within a year, and Wright is thinking about re-enlisting before his hitch ends this summer. If his buddies go back to combat, he might go along. "I went through all of that with them," the soft-spoken 21-year-old says in the spare, dimly lighted Charlie Company headquarters here.
NEWS
By Ken Fireman and Ken Fireman,NEWSDAY | March 19, 2004
FORT CAMPBELL, Ky. - Surrounded by thousands of flag-waving soldiers yesterday, President Bush offered a full-throated rebuttal to Democratic charges that he has mishandled the war on terror and failed to support U.S. military personnel. In a speech at the home of the legendary 101st Airborne Division, which recently returned from Iraq after suffering more casualties than any other Army division, Bush also urged nervous European leaders to stand firm in the face of terrorist attacks such as last week's train bombings in Madrid.
NEWS
By Richard A. Serrano and Richard A. Serrano,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | June 17, 2003
FORT KNOX, Ky. - Two military officers testified yesterday that a man resembling Army Sgt. Asan Akbar warned that their unit was under attack moments before allegedly rolling grenades into headquarters tents in Kuwait in the early days of the war against Iraq in March. The testimony came during the first day of a weeklong preliminary hearing that will determine whether Akbar, 32, a native of Los Angeles, will be tried before a general court-martial. Army prosecutors contend that Akbar struck out against the military by also hurling grenades and shooting at soldiers as they fled from the burning tents.
NEWS
By Scott Calvert and Scott Calvert,SUN STAFF | March 2, 2003
FORT CAMPBELL, Ky. - A quiet settled over the low-slung brick headquarters of the 3rd Battalion, 327th Infantry Regiment last week. Many of its 700 soldiers were going home to say goodbye to their families for half a year or longer. The battalion belongs to the Army's 101st Airborne Division, which is deploying to Kuwait for a possible war with Iraq. Its deployment is a vast undertaking that includes the airlift of 19,000 soldiers from here to the Persian Gulf, one of the final stages of a U.S. troop buildup expected to approach 250,000.
NEWS
By Tom Bowman and Tom Bowman,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | January 11, 2000
WASHINGTON -- The Army's inspector general will review the military's "don't ask, don't tell" policy at Army installations around the country, officials said yesterday, after the beating death of a gay soldier and complaints that anti-gay harassment is continuing. Army Secretary Louis Caldera said he is directing Lt. Gen. Michael W. Ackerman, the inspector general, to assess how the Army is implementing the military's policy on homosexual conduct. Caldera said Ackerman will focus on the leadership at Fort Campbell, Ky., where Pfc. Barry L. Winchell, 21, was taunted by fellow soldiers and beaten to death in July.
NEWS
December 20, 2010
Almost 20 years ago, my daughter would push her baby carriage up and down our street in Fort Campbell, Ky., and stop now and then to check on her baby — "Are you okay, Hon?" Or "What's the matter, Hon?" Many of our neighbors thought this was the cutest thing — her endearing term for her baby doll. Being as we were living on a military base, no one was familiar with the term "hon. " However, my daughter had already picked it up from me, as she was learning to talk. Denise Whiting, you cannot copyright a word/meaning that is indigenous to an area ( "Whiting: Hon trademark taken out of context," Dec. 19)
NEWS
By Nicole Fuller and Rona Kobell and Nicole Fuller and Rona Kobell,Sun reporters | February 23, 2008
A Glen Burnie soldier was one of three men killed in Iraq this week after their vehicle hit a roadside bomb, the Pentagon said yesterday. Spc. Micheal B. Matlock Jr., 21, an infantryman with the 101st Airborne Division, died Wednesday from wounds suffered when his vehicle hit an improvised explosive device in Baghdad, where the soldiers were responsible for security. Also fatally injured in the Tuesday explosion were Sgt. Conrad Alvarez, 22, of Big Spring, Texas, and Cpl. Albert Bitton, 20, of Chicago.
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