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Forgotten War

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By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | September 7, 2014
If the War of 1812 is the forgotten war, then the landing of the British near Dundalk is perhaps a battle few ever knew even happened. But to thousands of visitors to Fort Howard this weekend, the Battle of North Point was vivid - they felt the echoes of gunfire in their chests as they watched reenactments of a confrontation between British forces and Baltimore militia. The Dundalk-Patapsco Neck Historical Society holds the event annually, though it grew this year in commemoration of the battle's bicentennial - just days before this week's Star-Spangled Spectacular.
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By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | September 7, 2014
If the War of 1812 is the forgotten war, then the landing of the British near Dundalk is perhaps a battle few ever knew even happened. But to thousands of visitors to Fort Howard this weekend, the Battle of North Point was vivid - they felt the echoes of gunfire in their chests as they watched reenactments of a confrontation between British forces and Baltimore militia. The Dundalk-Patapsco Neck Historical Society holds the event annually, though it grew this year in commemoration of the battle's bicentennial - just days before this week's Star-Spangled Spectacular.
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NEWS
July 27, 1995
Forty-two years after it ended, the Korean War is finally getting its monument in Washington.United States troops still stationed in South Korea -- 37,000 strong today -- serve as a constant reminder of "America's forgotten war." Yet there has been no memorial in our nation's capital to that terrible conflict in which a generation of Americans paid a dreadful price.In three years in Korea, there were 137,000 American casualties (compared to 200,000 in eight-and-a-half years in Vietnam; more than 8,000 Americans are still listed as missing in action in Korea, five times the number for Vietnam)
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By David Zurawik, The Baltimore Sun | October 11, 2011
While the War of 1812 might be known as "America's Forgotten War" elsewhere, that's definitely not the case in Baltimore and Maryland. Our obsession with all things 1812 is one of the regional characteristics so pronounced that it is lampooned in "The Second City Does Baltimore" satire now running at Center Stage . And Monday night, area viewers will have the chance to feed that appetite with two hours of a carefully researched documentary about...
NEWS
By Michael Ollove and Sarah Lindenfeld and Michael Ollove and Sarah Lindenfeld,Sun Staff Writers | July 28, 1995
WASHINGTON -- America ensured yesterday that its forgotten war will always be remembered.Forty-two years after the armistice was signed to end the Korean War, a new memorial to the American servicemen who fought in that conflict was dedicated on the Washington Mall. It is a monument that most Korean War veterans believe was long overdue."We never cried; we never grumped, we just waited," said Bill Audet, 63, a gaunt, retired postal worker from Maine who stormed ashore at Inchon harbor as a young Marine in September 1950.
NEWS
By Chicago Tribune | July 27, 1993
TONGDUCHON, South Korea -- Historians have called the three-year "police action" that ended 40 years ago this week "The Forgotten War," "The Hidden War" and "The Unknown War."For U.S. soldiers stationed next to the North Korean border, the lessons of the Korean War are anything but forgotten.Each day, some of the 7,600 men in the 2nd Infantry Division -- the advanced detachment of the 36,000 U.S. troops remaining in South Korea -- prepare for a tank assault from the north."You hear a lot here about the mistakes of the past," said Spec.
NEWS
By David Nitkin and David Nitkin,SUN STAFF | November 12, 2003
Some call it the forgotten war, but for Crofton resident Paul E. Kim, the description is anything but accurate. "It's memories all my life," said Kim, 73, a former South Korean Army soldier who fought alongside American troops to protect his homeland from communism. A bullet found him during a ambush by a Chinese unit, and Kim believes he is fortunate to be alive. "My young days are there," Kim says of the Asian peninsula where the United States fought for three years in a conflict never elevated beyond the status of police action by President Harry S. Truman.
NEWS
By Eileen Ryan and Eileen Ryan,Sun staff | June 11, 2000
The Catholic bishop had wrapped the straw rope around his waist, and the Methodist missionary tied himself to the other end. The two men shuffled along the pass in Korea's Kang Nam mountains, shivering in their summer clothes, leaning against each other for support. The snow along the trail was smeared with blood where the bishop's shoes had worn through. In front of them were more than 750 American soldiers. Behind were 57 other foreign civilians, including a 9-month- old baby and an 82-year-old priest, struggling to keep up. All during that terrible day, as more and more young GIs fell to the side of the path, Bishop Patrick James Byrne pleaded with them to resume the march.
NEWS
By Dan Fesperman and Dan Fesperman,SUN STAFF | June 25, 2000
For 43 years, the old gang from the 7th Infantry Division wondered what had happened to their buddy Foy Garris, the moonshiner's boy from North Carolina. Dead, they figured. Wasted away by the fever that left him sagging in a ditch in 1951 while they surged north across the 38th parallel, toward their own little hells. Years later they checked a few archives but found nothing and gave up. Wars are like that. Buddies die or get separated. Fathers and sons vanish without a trace, or come home with so little to say that their families wonder what must have happened.
NEWS
By MICHAEL HILL and MICHAEL HILL,SUN REPORTER | April 16, 2006
The United States military overwhelms an outmatched opponent, easily taking the capital city of a country half a world away. Mission accomplished, or so it seems. Actually, it was the beginning of a protracted guerrilla war, years of bloody fighting that led to allegations of brutality on the battlefield and widespread protests and political controversy at home. It is not Iraq that Johns Hopkins University historian Paul Kramer is writing about; it is the Philippines. His newly published book The Blood of Government: Race, Empire, the United States and the Philippines tells the story of a war fought as the 19th century turned into the 20th that is largely left out of the history books.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare, The Baltimore Sun | September 3, 2011
Many call the Battle of North Point, when the Maryland militia faced thousands of invading British soldiers, the forgotten battle in a nearly forgotten war. But Sunday, nearly 200 years after that pivotal encounter in the War of 1812, thousands will remember as they gather at Fort Howard Park in Edgemere. Not far from the ground where Marylanders fought British troops, they will observe the annual Defenders Day with re-enactments, living history displays, patriotic anthems, even commemorative stamps.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare, The Baltimore Sun | July 11, 2010
Maryland will revel in its War of 1812 history with a two-year celebration of the pivotal battles, enduring sites and hometown heroes that played a role in the conflict that culminated in America's defeat of the world's strongest military force. Boston remembers annually the events that sparked the Revolutionary War and Virginia recently marked the 400 t h anniversary of its founding at Jamestown. Now the 200-year-old war with the British that ultimately ended on Maryland's shores will take on renewed significance as communities across the state focus on stories many have forgotten.
NEWS
By Mary Carole McCauley and Mary Gail Hare, The Baltimore Sun | May 29, 2010
When 6-year-old Connor Johns visits Dulaney Valley Memorial Gardens on Monday, he will be wearing the combat fatigues that his half-brother, Jordan, picked out for him before he was deployed in Afghanistan. "He wears that outfit constantly," said Kandy Poole Johns, the boys' mother. "Connor loved Jordan, looked up to him as his hero and will always remember him as a Marine." Twenty-four-year-old Lance Cpl. Jordan Chrobot of Frederick, who died last Sept. 26 during a firefight in Helmand province, was one of 10 Marylanders killed in Afghanistan since last Memorial Day. The state's 12-month toll is the highest since the United States launched Operation Enduring Freedom in response to the attacks of Sept.
NEWS
By MICHAEL HILL and MICHAEL HILL,SUN REPORTER | April 16, 2006
The United States military overwhelms an outmatched opponent, easily taking the capital city of a country half a world away. Mission accomplished, or so it seems. Actually, it was the beginning of a protracted guerrilla war, years of bloody fighting that led to allegations of brutality on the battlefield and widespread protests and political controversy at home. It is not Iraq that Johns Hopkins University historian Paul Kramer is writing about; it is the Philippines. His newly published book The Blood of Government: Race, Empire, the United States and the Philippines tells the story of a war fought as the 19th century turned into the 20th that is largely left out of the history books.
NEWS
By David Nitkin and David Nitkin,SUN STAFF | November 12, 2003
Some call it the forgotten war, but for Crofton resident Paul E. Kim, the description is anything but accurate. "It's memories all my life," said Kim, 73, a former South Korean Army soldier who fought alongside American troops to protect his homeland from communism. A bullet found him during a ambush by a Chinese unit, and Kim believes he is fortunate to be alive. "My young days are there," Kim says of the Asian peninsula where the United States fought for three years in a conflict never elevated beyond the status of police action by President Harry S. Truman.
NEWS
By Dan Fesperman and Dan Fesperman,SUN STAFF | June 25, 2000
For 43 years, the old gang from the 7th Infantry Division wondered what had happened to their buddy Foy Garris, the moonshiner's boy from North Carolina. Dead, they figured. Wasted away by the fever that left him sagging in a ditch in 1951 while they surged north across the 38th parallel, toward their own little hells. Years later they checked a few archives but found nothing and gave up. Wars are like that. Buddies die or get separated. Fathers and sons vanish without a trace, or come home with so little to say that their families wonder what must have happened.
NEWS
By Consella A. Lee and Consella A. Lee,SUN STAFF | May 8, 1996
The crowd at the Glen Burnie Memorial Day Parade may wave flags and cheer as the bands and other marching units go by, but the grand marshal hopes the spectators also will remember men such as his best friend, Sgt. William Ford, who was cut down in the prime of his life in Korea.After all, said Boris R. Spiroff, the holiday is intended to pay "tribute to the people who died, who gave their lives for freedom."The parade committee chose Spiroff for grand marshal because of the wartime exploits described in his book "Korea: Frozen Hell On Earth," said Joseph Corcoran, parade chairman.
NEWS
By THEO LIPPMAN JR | August 2, 1993
THE 40TH anniversary of SK Day came and went last week, neglected as usual, despite what President Clinton said.SK Day -- the initials stand for Stalemate in Korea -- is, I'll admit, not as big a deal as VE Day and VJ Day, but it and the war it ended deserve some respect.That war gets none. It's the Rodney Dangerfield of wars. It was not even called a war while it was being fought. Today, 40 years after its armistice, there is still no Korean War Memorial in the nation's capital. That finally is going to change.
NEWS
By Eileen Ryan and Eileen Ryan,Sun staff | June 11, 2000
The Catholic bishop had wrapped the straw rope around his waist, and the Methodist missionary tied himself to the other end. The two men shuffled along the pass in Korea's Kang Nam mountains, shivering in their summer clothes, leaning against each other for support. The snow along the trail was smeared with blood where the bishop's shoes had worn through. In front of them were more than 750 American soldiers. Behind were 57 other foreign civilians, including a 9-month- old baby and an 82-year-old priest, struggling to keep up. All during that terrible day, as more and more young GIs fell to the side of the path, Bishop Patrick James Byrne pleaded with them to resume the march.
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