Advertisement
HomeCollectionsForging
IN THE NEWS

Forging

FEATURED ARTICLES
SPORTS
October 8, 1991
C ?
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By Alison Knezevich and The Baltimore Sun | October 6, 2014
The historic Rodgers Forge neighborhood in Towson has adopted guidelines for residents who want to install solar panels, an effort community leaders hope can strike a balance between preserving the community's architecture and embracing alternative energy. A committee of the Rodgers Forge Community Association worked for about a year to come up with the recommendations, which the full board approved in September, according to immediate past president Stu Sirota. "I think this shows that Rodgers Forge is a progressive neighborhood that cares about its history and maintaining the architectural integrity of its homes, while still being able to allow a modern and innovative green technology," Sirota said.
Advertisement
NEWS
By Nancy A. Youssef and Nancy A. Youssef,SUN STAFF | May 4, 2000
Police have arrested a 42-year-old Social Security Administration employee after investigating claims that she forged $15,000 in checks written to the agency and placed them into her bank account, Baltimore County police said. Authorities said the investigation is continuing and might involve more than $50,000 in checks. Police had not released the woman's name as of last night, saying she had not been formally charged. She was being held at the North Point Precinct, police said. The woman was taken into custody at her rowhouse in the 200 block of Murdock Road in Rodgers Forge.
NEWS
By Karen Arnett de Rodriguez and krodasada@gmail.com | September 24, 2014
Our community has much to celebrate. Many congratulations and much merriment in the Forge during the last month of one of our nicest summers on record. And it was fantastic weather for a wedding. Just ask Harrison Levy and Sara Mosgin , new residents of Brandon Road. On Aug. 23 they promised to love, honor and live happily ever after in good times, like a picnic lunch by a beautiful lake, and challenging times, such as a heart-pumping, breath-catching 3-mile hike up a Colorado mountainside (which is how Harrison proposed)
NEWS
By Richard Irwin and Richard Irwin,SUN STAFF | October 21, 1995
A Cockeysville man was charged Thursday with stealing at least $3,000 by forging his name on checks that were written to pay utility and credit card bills, Baltimore County police said.The checks were stolen from the lobbies of apartment buildings from piles of mail that were to be picked up by the U.S. Postal Service, police said."After steaming open the envelopes, the man used a felt-tip pen to write his name through the firm to be paid, then endorsed the check at the bank on which the account was drawn," said Officer William Ruth.
NEWS
By PETER HERMANN | April 22, 2009
The problem with plea bargains is not always that the guilty get breaks but that the best lawyerly arguments stay forever muffled. I was prepared Monday for one of those great debates, in the most unlikely of places: the halls of justice at the John R. Hargrove Sr. District Court building on Patapsco Avenue in Brooklyn. But the prosecutor and the big-name defense attorney made a deal, no matter that they disagreed completely on who would have prevailed at trial. That's how the case of Nicholas Foster, who became an object of vitriol when he was charged with forging a coveted parking pass for the car-clogged streets of South Baltimore's Otterbein and trying to sell it on Craigslist, ended with a perfunctory nod from Judge Charles A. Chiapparelli and both sides claiming victory.
NEWS
By Cassandra A. Fortin and Cassandra A. Fortin,Special to The Sun | May 13, 2007
After taking some blacksmithing classes about 25 years ago, Nick Vincent began forging iron in his backyard after work. In time, says Vincent, who was working full time at the Chesapeake & Potomac Telephone Co., the forging became too much and about 16 years ago he decided that something had to go - either his job of 20 years or blacksmithing. Vincent chose to keep forging and never looked back. "I am my own boss, and I get to create things," the 55-year-old Uniontown man said. "I love working in front of the fire in the summer when it's 107 degrees outside.
SPORTS
By Edward Lee and Edward Lee,SUN REPORTER | November 23, 2006
Time, contrary to what the Rolling Stones sang, is not on the side of the Pittsburgh Steelers. Despite forging consecutive comeback victories in the past two weeks, the reigning Super Bowl champion Steelers are 4-6 with only six regular-season games left. Steelers@Ravens Sunday, 1 p.m., Ch. 13, 1090 AM, 97.9 FM Line: Ravens by 3
NEWS
By Alisa Samuels and Alisa Samuels,Staff Writer | October 16, 1992
Howard County police have charged a 39-year-old Columbia woman with 27 counts of prescription-related fraud after an investigation showed she allegedly forged prescriptions and got pain-killers by posing as a health care worker.Barbara Flowers Maestas, of the 6500 block of Quilting Way in the Village of Owen Brown, was charged with forging prescriptions this year and obtaining controlled dangerous substances by fraud, according to Howard County District Court records.The maximum penalty for forging a prescription is two years in prison; the maximum penalty for obtaining a controlled dangerous substance by fraud is four years and a $25,000 fine.
NEWS
March 6, 1998
A Westminster man received two suspended two-year sentences and was placed on probation for a year after pleading guilty yesterday to forging two checks in January.Michael J. Graham, 25, of the first block of Sullivan Road paid $300 in restitution yesterday and must pay an additional $89 by Monday or risk a probation violation, said Circuit Judge Raymond E. Beck Sr.Graham also must pay court costs within six months.FireWestminster: Firefighters from Reese, Pleasant Valley and Reisterstown in Baltimore County assisted Westminster at 6: 45 p.m. Wednesday, responding to a building fire in the 800 block of Baltimore Blvd.
NEWS
By Jessica Anderson, The Baltimore Sun | August 27, 2014
Calling the shooting a "simply cold-blooded execution," a Baltimore County judge sentenced Dante Antonio Woods to life without parole on Wednesday for a fatal shooting in Rodgers Forge last summer. Prosecutors said Woods — who was 22 at the time — gunned down Donte Stephens, 36, on July 17, 2013, outside his home in the 100 block of Murdock Road, where he lived with his girlfriend and her daughter, who had a 5-year-old son with Woods. Judge Sherrie R. Bailey said it's "rare to see homicide cases where there is this much time to think and consider one's actions.
NEWS
July 31, 2014
The limits of growth has been a constant theme in Towson news over recent years, mostly focusing on major redevelopment downtown. Meanwhile, the same issue is also a sore spot a little farther south - around Towson University. The discomfort over "boom town" expansion felt by residents near Towson's core is shared by residents of Rodgers Forge, which borders TU. The current flash point has been discussion over a proposed $2 million in improvements to a softball field. TU officials say the upgrade is necessary for the university to meet equal facilities requirements under Title IX. Worrisome to Rodgers Forge residents is part of the design that includes an electrical conduit, which they fear could mean the installation of lights in the future - a hot button issue in the suburban enclave.
NEWS
By Karen Arnett de Rodriguez, krodasada@gmail.com | July 16, 2014
This is the story of Stewart "Stu" McCullouch III , part-time Rodgers Forge resident, retired Air Force captain, aerospace engineer, triathlete and aspiring Ironman. Sounds intimidating, but truly, if you met him you would never know most of these accomplishments because boasting doesn't suit his character. You would simply think him the most jovial, salt-of-the-earth man you ever met. And maybe you did meet him during his annual part-time residency on Stanmore Road where he would stay with his daughter.
NEWS
By Colin Campbell, The Baltimore Sun | June 29, 2014
Some of the residents of the Rodgers Forge neighborhood that borders Towson University's softball stadium are alumni of the school and fans of the Tigers. They understand the university's desire to build a $2 million new facility this summer and bring the program up to NCAA Title IX standards. They just don't want it 25 feet from their backyards. The roughly two-dozen neighbors, who last month formed an ad-hoc committee to protest a new complex, rallied outside the university Saturday morning, saying the school has refused to negotiate with them on the plans.
NEWS
By Justin Fenton, The Baltimore Sun | June 27, 2014
When Baltimore Police Commissioner Anthony Batts appeared at a recent town hall, a woman stood to ask about police brutality, a touchy topic for both residents and officers. She said she worried for her young nephew, who was frequently stopped by police. Batts' 10-minute answer ranged from the personal to the practical. He talked about his upbringing in South Central Los Angeles, drawing laughs about the fried bologna sandwiches his family ate to survive. He explained why people must sit cross-legged on curbs for officer safety, but understood police interactions can be demeaning for those detained.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Andrew Zaleski | June 17, 2014
Last winter, Rachel Millman began searching for a home in Baltimore. She combed through listings online, but the work of narrowing down her search based on static images became tedious. What if, instead, she could take a video tour through each house, and use a slightly more dynamic medium to decide whether to schedule an in-person tour? When Millman closed on her new home in Canton this year, having already pitched her idea to a number of receptive real estate agents she had met along the way, she knew this was the right moment.
NEWS
September 17, 2000
Konrad Kujau, 62, who admitted forging the bogus "Hitler diaries" published in 1983 by Stern magazine, died of stomach cancer Tuesday in Stuttgart, Germany. The gallery owner and painter gained notoriety 17 years ago, after it was revealed he had counterfeited 60 volumes purported to be the personal diaries of Adolf Hitler. The forgeries were excerpted in Stern, which paid $4.8 million for the volumes, believing them to be authentic. Experts soon denounced them as crude fakes. Mr. Kujau was sentenced to 4 1/2 years in prison for fraud in 1985.
NEWS
By Darren M. Allen and Darren M. Allen,Sun Staff Writer | May 12, 1994
A 37-year-old Reisterstown man pleaded guilty yesterday to forging and cashing nearly $3,300 worth of his grandmother's personal checks.Lonnie Layton Price Jr. -- who is serving time in the Baltimore County Detention Center on a drunken-driving conviction -- entered his plea to one count of felony theft by scheme before Carroll Circuit Judge Raymond E. Beck Sr.As part of a plea bargain, Judge Beck sentenced Price to seven years in prison but suspended five...
NEWS
By Loni Ingraham | May 6, 2014
Jerry Truelove and a dozen of his Rodgers Forge neighbors have formed an ad hoc committee to negotiate with TU about a planned women's softball stadium. They claim the new construction will destroy their quality of life and decrease their property values and they want to see the stadium built elsewhere on the 328-acre campus, where it won't impact any homes. On a recent Sunday afternoon, Jerry Truelove stood  in the backyard of his Stanmore Court home near an 8-foot-high fence that separates Rodgers Forge from the Towson University campus when a ball dropped from the tree branches.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | April 29, 2014
Charles W. "Chuck" Battenfeld Jr., a retired Canton Railroad Co. executive, died April 23 of heart failure at his Rodgers Forge home. He was 95. His wife of 70 years, Mary Jeannette Battenfeld, a homemaker and an accomplished seamstress, died four days later of Alzheimer's disease at College Manor Nursing Home in Lutherville. She was 92. The son of a carpet installer and a homemaker, Charles Wesley Battenfeld Jr. was born in Baltimore and raised in Govans. After graduating in 1936 from City College, he began his 44-year railroad career working as a yard checker for the Canton Railroad Co., an industrial railroad that once operated 39 miles of track in Baltimore and Baltimore County.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.