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By Kerry O'Rourke and Kerry O'Rourke,Sun Staff Writer | January 22, 1995
Neil Ridgely, Carroll County's landscape and forest conservation manager, announced Friday he is quitting to manage a tree and shrub farm in Linwood.Mr. Ridgely, 46, of Finksburg was a Democratic candidate for county commissioner last fall. He lost in the primary.He said he is not leaving his county job as a result of the election, but because the opportunity to manage the farm presented itself.He will work at Clear Ridge Native Plant Nursery in the 200 block of Clear Ridge Road. Joe and Sharon Barley own the business, which is on their 100-acre farm.
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NEWS
By Adele Evans and Adele Evans,Special to The Sun | June 3, 2007
Back in 1981, when longtime forester Len Wrabel and his wife, Marikay, moved into their Westminster home, it sat on an empty cornfield. Not uncommon for Carroll County in those days. After all, it has more than a century's history of farming. But today, the Wrabels, who run an environmental consulting service, have 55 species of native trees growing on their 2.5 acres, and they've planted 900 additional trees on a neighbor's property. They are one of many families, developers and forestry officials who are trying to bulk up Carroll County's 70,000 acres of forests for the good of their own water and that of the Chesapeake Bay, polluted by chemical runoff that would otherwise be stopped by trees.
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NEWS
By Greg Tasker and Greg Tasker,Staff Writer | September 30, 1992
Developers, surveyors and engineers who attended a second public workshop last night on Carroll County's proposed forest conservation ordinance came to debate more than technical matters.Some came to question the philosophy behind the ordinance -- aimed at retaining the county's fragmented forests. Others came to tell county officials that the costs associated with replanting trees would be passed on to home buyers."No matter how you look at it, [the ordinance] is going to push up the costs of homes for buyers," said Pat Smith, a real estate agent and a member of the Carroll County Board of Realtors' affordable housing committee.
NEWS
March 26, 2006
Home show is next weekend The eighth annual Carroll County Home Show will be held next Saturday and Sunday at the Carroll County Agriculture Center on Smith Avenue in Westminster. The show will feature the county's largest exhibition of products and services related to home and garden, including home security remodelers, water purification, tree care, bath remodeling, window coverings, roofing, windows, landscaping, pools and spas, sunrooms, home decor, garage doors, gutter protection, mortgage financing, real estate services, invisible fencing, decks and fencing, heating and cooling, horticultural information, flooring, waterproofing, custom closets, insulation, window treatments, custom signs, cookware, custom upholstery, art, air purification, fencing and hardscapes.
NEWS
By Greg Tasker and Greg Tasker,Staff Writer | November 3, 1992
Nearly a year ago, environmentalists, foresters and municipal leaders -- outnumbering a small group of developers -- urged the Carroll County commissioners to write their own forest conservation law.Yesterday, that drafted proposal appeared to be in jeopardy as Commissioner President Donald I. Dell said he wasn't "quite ready to make a determination" on the county's proposal vs. the state law.Counties in Maryland have been given the option of either adhering...
NEWS
By Kerry O'Rourke and Kerry O'Rourke,Staff Writer | August 3, 1993
Carroll Commissioner Donald I. Dell said yesterday he is not particularly worried that Mount Airy's forest conservation ordinance usurps county authority, now that he knows more about the town law.The commissioners plan to discuss the issue with Mayor Gerald R. Johnson Jr. tomorrow at their quarterly meeting with the mayors of Carroll's eight towns.Last week, Mr. Dell said he did not feel comfortable with having county staff members enforce the town ordinance when the commissioners did not know what the ordinance said.
NEWS
By Greg Tasker and Greg Tasker,Staff Writer | August 10, 1993
In the wake of pressure from town officials, the Carroll commissioners voted yesterday against a measure that critics had charged would undermine the penalty section of the county's forest conservation law.On a 2-1 vote, the commissioners killed an amendment that would have changed "shall be assessed a penalty" to "may be assessed a penalty."Commissioner Elmer C. Lippy said the public perceived the proposed change as an attempt to weaken the law, which was adopted last year with the goal of preserving the county's fragmented forests.
NEWS
By Donna R. Engle and Donna R. Engle,SUN STAFF | July 14, 1996
Carroll environmental officials are considering two alternatives to a controversial measure that requires farmers and other landowners who want to harvest timber to sign a "declaration of intent" not to subdivide their land for seven years.However, neither of the proposals would resolve farmers' objections to the cost of having a registered forester draw up a tree harvest plan. A registered forester would be required under the measures being considered by the county's Environmental Affairs Advisory Board.
NEWS
February 17, 1993
The state Department of Natural Resources and the Maryland Association of Counties support a bill proposed by Carroll's General Assembly delegation to charge a fee to cover administrative costs of the Forest Conservation Act.However, the Home Builders Association of Maryland opposed the bill, which was the subject of a hearing by the House Environmental Matters Committee yesterday.Carroll Assistant County Attorney Michelle Ostrander testified that the fee is needed because the state-mandated forest conservation plan requires more work -- and thus more expense -- for county staff.
NEWS
By From Staff Reports | August 16, 1994
The Carroll County commissioners yesterday adopted amendments to the county's forest conservation ordinance that would allow the creation of a forest banking plan and would give credit to developers who plant trees in towns with tree-management plans.Under the forest banking program, developers who can't meet forest conservation regulations may buy easement rights from property owners who create "banks" of forests."Property owners can capitalize on the banks they create by selling rights to developers who can't plant on-site at their developments," said Neil Ridgely, the county's landscaping and forest conservation program manager.
NEWS
By Sarah Koenig and Sarah Koenig,SUN STAFF | December 5, 2002
In what would be the second-largest land preservation deal in state history, Gov. Parris N. Glendening's administration is scrambling to protect almost 25,000 acres of forest land on the Eastern Shore and Southern Maryland before it is sold to developers - and before the governor leaves office next month. The purchase of land and development rights, which administration officials say would greatly benefit Maryland's ecological and economic interests, would cost the state about $22 million.
NEWS
By Sandy Alexander and Sandy Alexander,SUN STAFF | November 22, 2002
The trees that were planted on 9 acres on the edge of David Force Park in Ellicott City this week are only a few feet high; small evergreens and spindly seedlings that look more like twigs stuck upright in the ground. But with nurturing and good weather, the Howard County Department of Recreation and Parks' latest plantings - 6,625 new trees planned on 13 publicly owned sites by Thanksgiving - will thrive. "We concentrate on stream areas more than anything else," said Mark Raab, superintendent of the parks department's natural resources division.
NEWS
By Brenda J. Buote and Brenda J. Buote,SUN STAFF | February 24, 2002
Carroll County homeowners who wish to drill wells, or construct new decks or garages, soon could have more control over where they build. The Carroll commissioners are pushing to relax some of the regulations in the county's Forest Conservation Ordinance, a law that seeks to preserve trees and minimize the impact of development on the landscape. The proposed changes will be discussed during a public hearing Tuesday. "Our local law was more restrictive than the state required," said Commissioner Julia Walsh Gouge.
NEWS
By Heather Dewar and By Heather Dewar,SUN STAFF | December 23, 2001
Deep in Savage River State Forest - a long scramble and slither from the nearest road - stands a forest so old that its giants were already standing tall at the start of the Civil War. Here, on a steep slope overlooking the ravine cut by the Savage River, black bears' trails ramble between towering red oaks, white oaks, maple and beech that ecologists say are at least 200 years old. Velvety red fungi explode from the trunk of a long-dead fire cherry tree,...
NEWS
By Heather Dewar and By Heather Dewar,SUN STAFF | December 23, 2001
Deep in Savage River State Forest - a long scramble and slither from the nearest road - stands a forest so old that its giants were already standing tall at the start of the Civil War. Here, on a steep slope overlooking the ravine cut by the Savage River, black bears' trails ramble among towering red oaks, white oaks, maple and beech that ecologists say are at least 200 years old. The soft gray of the winter forest is hazed by the green of ancient, moss-covered...
NEWS
By David Nitkin and David Nitkin,SUN STAFF | May 1, 2001
Michele and Gregory Reina chopped down two dead trees in their back yard and erected an above-ground pool. For that, they've been made to feel like criminals. Baltimore County dragged the Reinas into Circuit Court, and considered fining them $1.3 million for their actions. The county decided against a monetary penalty, but a judge did place the couple on probation for 18 months. The Reinas, it turns out, had stepped into the thicket of the county's forest conservation law, an 8-year-old statute that is cheered by preservationists even as it confounds homeowners accused of violating its provisions.
NEWS
By Greg Tasker ..TC and Greg Tasker ..TC,Staff Writer | July 25, 1993
Carroll's commissioners are reviewing a final draft of a policy that would allow builders to tap into "tree banks" when they must plant trees to comply with the county's forest conservation ordinance.Under the so-called banking program, developers may buy the rights to trees that have been newly planted in designated areas specifically for that purpose, county officials have said.The program allows developers to avoid having to plant trees to compensate for those they have destroyed if they can prove that trees could not be replanted on the developed property.
NEWS
March 16, 1995
The time has come to strip the bark off the arguments to exempt Carroll County and other non-metropolitan subdivisions from Maryland's forest conservation law. To gather support for this measure, proponents are passing off a lot of nonsense as fact.In testimony last week before the House Environmental Matters Committee, Carroll County Commissioner Donald I. Dell said the forest conservation law is driving industry from the state. Maryland may not enjoy a national reputation as a haven for business, but the state's forest conservation law is hardly the reason.
NEWS
By Sheridan Lyons and Sheridan Lyons,SUN STAFF | February 6, 2001
The Carroll County commissioners contemplated changes yesterday to the county's Forest Conservation Ordinance that officials hope will make it easier for homeowners to understand. Some of the proposals are intended to address specific problems that have arisen with the original plan, which was adopted soon after a state mandate in 1991 to mitigate the impact of development on the natural landscape. "Our charge was to make it fair, equitable and easy to understand," said Dick Owings, chief of the county's Bureau of Development Review.
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