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By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,Evening Sun Staff | November 8, 1991
Campfires, cigarette smoking and off-road vehicles were banned in Allegany County's Green Ridge State Forest yesterday, where firefighters battled two forest fires as tinderbox conditions set the stage for more.The Maryland Emergency Management Agency has banned open burning throughout Allegany and Garrett counties because of the rising danger of forest fires."The woods from the lower Shore to Garrett County are extremely dry," said Deputy State Fire Marshal Robert B. Thomas Jr."We have really not seen any measureable amounts of rainfall throughout Maryland in over six weeks, and in Western Maryland for longer than that," he said.
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Editorial from The Aegis | April 4, 2013
The heat of summertime is when roaring wildfires are fodder for reports on the national news, but for a few weeks in early spring and mid autumn, the outdoor conditions in northeastern Maryland make this area prone to field and woods fires. Late last week, and earlier this week brush fires were put out in wooded areas in Joppatowne and Fallston. Other fires have kept the volunteer fire service busy, and can be expected to do so for another two or three weeks. In the past, Maryland Forest Service staff have explained that in the springtime, a combination of factors make the outdoors vulnerable to errant sparks.
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NEWS
By Tom Horton and Tom Horton,SUN STAFF | July 10, 1998
DISASTERS are seldom what they first seem.Famines are less about failed crops than about the politics and inequities that impede sharing food in a bounteous world.The environmental impact of large oil spills often is less than the damage done by attempts at a quick cleanup.Of all this country's natural killers, by far the greatest -- surpassing floods, hurricanes, tornadoes, lightning, mudslides and blizzards together -- is hot weather.And on that heated note, the blazes currently riveting national attention on Florida are less about the need to "pray for rain" -- Gov. Lawton Chiles' plea -- than about a desperate need to set more fires.
NEWS
By DENNIS O'BRIEN and DENNIS O'BRIEN,SUN REPORTER | July 7, 2006
Rising temperatures and earlier melting of snowpacks have sharply increased the number of Western wildfires - and scientists say to expect more of the same if the trend persists. Researchers at the Scripps Institution of Oceanography and the University of Arizona examined 34 years of forest fire reports in 11 Western states and found the number of fires increased in size and severity since 1987, the same year that spring and summer temperatures began to rise. "It's a very good snapshot of what's been happening in the Western forests over the past three decades," said Anthony Westerling, the lead author and a fire climatologist at the University of California, Merced.
NEWS
September 23, 1996
Lost natural cycle causes forest firesIn a recent article on forest fires, Henson Moore, president of the American Forest and Paper Association, claimed the increase in forest fires was caused by the decrease in logging of the areas. Forest Service Chief Jack Ward Thomas, who can be credited with first-hand experience with forest fires, claimed that the problem was caused by historical efforts to snuff out forest fires, which had disrupted natural fire cycles.When native Americans populated Western forests, the areas resembled parks.
NEWS
By DENNIS O'BRIEN and DENNIS O'BRIEN,SUN REPORTER | July 7, 2006
Rising temperatures and earlier melting of snowpacks have sharply increased the number of Western wildfires - and scientists say to expect more of the same if the trend persists. Researchers at the Scripps Institution of Oceanography and the University of Arizona examined 34 years of forest fire reports in 11 Western states and found the number of fires increased in size and severity since 1987, the same year that spring and summer temperatures began to rise. "It's a very good snapshot of what's been happening in the Western forests over the past three decades," said Anthony Westerling, the lead author and a fire climatologist at the University of California, Merced.
NEWS
By Jackie Powder and Jackie Powder,Sun Staff Writer | September 30, 1994
When Tim Legore and Roger Arrowood volunteered to go to Idaho, they were hoping to fight the forest fires that have burned thousands of acres in the Boise National Forest.But when the two members of the Winfield Volunteer Fire Department arrived in Idaho with 60 firefighters from Maryland, most of the fires already were contained."We were disappointed," said Mr. Legore, 20. "But our first time out fighting a wildfire, we didn't expect to be in the real fire."Instead, Mr. Legore and Mr. Arrowood, 19, did cleanup work, helping to put out smoking "hot spots" and reconstruct trails that had been cleared as part of the firefighting effort.
NEWS
By Robert A. Erlandson and Robert A. Erlandson,Sun Staff Writer | July 18, 1994
Charlie Robertson and Bill Skinner have fought summer forest fires out West together for 20 years, and this year is one of the bad ones.The veteran Maryland forest rangers have recently returned from two weeks of firefighting in 100-plus-degree heat in Arizona's Coronado National Forest, knowing their respite could be brief.Forest fires are raging in several Western states, and "the entire western United States is primed and ready to explode into flames," said Mr. Robertson, senior forest ranger for Baltimore and Carroll counties.
NEWS
By John Rivera and John Rivera,Sun Staff Writer | April 30, 1995
Dry conditions caused by a lack of significant rainfall have caused an increase in the number of brush and forest fires in the state, including a blaze that burned more than 20 acres of woodland Friday near Prettyboy Reservoir.The Maryland Department of Natural Resources has no immediate plans to reinstate the burning ban it imposed statewide for six days this month, said spokesman Bob Graham. But state forestry officials were concerned that windy conditions this weekend might turn some activities, such as lighting a charcoal barbecue, into fire hazards.
NEWS
June 30, 2001
SMOKEY the Bear may have done his job too well, convincing Americans that all forest fires are bad. But fire can be an effective tool in regenerating forest and wildlife habitat. Used properly, fire can help clear out dangerous buildups of stunted trees and brush that can fuel catastrophic wildfires. Prescribed burns -- fires purposely set to clear an area -- are an integral part of the $1.6 billion plan approved by Congress last year to restore the health of public forests. The U.S. Forest Service estimates that at least 39 million acres are at high risk.
NEWS
By Artika Rangan and Artika Rangan,SUN STAFF | August 18, 2004
Don Kronner has been through plenty in nearly 20 years of fighting forest fires - catching bear cubs, riding on buses that have rolled over, extinguishing blazes across the country. But the seasoned Maryland DNR Forest Service firefighter still gets nervous before each mission. "It's hard, hot, dirty work," said Kronner, 46, yesterday morning as he and 19 others from the state's Interagency Wildland Fire Mobilization program mustered in Harford County for a trip to help battle wildfires in Northern California.
NEWS
By David L. Greene and David L. Greene,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | August 23, 2003
WASHINGTON - On a series of well-choreographed outings this month, President Bush sniffed sagebrush in the Santa Monica Mountains and inspected a fire-ravaged forest in Arizona. He hiked rocky ridges and dug unwanted dirt from irrigation ditches. Bush, aides say, is taking his environmental agenda directly to the people, sweating and muddying his presidential boots as he explains how his policies to improve the nation's air, water and public lands can make a difference to their communities.
NEWS
By Andrew C. Revkin and Andrew C. Revkin,NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | January 25, 2002
Fires are burning in thousands of underground coal seams from Pennsylvania to Mongolia, releasing toxic gases, adding millions of tons of heat-trapping carbon dioxide to the atmosphere and baking the earth until vegetation shrivels and the land sinks. Scientists and government agencies are starting to use heat-sensing satellites to map the fires and try new ways to extinguish them. But in many instances - particularly in Asia - they are so widespread and stubborn that miners simply work around the flames.
NEWS
By Joel McCord and Joel McCord,SUN STAFF | November 9, 2001
WESTERNPORT - As firefighters mopped up the remains of a wind-driven brush fire that scorched the steep slopes southeast of this Western Maryland hamlet for two days, another broke out yesterday about 25 miles away, near Corriganville. The second blaze - like the first stoked by dry leaves and grasses that have received little more than a sprinkling of rain in the past month - was burning out of control over 55 acres of steeply wooded terrain, said Dick Devore, the acting emergency management director for Allegany County.
NEWS
By Del Quentin Wilber and Del Quentin Wilber,SUN STAFF | November 7, 2001
Concerned about a monthlong spike in homicides and shootings, Baltimore police officials are redeploying officers and ordering commanders to work night shifts to get a better handle on violence, some of which appears to stem from higher drug prices. "This is like a forest fire," said Deputy Police Commissioner Bert F. Shirey. "It does not go out spontaneously. We either put out the fire, or it runs out of material to burn. We have to get in the middle of this thing, cool it down." Police officials said they were still trying to get a handle on what sparked the increase in homicides - nearly one a day since Oct. 1. From Oct. 7 to Nov. 3, 68 people were shot - a 45 percent increase over last year.
NEWS
June 30, 2001
SMOKEY the Bear may have done his job too well, convincing Americans that all forest fires are bad. But fire can be an effective tool in regenerating forest and wildlife habitat. Used properly, fire can help clear out dangerous buildups of stunted trees and brush that can fuel catastrophic wildfires. Prescribed burns -- fires purposely set to clear an area -- are an integral part of the $1.6 billion plan approved by Congress last year to restore the health of public forests. The U.S. Forest Service estimates that at least 39 million acres are at high risk.
NEWS
By Michael Ollove and Michael Ollove,Sun Staff Writer | July 8, 1994
Other than a shared enemy, the urban and the rural firefighter have little in common. They do not look alike or fight alike. They do not travel the same way to work or use the same tools once they get there.But, as events in Glenwood Springs, Colo., have grimly demonstrated in the past days, firefighting is the nation's most dangerous profession, whether it is practiced in the middle of a city or on the slope of a mountain consumed by flames."There's no difference," said George Burke, a spokesman for the International Association of Fire Fighters (IAFF)
NEWS
By Will Englund and Will Englund,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | November 8, 1998
TERNEY, Russia -- The Moscow economy collapses, and even the tigers far away in the forests by the Sea of Japan must pay the price.Russia had the makings of a success story here, as international efforts to protect the Siberian tiger from poachers and civilization were starting to show results after years of trying.Now new threats are coming at the tigers from all directions. Huge forest fires are burning in the northern ranges of their territory, destroying prey. An unprecedented lack of acorns last winter has made it a bad year for the wild boar that tigers love to eat. Poachers seeking tiger skins and tiger organs for Chinese folk medicines are on the prowl.
NEWS
By Tom Horton and Tom Horton,SUN STAFF | July 10, 1998
DISASTERS are seldom what they first seem.Famines are less about failed crops than about the politics and inequities that impede sharing food in a bounteous world.The environmental impact of large oil spills often is less than the damage done by attempts at a quick cleanup.Of all this country's natural killers, by far the greatest -- surpassing floods, hurricanes, tornadoes, lightning, mudslides and blizzards together -- is hot weather.And on that heated note, the blazes currently riveting national attention on Florida are less about the need to "pray for rain" -- Gov. Lawton Chiles' plea -- than about a desperate need to set more fires.
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