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By Vida Roberts | November 14, 1993
Today's black-tie dressing appears to be about everything but the tie.That bit of silk at the neck has lost its importance, and the focus now is on accessories that have been reinvented or borrowed from the ladies. The possibilities for originality are endless for the creatively fashionable male, but may present problems for the man who does formal wear by the old formulas.The idea is to relax, enjoy the less restrictive social climate and put some fun into dress for festive occasions. A little thought makes sense, too.* Resist looks that make you uncomfortable.
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BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella, The Baltimore Sun | September 3, 2014
The Men's Wearhouse plans to end the contract that supplies tuxedo rental inventory to Hampstead-based subsidiary Jos. A. Bank, the Houston-based men's retailer said Wednesday. Men's Wearhouse, which acquired Bank in June for $1.8 billion, said an early termination agreement between Bank and Illinois-based tuxedo wholesaler Jim's Formal Wear will take effect Dec. 31. The menswear chain will take a one-time charge of $4.5 million in its fiscal third quarter as a result. "As of January 1, 2015 we will be leveraging our internal tuxedo rental inventory and logistics to serve the Jos. A. Bank tuxedo operations," Men's Wearhouse president and CEO Doug Ewert said in the announcement.
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NEWS
By JUDY REILLY | May 11, 1995
Where can you find a beautiful prom or bridal party dress for less than $30? Or buy a silk, beaded, drop-dead-gorgeous wedding gown for less than $400? Or buy a dress worn by a former Miss America?Entrepreneur Chris Page of Union Bridge has the answers to these questions, and she's ready to help you find the dress of your dreams for the prom, senior dance, even your wedding. And you'll find it without spending a fortune.Mrs. Page has opened Christine Ann's Formal Fashions, a consignment shop in nearby Hanover, Pa., and she's having a great time finding the very new or nearly new merchandise that might make a woman's dream come true, even if her last name isn't Trump.
NEWS
By Erica L. Green, The Baltimore Sun | May 3, 2014
Daja Dorsey had a list of things she was looking for in the perfect prom dress. And as the senior at Baltimore's Coppin Academy High School perused racks of dresses Saturday, looking for something short and sparkly, she was relieved to have at least one thing crossed off: an affordable price tag. Dorsey walked away from the Baltimore Teachers Union headquarters - where high school seniors were invited to come shop through donated formal wear -...
NEWS
By KAREN NITKIN and KAREN NITKIN,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | April 26, 2006
This is a busy time of year for Kings Contrivance Formal Wear. Prom season is starting, and the big wedding months of May and June are around the corner. That means people are renting or buying tuxedos and having their suits and prom dresses tailored at the 13-year-old shop. Early Monday morning, a steady stream of customers entered the small but tidy store that is filled with racks of dark suits. A few men had come in to pick up suits that had been altered. A mother had questions about the tuxedo her son would need for his prom.
BUSINESS
By Ross Hetrick and Ross Hetrick,Staff Writer | September 12, 1992
Charles S. Ezrine, a Baltimore entrepreneur who was thwarted in his effort to bring After Six Inc. to Maryland, has joined in a suit against the Philadelphia tuxedo maker charging that it is interfering in his efforts to set up a firm to distribute formal wear.The suit, filed yesterday in U.S. District Court in Baltimore, comes three weeks after Mr. Ezrine pulled out of a deal to buy After Six and move it to the recently closed Gleneagles rainwear plant in Bel Air.He said the persistent and aggressive opposition by the union representing the company's workers in Philadelphia was primarily to blame for the deal's failure.
FEATURES
By Donna Peremes | September 16, 1990
The social scene really heats up in Baltimore com September. New seasons for symphony and stage and lots of black-tie benefits and balls attract those who choose to schmooze stylishly.Paula Brauer, a salesperson at Gingiss Formal Wear in White Marsh Mall, says business certainly does increase around this time of year, with the majority of Baltimore men still opting for traditional black-tie garb -- basic black tuxedos or cutaways, worn with black ties and cummerbunds -- practical, chic, sure-fire dressing.
BUSINESS
By Ross Hetrick and Ross Hetrick,Staff Writer | July 7, 1993
Charles S. Ezrine, the Baltimore tire merchant turned formal-wear entrepreneur, has finally gotten his wish to distribute After Six formal wear, after the Philadelphia company was sold in a bankruptcy proceeding.Under an arrangement reached last month, After Six tuxedos are being distributed by Park Avenue Formals Inc., a Baltimore County company headed by Mr. Ezrine.The capture of the After Six business came nine months after Mr. Ezrine was thwarted in an attempt to buy the business and move its production to a closed clothing factory in Harford County.
BUSINESS
By Ross Hetrick and Ross Hetrick,Staff Writer | September 4, 1992
Union opposition has helped scuttle the sale of After Six, the country's largest tuxedo maker, to a group of investors who wanted to move the operation and hundreds of jobs from Philadelphia to Harford County."
FEATURES
By Knight-Ridder Newspapers | December 12, 1990
Although the fashion minds at Gieves & Hawkes makers of traditionally tailored men's suits are too conservative for our tastes, we believe that, when in doubt, conservative is much more appealing than outlandish. Since we'll all be dressing up a bit more during the holiday season and probably picking up a few additions to our wardrobes (did someone say recession?), we offer several men's styling tips from Gieves & Hawkes along with a few of our own favorites:* Buy the best you can afford.
NEWS
By John E. McIntyre and The Baltimore Sun | April 1, 2013
Each week The Sun's John McIntyre presents a relatively obscure but evocative word with which you may not be familiar, another brick to add to the wall of your working vocabulary. This week's word: BLUESTOCKING In the middle of the eighteenth century, a group of women that included Elizabeth Vesey, Hannah More, Elizabeth Montagu, and Elizabeth Carter conducted evening parties at which literary subjects were discussed. Gentlemen also attended, and one regular, the botanist Benjamin Stillingfleet, habitually wore blue worsted stockings instead of the black silk customary in formal wear.
NEWS
By KAREN NITKIN and KAREN NITKIN,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | April 26, 2006
This is a busy time of year for Kings Contrivance Formal Wear. Prom season is starting, and the big wedding months of May and June are around the corner. That means people are renting or buying tuxedos and having their suits and prom dresses tailored at the 13-year-old shop. Early Monday morning, a steady stream of customers entered the small but tidy store that is filled with racks of dark suits. A few men had come in to pick up suits that had been altered. A mother had questions about the tuxedo her son would need for his prom.
NEWS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins and Jamie Smith Hopkins,SUN STAFF | November 28, 2000
Alda Baptiste has altered her last wedding dress and is clearing out the leftover veils and beaded shoes, preparing to close one of the oldest businesses in Ellicott City's historic district. After 32 years selling first fabric, then dresses she designed, then ready-made formal wear, she is retiring from the business that bears her name. The 19th-century mill town - with its nearly biblical fires and floods - hasn't always been the best place to work. Twice, her merchandise was ruined when the Patapsco River rose and engulfed Main Street buildings.
BUSINESS
By Mark Guidera and Mark Guidera,SUN STAFF | April 12, 1997
On more than a few occasions, Stanley Hiken found himself racing to a wedding to rescue a frantic bridegroom from appearing in a crowded church without a bow tie, cummerbund or dress shoes.And the businessman can't count the number of times that he's calmed a worried parent by personally delivering to the home a tuxedo or its missing formal dress accouterments so a son could be properly attired for a high school graduation or prom.But the East Baltimore family's rich history spanning seven decades and dedication to the formal-wear business has run its course.
NEWS
By Marilyn McCraven and Marilyn McCraven,SUN STAFF | March 3, 1997
Nine-year-old LaMont Mantilla, whose idea of fun is dunking a basketball, recently used his hand-eye coordination in another fun pursuit: operating a sewing machine."
FEATURES
By Mary Corey and Mary Corey,SUN STAFF | March 7, 1996
When Nancy Spence walked into an auto body shop five years ago, little did she know she'd find a fiance and a new style.But since she started dating Jerry Casciero, owner of the shop and a professional motorcycle racer, Ms. Spence has added "pit crew" attire to her collection of business classics. The administrative director of the Child Abuse Prevention Center of Maryland also has upgraded her beau's clothes -- without changing his essential look."That's part of who he is and I appreciate it," says Ms. Spence, 40, who lives in Bel Air. "But I don't want him to spend all his time in T-shirts and jeans."
NEWS
By John E. McIntyre and The Baltimore Sun | April 1, 2013
Each week The Sun's John McIntyre presents a relatively obscure but evocative word with which you may not be familiar, another brick to add to the wall of your working vocabulary. This week's word: BLUESTOCKING In the middle of the eighteenth century, a group of women that included Elizabeth Vesey, Hannah More, Elizabeth Montagu, and Elizabeth Carter conducted evening parties at which literary subjects were discussed. Gentlemen also attended, and one regular, the botanist Benjamin Stillingfleet, habitually wore blue worsted stockings instead of the black silk customary in formal wear.
FEATURES
By Valli Herman and Valli Herman,Los Angeles Daily News | December 26, 1990
Even the word sounds uptight formal. Dressing up shouldn't have to mean stressing up.The key to calm is knowing what type of attire is expected at the event. Of course, that's not always so simple. Even the staid tuxedo changes to reflect fashion, with fabrics, silhouettes and accessories absorbing the look of the moment. Women's formal wear may seem safe if it's sparkly, but it also sways with the fleeing fashion breezes.What's a fashion-forward person to do? Relax. This isn't that hard.
NEWS
By Judy Reilly and Judy Reilly,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | November 9, 1995
THIS TIME of year finds many of us making the rounds from shop to shop, looking for the perfect gifts for family and friends, as well as decorations to brighten our homes for the holidays.Those who live in northwest Carroll are especially lucky to have an abundance of offerings practically within shouting distance of our back doors.On a leisurely Sunday drive down country roads, I recently discovered the Biglerville Country Store in nearby Biglerville, Pa.The town is noted for its annual Apple Festival; the country store is an attraction by itself.
BUSINESS
By Ross Hetrick and Ross Hetrick,Sun Staff Writer | August 3, 1995
*TC James J. Stankovic, the former head of the Owings Mills menswear maker J. Schoeneman Inc., will now try his hand at tuxedos as the new president and chief executive officer of After Six Ltd.Mr. Stankovic, 52, replaces Saul B. Offit, who was one of the principals who bought the name of the Philadelphia-based company in 1993 and established its headquarters in the Golden Ring area of Baltimore County.Along with Mr. Stankovic's appointment, the company said it was undergoing a $16 million financial restructuring to handle its growing business.
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