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By Rob Hiaasen and Rob Hiaasen,Sun Staff Writer | March 27, 1995
He curses. He smokes pot. He dreads calling his weepy mom. He ends up in jail, outer space, a mental hospital, and in the French Quarter with a stripper named Wanda and an ape named Sue.Meet the real Forrest Gump. Not the "Forrest Gump" that has made more than $300 million at the box office and is expected to dominate tonight's Academy Awards ceremony.The movie, which is up for Best Picture and 12 other Oscars, took the main character from an obscure book, sanitized him and transformed him in to a cultural phenomenon.
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By Chris Kaltenbach and The Baltimore Sun | October 25, 2013
Chances are, the greeting, "It's Lt. Dan!" was heard more than a few times on the Naval Academy grounds this week. Actor Gary Sinise, Oscar-nominated for playing the irascible Lt. Dan in "Forrest Gump" and -- more pertintently here -- a steadfast supporter of the U.S. armed forces, paid a visit to the U.S. Naval Academy Thursday. While in Annapolis, Sinise toured the academy grounds and met with academy leadership, including the superintendent, Vice Admiral Michael H. Miller, and Commandant of Midshipmen Captain William Byrne, said USNA spokeswoman Judy Campbell.
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By Ed Siegel and Ed Siegel,Boston Globe | August 14, 1994
It seems that everywhere you look these days, artistic bloat is spreading like Pavarotti's waistline. Luciano, Placido, Jose and Zubin are together again, with the Chairman in attendance. A simpleton named Forrest Gump tells us everything we need to know about racial intolerance, Vietnam and love in a time of AIDS. Woodstock II is in session. Bigger is better, but merchandising is best.What passes for art these days is a depressing assortment of pop grandiosity disguised as artistic gravitas, commerce disguised as coolness.
SPORTS
By Don Markus, The Baltimore Sun | December 29, 2012
Long before Doug Masiuk became a serious runner, he had to learn how take his lifelong battle with Type 1 diabetes one step at a time. Diagnosed when he was a toddler, Masiuk, now 38, played soccer through high school at Severna Park. Once his soccer career ended, Masiuk had to find another physical activity to help him combat a life-threatening auto-immune disease that prevents the pancreas from producing insulin and can cause dangerously high blood-sugar levels. Several years ago, Masiuk turned to long-distance running.
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By Sandy Grady | March 29, 1995
WASHINGTON -- LET'S SEE if you have it: Dumb is good, smart is bad. Simple is good, complex is bad. Stupid is great, brilliant is terrible.Hey, you're ready to run for president in 1996 on the Gump ticket.When asked a tricky question on "Meet the Press," look glassy-eyed and drone, "Mama told me life is like a box of chocolates."Or when debating your opponent, constantly snap, "Stupid is as stupid does."In the swirl of trophies, blather and applause for "Forrest Gump" at Monday night's Oscar awards, we saw Hollywood's glitziest celebration of the "Dumbing Down of America."
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By Kevin Cowherd and Kevin Cowherd,Sun Staff Writer | January 12, 1995
Of all the disturbing developments in our lives, surely the most disturbing is this: Suddenly it's cool to be dumb.All around us, the Culture of Dumb is in ascendancy. In fact, the dumber you are, the better. Dumb as a rock. Dumb as a fence post. Sitting slack-jawed, vacant-eyed and slobbering in front of MTV -- these are all good things now.Remember that old put-down: "Well, he's no rocket scientist"? Today that's considered the ultimate compliment to some. These people will actually come up and kiss you for saying that.
BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella and Lorraine Mirabella,SUN STAFF | July 10, 1998
Bubba Gump Shrimp Co., a fast-growing, 2-year-old theme restaurant chain inspired by a hit movie, will open its first East Coast location this year in Baltimore's Inner Harbor.The joint venture between Paramount Pictures and California-based Rusty Pelican Restaurants Inc., based on Paramount's Oscar-winning 1994 "Forrest Gump," will join the Hard Rock Cafe, ESPN Zone and the Barnes & Noble book and music emporium at the newly converted former Power Plant entertainment complex.The chain, licensed by Paramount, opened its first location two years ago on historic Cannery Row in Monterey, Calif.
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By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,Sun Film Critic | March 26, 1995
Can nice guys finish first? Or will nastiness, hostility, cynicism, blasphemous language and illogical plot progressions rule the day?Yes, it's "Forrest Gump" vs. O. J.'s defense team.No, no, we're talking Oscars here: It's really "Forrest Gump" vs. the much-loved and much-reviled "Pulp Fiction" for Best Picture and a slew of other awards.Many critics have insisted on over-symbolizing the race, but then that's what critics are paid to do, isn't it? Still, to represent it as powers of light vs. powers of darkness -- or the old, square, decent, honest, wunnerful Ammurica of "Forrest Gump" vs. the new, snide, hip, self-adoring America of Quentin Tarantino -- goes a bit far.Leave us take a reality check, thank you, and remember that purely in terms of film craft, "Forrest Gump" was by far the most sophisticated film, replete with more special effects than any of the "Star Wars" films.
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By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,Sun Film Critic | March 28, 1995
"Forrest Gump" proved that nice guys finish first, and that $315 million at the box office carries a lot of clout, as the story of the lovably lucky, but intelligence-impaired Alabaman on a cavalcade through modern American history won six Academy Awards last night.Besides the coveted and climactic Best Picture award, the movie also won for Best Actor (Tom Hanks), Best Director (Robert Zemeckis) Best Adapted Screenplay (Eric Roth), Best Visual Effects and Best Film Editing.Hanks became the first actor to win back-to-back Best Actor Oscars since Spencer Tracy in 1937-1938.
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By Lisa Gutierrez and Lisa Gutierrez,KNIGHT RIDDER / TRIBUNE | December 3, 2004
It's like in the movie, when Forrest Gump just takes off running, all across America. He runs and runs along highways and byways. Then, one day, he stops. Just stops. Yeah, it's kind of like that. Four years ago, a Swiss long-distance runner named Serge Roetheli sold his home in the shadow of the Alps, laced up his Nikes and took off running. All across the world. He's going to run until early May, right before his 50th birthday, when he and his wife, Nicole, who rides beside him on a motorcycle hauling their belongings in a trailer, return to their hometown near the Matterhorn.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Richard Gorelick, The Baltimore Sun | May 15, 2012
The Brass Elephant could soon be reopening. Well, not the Brass Elephant exactly. A restaurant named The Museum is set to open within weeks at 924 N. Charles St., the elegant Mount Vernon townhouse that the Brass Elephant called home for almost 30 years before closing in August 2009. The multistory restaurant property remains in the hands of Charles Street Restaurant Inc., which has entered into an operating agreement with Walter Webb, according to longtime owner Stuart Teper. Webb could not be reached for comment.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Richard Gorelick and The Baltimore Sun | June 15, 2011
I've never been to a Bubba Gump Co. I've been reading some online reviews, and it sounds in general like Bubba Gump is better than people thought it was going to be. They have fun there. Not everyone agrees; people seldom do.    Forrest Gump Visits Bubba Gump Shrimp Co in Daytona Beach from SEE Coastal Media on Vimeo .   We can only realy agree that Bubba's "shrimp" speech in Forrest Gump is one of the most excruciating sequences in the history of cinema.
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By Gina Davis and Gina Davis,Sun reporter | June 21, 2007
After wringing his hands over final exams last week, rising ninth-grader Miles Kraemer welcomed the down time that came this week with the last two days of school. Instead of having to fret over math, he was able to watch three movies, including Forrest Gump for the first time, play a few hands of cards with friends and sign yearbooks while his teachers packed up classrooms, accounted for missing textbooks, and otherwise prepared to turn in their keys for the summer. "Forrest Gump was kind of educational," Miles, 14, offered in a futile attempt to justify how he and his classmates had wiled away the time at Franklin Middle School in Reisterstown.
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By MICHAEL SRAGOW and MICHAEL SRAGOW,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | June 2, 2006
Tom Hanks' latest movie, The Da Vinci Code, opened May 19, a day before Jimmy Stewart's birthday. (Stewart was born in Indiana, Pa., on May 20, 1908.) Entertainment writers have often called Hanks today's Jimmy Stewart. That comparison has never looked shakier than it does right now. Stewart's most famous suspense films were obsessive and erotic fables for Alfred Hitchcock, leagues away from Ron Howard's stodgy, cautious The Da Vinci Code. Indeed, throughout his career, Stewart drew inspiration from a score of strong, diverse directors, from Ernst Lubitsch to Otto Preminger.
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By Lisa Gutierrez and Lisa Gutierrez,KNIGHT RIDDER / TRIBUNE | December 3, 2004
It's like in the movie, when Forrest Gump just takes off running, all across America. He runs and runs along highways and byways. Then, one day, he stops. Just stops. Yeah, it's kind of like that. Four years ago, a Swiss long-distance runner named Serge Roetheli sold his home in the shadow of the Alps, laced up his Nikes and took off running. All across the world. He's going to run until early May, right before his 50th birthday, when he and his wife, Nicole, who rides beside him on a motorcycle hauling their belongings in a trailer, return to their hometown near the Matterhorn.
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By Ron Dicker and Ron Dicker,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | December 21, 2000
NEW YORK - Tom Hanks walks into a subterranean room of the Four Seasons Hotel with all the fanfare of a busboy. He has no entourage. He does not crackle with "I'm here" energy. He holds a tall Starbucks coffee and orders an egg-white omelet with American cheese. If he were at home in Malibu on this morning, he might be surfing with "Brentwood housewives," he says, exchanging a hello or a nod between sets. Here at breakfast, Hanks is just as unassuming before he begins a one-day, three-city promotional blitz for his survivalist saga, "Cast Away," opening tomorrow.
NEWS
By DAN BERGER | March 29, 1995
Forrest Gump for President! (You say he already is?)What with the transit strike, it is now fair to say that you went to Philadelphia, and it was closed.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 24, 1995
Here are the results of our completely unscientific poll of Sun readers on who they think will win several major Academy Award categories on Monday, with the vote totals in parentheses. Sun film critic Stephen Hunter will reveal his selections in Sunday's Arts & Entertainment section.PICTURE:"Forrest Gump" (347)"Pulp Fiction" (187)"Four Weddings and a Funeral" (39)"The Shawshank Redemption" (37)"Quiz Show" (24)ACTOR:Tom Hanks, "Forrest Gump" (331)John Travolta, "Pulp Fiction" (152)Morgan Freeman, "The Shawshank Redemption" (70)
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By Deborah Bach and Deborah Bach,SUN STAFF | August 3, 2000
After reading the script for John Waters' latest movie, Patricia Hearst left this message on his answering machine: "You're a sick man." Her reaction is understandable. "Cecil B. DeMented," which had its world premiere last night at the Senator Theatre, is about a band of cinematic guerrillas led by the title character (Stephen Dorff), that kidnaps a famous film star and forces her to wage war on the Hollywood establishment by acting in its production. The cinema terrorists crash a Maryland Film Commission lunch, storm a mall movie theater, and interrupt the filming of "Forrest Gump" - armed with their righteous anger and a full arsenal.
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By Edward Gunts and Edward Gunts,SUN ARCHITECTURE CRITIC | August 23, 1998
Bubba, bubba, toil and trouble.If the witches from "Macbeth" were stirring their caldron in Baltimore's Inner Harbor, they couldn't come up with a more pungent brew than what the Bubba Gump Shrimp Co. has cooked up for the downtown waterfront.This summer's bid by the California-based restaurateur to build its first East Coast branch on a barge in the Inner Harbor has triggered a debate with Shakespearean overtones, as warring factions trade barbs in a rare and ugly public feud.Lords of the National Aquarium in Baltimore contend that construction of a restaurant in the inlet between Inner Harbor Piers 3 and 4 would set a dangerous precedent by blocking water views and preventing them from building a footbridge they need.
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