Advertisement
HomeCollectionsFort Belvoir
IN THE NEWS

Fort Belvoir

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
By David Michael Ettlin and David Michael Ettlin,Staff Writer | June 23, 1992
The Army has announced plans to consolidate its ordnance training facility at Fort Belvoir, Va., with the larger ordnance center and school at Aberdeen Proving Ground -- moving more than 200 jobs to the Harford County post.The move, announced yesterday, comes as the Army also is considering a larger merger of the ordnance schools at Aberdeen and the Redstone Arsenal in Huntsville, Ala., with 1,000 or more jobs and local economic impact at stake. Whether such a consolidation would be at Aberdeen or Huntsville has not been announced.
ARTICLES BY DATE
SPORTS
By Jeff Zrebiec and The Baltimore Sun | April 4, 2014
FORT BELVOIR, Va. - He threw passes, ran routes and even bent over and got into a goal-line stance, allowing himself to be driven back several yards by kids half his size. And when he was done with all that, new Ravens wide receiver Steve Smith sprinted from station to station, autographing the backs of shirts of unsuspecting kids and stopping only to shake hands and say thanks to members of the U.S. military. "So often nowadays, there's so many issues, there's so many things going on. Sometimes, the very thing that you miss is a thank-you,” Smith said Thursday, during a break from his football camp for 100 children of active-duty military members at Fort Belvoir.
Advertisement
SPORTS
By Jeff Zrebiec and The Baltimore Sun | April 4, 2014
FORT BELVOIR, Va. - He threw passes, ran routes and even bent over and got into a goal-line stance, allowing himself to be driven back several yards by kids half his size. And when he was done with all that, new Ravens wide receiver Steve Smith sprinted from station to station, autographing the backs of shirts of unsuspecting kids and stopping only to shake hands and say thanks to members of the U.S. military. "So often nowadays, there's so many issues, there's so many things going on. Sometimes, the very thing that you miss is a thank-you,” Smith said Thursday, during a break from his football camp for 100 children of active-duty military members at Fort Belvoir.
NEWS
By Matthew Hay Brown, The Baltimore Sun | March 11, 2014
Fort Meade officials evacuated a residential section of the base Tuesday afternoon after utility workers discovered unexploded ordnance. The device was found to be an inert mortar training round from World War II, a base spokeswoman said, and residents were allowed to return to their homes. The utility workers discovered the round in the Potomac Place neighborhood while performing scheduled maintenance, spokeswoman Mary Doyle said. Emergency workers cordoned off a 300-meter area and rerouted traffic around Reece Road.
NEWS
By Rona Kobell and Rona Kobell,SUN STAFF | September 16, 2003
In a last-ditch effort to save their government jobs, workers at Fort Meade are appealing the Army's decision to contract out two departments - more than 220 jobs - on the Odenton base. Last month, the Army announced that Milwaukee-based Johnson Controls Inc. had won the five-year contract to manage the Army's public works and logistics departments with its $33 million bid. The government workers can reapply for their positions with Johnson Controls, which is expected to take over the work next year.
BUSINESS
May 4, 1992
DEFENSE CONTRACTSOmni Construction Inc. in Bethesda won a $4,587,000 contract from the Navy to provide an aircraft alert facility at the Naval Air Station at Patuxent River.NON-DEFENSE CONTRACTSITT/JTS Inc. in Annapolis won a $19,506,836 contract from the U.S. Department of Labor to provide Westover Job Corps Center Awards.SBA/ROW Sciences Inc. in Rockville won a $2,097,268 contract from the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency to provide support services in health, environmental and chemical research, and environmental data development services.
NEWS
By Matthew Hay Brown, The Baltimore Sun | March 11, 2014
Fort Meade officials evacuated a residential section of the base Tuesday afternoon after utility workers discovered unexploded ordnance. The device was found to be an inert mortar training round from World War II, a base spokeswoman said, and residents were allowed to return to their homes. The utility workers discovered the round in the Potomac Place neighborhood while performing scheduled maintenance, spokeswoman Mary Doyle said. Emergency workers cordoned off a 300-meter area and rerouted traffic around Reece Road.
NEWS
By Melissa Harris and Melissa Harris,SUN STAFF | May 22, 2005
Like many federal workers driving from the Baltimore suburbs into Washington every day, Marshall Hudson picks his poison - the Beltway, New York Avenue or Massachusetts Avenue - based on the 7:15 a.m. radio traffic report. On a good day, he gets to the National Geospatial-Intelligence Agency in an hour - a dream commute compared with the one he would have if the Pentagon closes his office in Bethesda and moves it to Fort Belvoir, Va., as part of a nationwide shuffling and consolidating of military resources.
NEWS
November 14, 1990
A Mass of the Resurrection for J. Allen Lawrence, a retired head chef at the Limestone Valley Dinner Theater who had specialized in seafood in a number of Baltimore restaurant kitchens, will be offered at 9 a.m. today at the Roman Catholic Church of the Crucifixion, 100 Scott Ave., Glen Burnie.Mr. Lawrence, who was 71 and lived on Gordon Court in Glen Burnie, died Saturday at Johns Hopkins Hospital of liver disease.A heavyset man who was known as Big Al, he retired seven years ago after working at the dinner theater for almost 10 years.
NEWS
By Melissa Harris and Melissa Harris,SUN STAFF | July 8, 2005
WASHINGTON - Appearing before stern-faced members of the panel that will decide the fate of thousands of American jobs this year, Washington leaders asked them yesterday to reject plans to close military installations in the nation's capital - most notably the flagship Walter Reed Army Medical Center - and transfer some of those jobs to facilities in Maryland suburbs. The hearing on Capitol Hill opened two days of lobbying from officials hoping to stave off the possibility of everything from millions of square feet of vacant office space in Northern Virginia to the loss of a New Jersey county's largest employer and high-tech hub. The stakes are high for the nation's capital.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | September 5, 2013
Salvatore J. Russo, a retired Bethlehem Steel timekeeper and World War II veteran, died of diabetic complications Sunday at Emeritus Senior Living in Towson. The Cockeysville resident was 94. Born in Baltimore, he was the son of Florence and Antonio Russo, Italian immigrants who lived on Berger Avenue. After attending the Polytechnic Institute, he worked at the family's Belair Market fruit and produce business in Oldtown. Family members said he was inducted into the Army in early 1941.
NEWS
By Kenneth Lavon Johnson | August 27, 2013
In the spring of 1963, when I was a student at the U.S. Army's Judge Advocate General Corps School in Charlottesville, Va., the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr. came to town to speak to the student body of the University of Virginia. At the time, my brother, Henry Floyd Johnson, was studying at UVA while also serving as the pastor of a church in Charlottesville. He had known King for some time, and took me to meet him on the evening that he was scheduled to speak. King greeted me warmly, and we chatted for about 15 minutes.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | December 12, 2011
Fredric Julian Ptaschek Jr., a former Army musician who had worked in University of Maryland medical collections, died of a heart attack Dec. 9 at Christiana Medical Center in Newark, Del. The Parkville resident was 63. The former pipe major of the John F. Nicoll Pipe Band, he became ill after participating in a parade in Aberdeen on Dec. 3. Born in Fort Benning, Ga., he studied music as a child and was a 1966 graduate of Pikesville Senior High...
NEWS
April 25, 2009
Families sue over fatal Bay Bridge crash 2 The families of three men killed in a 2007 crash on the Bay Bridge are suing a Maryland agency and several drivers over the accident. James Hewitt Ingle and Randall and Jonathan Orff died and five people were injured in May 2007 when a trailer being hauled behind a sport utility vehicle came loose and caused a multiple-vehicle crash. The Ingle and Orff families are suing the Maryland Transportation Authority, the driver of the SUV, the owner of the trailer and two truck drivers and their employers for $19 million.
NEWS
By Melissa Harris and Melissa Harris,SUN STAFF | July 8, 2005
WASHINGTON - Appearing before stern-faced members of the panel that will decide the fate of thousands of American jobs this year, Washington leaders asked them yesterday to reject plans to close military installations in the nation's capital - most notably the flagship Walter Reed Army Medical Center - and transfer some of those jobs to facilities in Maryland suburbs. The hearing on Capitol Hill opened two days of lobbying from officials hoping to stave off the possibility of everything from millions of square feet of vacant office space in Northern Virginia to the loss of a New Jersey county's largest employer and high-tech hub. The stakes are high for the nation's capital.
NEWS
By Larry Carson and Laura Cadiz and Larry Carson and Laura Cadiz,SUN STAFF | June 4, 2005
State leaders are working behind the scenes to halt the proposed shift of the secretive National Geospatial-Intelligence Agency from Bethesda to Virginia, arguing that if it must move, the operation should go to Fort Meade, which is set to undergo a major expansion over the next seven years. The 3,000-worker agency, which does mapping and analysis of satellite photographs and images for the military, is the only major military facility slated to leave Maryland under the Pentagon's proposed shakeup of military bases.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | December 12, 2011
Fredric Julian Ptaschek Jr., a former Army musician who had worked in University of Maryland medical collections, died of a heart attack Dec. 9 at Christiana Medical Center in Newark, Del. The Parkville resident was 63. The former pipe major of the John F. Nicoll Pipe Band, he became ill after participating in a parade in Aberdeen on Dec. 3. Born in Fort Benning, Ga., he studied music as a child and was a 1966 graduate of Pikesville Senior High...
NEWS
By Melissa Harris and Melissa Harris,SUN STAFF | May 22, 2005
Like many federal workers driving from the Baltimore suburbs into Washington every day, Marshall Hudson picks his poison - the Beltway, New York Avenue or Massachusetts Avenue - based on the 7:15 a.m. radio traffic report. On a good day, he gets to the National Geospatial-Intelligence Agency in an hour - a dream commute compared with the one he would have if the Pentagon closes his office in Bethesda and moves it to Fort Belvoir, Va., as part of a nationwide shuffling and consolidating of military resources.
NEWS
By Rona Kobell and Rona Kobell,SUN STAFF | September 16, 2003
In a last-ditch effort to save their government jobs, workers at Fort Meade are appealing the Army's decision to contract out two departments - more than 220 jobs - on the Odenton base. Last month, the Army announced that Milwaukee-based Johnson Controls Inc. had won the five-year contract to manage the Army's public works and logistics departments with its $33 million bid. The government workers can reapply for their positions with Johnson Controls, which is expected to take over the work next year.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.