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Forgiveness

NEWS
June 16, 1999
WHEN the Group of Seven government leaders meet in Cologne, Germany, on Friday, beating back the Asian recession will be the foremost concern, followed by reconstruction in the Balkans.The $107 billion debt of the 700 million people in the 42 poorest nations will not loom large when the numbers involved in Japan's potential recovery are tossed about. This debt (including $7.8 billion to the International Monetary Fund, $38.6 billion to the World Bank and $6 billion to the United States) is the biggest problem only to the debtors.
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NEWS
March 15, 2000
WE cannot not recognize the betrayals of the Gospel committed by some of our brothers, especially during the second millennium. We ask forgiveness for the divisions between Christians, for the use of violence that some have resorted to in the service of truth and for the acts of dissidence and of hostility sometimes taken towards followers of other religions."
NEWS
May 26, 2000
JOHN SNOWDEN didn't ask for forgiveness. He asked for more than that. An African-American accused of killing a pregnant white woman, he asked people to believe that he didn't do it. He asked the jury that convicted him in a racially charged, controversial trial. And he asked the throng that watched him drop four feet to his death, the last person to die on Anne Arundel County's gallows. Snowden didn't get what he wanted and never will, even in death. His conviction will stand. But his advocates are seeking the next best thing to a proclamation of innocence.
NEWS
October 15, 2003
IT WILL BE HARD to forgive the man who held a gun to a woman's head, slapped a priest and stole the Sunday collections at the Shrine of the Little Flower Roman Catholic Church in Northeast Baltimore on Monday morning. He lied to the woman who answered his knock on the door, telling her he wanted to make a donation. He threatened her with harm, and did harm to the Rev. Michael J. Orchik, who wasn't fast enough in recalling the combination to open the safe. He stole cash and checks for purposes likely bad that hundreds of parishioners intended be used for good.
NEWS
By Susan Baer and Susan Baer,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | September 10, 1998
WASHINGTON -- Delivering his most contrite public comments to date regarding his actions in the Monica Lewinsky matter, President Clinton asked for forgiveness from a group of Democratic supporters yesterday, saying he had let them down but hoped to redeem their trust."
NEWS
By Rona S. Hirsch and Rona S. Hirsch,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | September 6, 2002
Forgiveness, spiritual elevation and acts of righteousness are as much a part of Rosh Hashana as the sounding of a ram's horn, eating matzo ball soup and dipping an apple in honey. As Jews across Howard County prepare for the Jewish New Year, several Columbia rabbis will try to inspire congregants into doing better this year. The two-day holiday begins at sundown today and ends Sunday after nightfall. "There's always forgiveness in Judaism," said Rabbi Susan Grossman of Beth Shalom Synagogue.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,Sun Staff Writer | April 24, 1994
Mark N. Wadel established a mission at the Carroll County Detention Center about a year ago with trepidation, a Bible in his hand and one thought on his mind."
NEWS
By John Rivera and John Rivera,SUN STAFF | December 6, 2000
Acknowledging the complicity of the Roman Catholic Church and its members in such social evils as slavery and racial segregation, Cardinal William H. Keeler will lead a prayer of repentance tonight, asking forgiveness for the sins of racism and indifference to the poor. During a prayer service that begins at 7 p.m. at the Basilica of the Assumption of the Blessed Virgin Mary, at Cathedral and Mulberry streets downtown, Keeler will admit that Catholics "have been guilty of attitudes of rejection and exclusion, consenting to acts of discrimination and even enslavement on the basis of racial difference."
NEWS
By Michael Hill and Michael Hill,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | October 27, 1996
JOHANNESBURG, South Africa -- Until last week's startling evidence against the former apartheid government -- from its own perpetrators of violence -- South Africa's Truth and Reconciliation Commission seemed destined to become little more than background noise in the cacophony of transition.The commission is designed to bring forth confessions of the brutal truth from the henchmen of apartheid -- the period in this country's history from 1960 to 1993 when white supremacy was the law and thousands died in the struggle against it. People would testify in exchange for amnesty in the hope that this will help to heal the awful wounds of the past.
SPORTS
January 15, 2013
Throw the book at him Philip Hersh Chicago Tribune Before assuming Lance Armstrong comes fully clean, not to Oprah Winfrey but to the U.S. Anti-Doping Agency under oath — quite an assumption, given his decade of lies — it is worth noting there is a rule covering reinstatement. The World Anti-Doping Code allows reduction in the period of ineligibility for a person who provides "substantial assistance in discovering or establishing anti-doping rule violations. " In the case of a lifetime ban, as Armstrong received, the code says the new ban must be no less than eight years.
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