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NEWS
By Staff Report | February 3, 1993
House Speaker R. Clayton Mitchell Jr. has introduced legislation to regulate all forms of gambling that don't currently come under the state's purview.The bill would establish a state gambling control board that would issue one-year licenses to any organization running a gambling operation, as well as to firms that manufacture and distribute gambling equipment. It would also conduct audits to insure that an appropriate amount of the gambling proceeds was going to charitable organizations.
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NEWS
January 3, 2011
I just spent a wonderful day off in Delaware Park, playing in two poker tournaments, shooting craps and playing blackjack. I actually won a few bucks that I spent in tax-free Delaware. When I returned to Baltimore, I saw that the slots parlor in Ocean City would open soon. Every state around us has full casinos, and we are now getting slots. That is just what we need — another way to tax the poor and the uneducated. There is nothing more mindless than pulling handles all day long, and like the lottery, slots give the worst odds in the casino.
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SPORTS
By Kent Baker and Kent Baker,Sun Staff Writer | March 10, 1994
FORT WASHINGTON -- Members of the Maryland Racing Commission expressed major concern yesterday over the encroachment of casino-type gambling into neighboring states and said they would explore the matter."
SPORTS
By Peter Schmuck | August 9, 2009
Let's all tip our caps to the National Football League and the governing bodies of the other major professional and college sports for taking a principled stand against Delaware's decision to add sports betting to its state lottery system. Yes, of course, I'm joking. The NFL, Major League Baseball, the National Basketball Association, the National Hockey League and the NCAA joined together to file a lawsuit to stop Delaware's new sports betting plan, which would allow single-game wagering at the state's three racinos.
NEWS
February 9, 1993
The Senate Finance Committee should stand firm and vote to kill keno, the fast-action gambling game championed by the Schaefer administration. And the Senate's budget panel ought to lend a hand by showing the governor how to balance the budget without reliance on this addictive game.Casino-style keno isn't confined to closely supervised gambling halls: the lottery agency is hooking up terminals at every convenience store, bar and restaurant it can find.The dangers are obvious. Worcester County was so concerned about taverns offering cheap "happy hour" drinks to patrons for putting money on the keno games every five minutes that it has banned the practice.
NEWS
By Michael Hill and Michael Hill,Staff Writer | March 18, 1993
A Senate committee has approved a bill that would put a 5 percent tax on gambling in Maryland, a levy that also would apply to money dropped into pinball machines, video games and video poker devices.Sponsored by Sen. Julian L. Lapides, D-Baltimore, the measure squeaked by the Budget and Taxation Committee yesterday on a 7-6 vote."Of all the things that have ever been proposed to be taxed, if anything makes any sense, this is it," said Sen. John A. Cade, R-Anne Arundel, a co-sponsor of the bill.
NEWS
By John W. Frece and John W. Frece,Staff Writer | September 28, 1993
Gov. William Donald Schaefer, who opened the door to slot machine gambling on the Eastern Shore when he took office seven years ago, now is looking for a way to shut it a bit before his final term is over.Mr. Schaefer appointed a 17-member task force yesterday to study all forms of gambling in Maryland and to recommend in just two months whether anything needs to be done.John J. Mitchell, a retired Montgomery County circuit judge whom Mr. Schaefer picked to chair the task force, said he has yet to discuss the issue with the governor.
SPORTS
By Ross Peddicord and Ross Peddicord,Staff Writer | January 20, 1994
R. D. Hubbard, principal stockholder in Hollywood Park and likely the next operator of Laurel and Pimlico race courses, is depicted as either a horse racing visionary or a villain.Within the industry, Hubbard is talked about in contradictory terms. On one hand, he is an innovator charting horse racing's course into the 21st century."Dynamic is the one word I'd use to sum him up," said Tony Chamblin, president of the Association of Racing Commissioners International.On the other hand, he is characterized as ruining the sport's traditions by people who still see the horse and all the romanticism that goes with it as racing's main appeal.
NEWS
September 19, 1993
The director of the National Center for Compulsive Gambling calls Maryland's latest lottery venture -- vending machines -- "another governmental scam" to convince people that gambling is fun and a sure way to win easy money. It takes Maryland state government another step closer to sanctioning all forms of gambling.This is a dangerous path for Maryland to follow. Before you know it, these vending machines will be ubiquitous -- at bus stops and subway stations, convenience and food stores, state office buildings and anywhere people congregate.
NEWS
By Tom Bowman and Tom Bowman,Staff Writer | March 17, 1993
Legislation designed to regulate gambling in Maryland cleared a House panel yesterday, although with changes that would exempt many games of chance run by fraternal organizations and charities.Under the measure, regulations would not apply to bingo games run by organizations that do not employ private operators. Also exempt would be such activities as raffles, chance books and paddle wheels.The regulations would cover all commercial bingo parlors, groups that hire private firms to run their bingo games, and organizations that have slot machines, casino nights, tip jars and game boards.
NEWS
By LYNN ANDERSON AND GUS G. SENTEMENTES and LYNN ANDERSON AND GUS G. SENTEMENTES,SUN REPORTERS | November 4, 2005
The e-mail ad promised local poker aficionados the chance to win a $12,000 purse and a trip to the Foxwoods casino in Connecticut to play for even bigger money. But Wednesday night, city police swarmed a refurbished warehouse in South Baltimore, shut the game down and charged 80 players with illegal gambling. Authorities seized $25,655 in cash, 16,020 poker chips, 141 decks of cards, dozens of parts for illegal gambling machines and boxes of illegal booze. A vice sergeant said the raid was the largest in the city in decades, perhaps since 72 people were busted in 1932 during a Prohibition-era raid in Highlandtown.
NEWS
February 24, 2005
Legalizing slots will stick state with a big bill Michael Olesker's column on slots was very perceptive ("Politics' best return for third round of arguing over slots," Feb. 18). I am obliged, however, to take issue with part of his analysis of the gambling issue. Yes, anti-slots folks are inconsistent in "winking a complicit eye" at certain forms of gambling (lotteries and horse racing) while bitterly opposing slots casinos. However, the alternative is to lie down and be steam-rolled flat by every foul enterprise invented by the mind of man. Modern slot machines are designed to quickly addict people to gambling.
NEWS
By MICHAEL OLESKER | April 16, 2004
TEN MINUTES inside Pimlico Race Course, whom do I bump into, expertly marking up his racing form, checking the track conditions and the less-than-heavenly weather, but my rabbi. "You know how it is after Passover," he says, lifting his eyes from his program, where he is calculating the odds with religious fervor. "You need to unwind a little." "Certainly," I say, with equal piety. "Who do you like in the first race?" "Just don't put my name in the paper." "Certainly not." So I won't put his name in the paper if he won't mention my attendance in synagogue, slightly lax since the second Eisenhower administration.
NEWS
By NORRIS WEST | February 6, 2000
Today, pieces of columns-- Anne Arundel County has its quirks. There's the satirical Maritime Republic of Eastport, an Annapolis neighborhood that has "seceded" from the mainland to become a sovereign nation. MRE calls its city council representative an ambassador to Annapolis, which it calls Westport. There's County Executive Janet S. Owens, a smoker from a long line of tobacco farmers,who officially supports anti-smoking campaigns -- and supports them staunchly. And there's commercial bingo.
NEWS
By MICHAEL OLESKER | September 14, 1999
NEWARK, Del. -- In Baltimore, they go to the polls today, but at Delaware Park Racetrack they pull a different kind of lever. The slot machines go ching-a-ling-a-ling, and the Maryland license tags are all over the parking lots, and the money rolls in by the carload.In Baltimore, the candidates for mayor stagger toward the primary campaign finish line, offering one last, exhausted round of promises to improve the schools and clean up the neighborhoods, while hoping nobody notices a projected $153 million deficit around the corner, which is the city's real roll of the dice.
NEWS
June 29, 1998
Makes no difference whether Lotto or slots, gambling's gamblingI have to disagree with the Rev. Frank M. Reid III when he says our governor was right to take a stand against gambling ("Glendening was right to make a stand against gambling," June 23, letters).Every year, millions of dollars go out of the state. They go to Atlantic City casinos and to the slot machines at race tracks in Delaware. This makes sense?Maryland has the Lotto, numbers game, scratch-off tickets and more. What does the reverend call this?
NEWS
February 16, 1993
Alarm bells should be ringing in Annapolis. Why would someone request that 1,500 slot machines be shipped from Nevada -- where such gambling is legal -- to Maryland, where only 52 fraternal clubs on the Eastern Shore are allowed to have a maximum of 260 one-armed bandits? Something's going on beneath the surface that ought to alert legislators and the governor to the dangers of opening Maryland to the corrupting influence of gambling.The attempted slots shipment -- barred by Nevada gambling officials -- has since led the state attorney general's office here to conduct a grand jury probe of the Shore slots, where regulation is minimal and the potential for misbehavior is great.
NEWS
December 18, 1992
Unless Mayor Roland E. "Fish" Powell can stop the state in court, Ocean City soon could lose its image as a family sea-side resort. Big-time gambling, in the form of fast-paced keno, is on its way into town.Mayor Powell isn't the only local official in Maryland concerned about the insidious implications of this vast gambling expansion being pushed by the Schaefer administration. In Westminster, Mayor W. Benjamin Brown wanted to slow the keno invasion by forcing all operators to get a conditional-use permit.
SPORTS
By Kent Baker and Kent Baker,Sun Staff Writer | March 10, 1994
FORT WASHINGTON -- Members of the Maryland Racing Commission expressed major concern yesterday over the encroachment of casino-type gambling into neighboring states and said they would explore the matter."
SPORTS
By Ross Peddicord and Ross Peddicord,Staff Writer | January 20, 1994
R. D. Hubbard, principal stockholder in Hollywood Park and likely the next operator of Laurel and Pimlico race courses, is depicted as either a horse racing visionary or a villain.Within the industry, Hubbard is talked about in contradictory terms. On one hand, he is an innovator charting horse racing's course into the 21st century."Dynamic is the one word I'd use to sum him up," said Tony Chamblin, president of the Association of Racing Commissioners International.On the other hand, he is characterized as ruining the sport's traditions by people who still see the horse and all the romanticism that goes with it as racing's main appeal.
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