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By SARAH ABRUZZESE and SARAH ABRUZZESE,SUN REPORTER | December 5, 2005
When students of forensic science at the University of Baltimore do laboratory work, they wait until technicians from the city's crime lab leave for the night. The school's lab equipment is so limited that all of it can be stored in one closet. But forensic science education at the downtown university is set to undergo a major transformation, with a laboratory expansion and upgrade from a $2 million grant approved by Congress last month. There is no completion date for the project, which is still being planned.
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SPORTS
By Matt Bracken and The Baltimore Sun | June 11, 2014
Justin Jenifer picked the right time to have one of the best games of his young career. It was March 17, 2013, at Comcast Center, and Jenifer's Milford Mill squad had a date with Potomac, a D.C.-area power featuring four-star prospect and soon-to-be Maryland shooting guard commitment Dion Wiley . Jenifer, a 5-foot-10, 160-pound point guard, was up for the challenge. The wiry sophomore scored 17 points and added seven rebounds and seven assists in the Millers' 84-55 rout of the Wolverines.
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NEWS
February 20, 2009
Baltimore prosecutors often complain that city jurors are unduly influenced by TV crime dramas. They call it the "CSI Effect," a reference to the popular television show where fingerprints, bullet fragments, gunshot residue, bite marks and other forensic evidence almost always match a suspect to a crime. That's not the way it is in real life, though plenty of criminal cases have been decided on just that kind of evidence. Now, prosecutors in Maryland and across the nation will have to contend with a judgment of forensic science more troubling and problematic for the criminal justice system than any prime-time soap.
SPORTS
By Katherine Dunn, The Baltimore Sun | October 10, 2012
An All-State lineman on the offensive side of the ball last season, Wilde Lake's Moise Larose may be even more impressive this fall on the defensive side. The 6-foot-5, 285-pound senior has committed to Rutgers as an offensive tackle, but Wildecats coach Mike Harrison is getting plenty of calls from college coaches who would rather see Larose on their defensive lines next fall. Larose, who played his first three seasons at Meade before transferring to Wilde Lake when his family moved over the summer, leads the Wildecats (3-3)
NEWS
By Tyrone Richardson and Tyrone Richardson,SUN STAFF | April 24, 2005
Three years ago, science teacher Terri Bradford had to rely on textbooks and the traditional gear of lab biology and chemistry to grab the interest of her River Hill High School students. Today, Bradford is known for her mock crime scene layouts - complete with fake corpses and bloody footprints in the classroom - as she teaches the applied science of forensics. Bradford, who is part of a growing group of forensic science teachers in high schools across the country, uses real-life stories, equipment and guest speakers from the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives, as well as professional pathologists, to impart crime-solving lessons.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | December 3, 2002
NEWBURGH, N.Y. - In classrooms throughout the Newburgh Free Academy here, teen-agers stifle yawns at the 7:50 a.m. start of the school day. But Mikki Bieber's forensic science students bound up to the roof two steps at a time, eager to take part in one of the latest educational fads. The students, all fans of CSI, television's top-rated show, press their feet into boxes of powdered charcoal, stamp them on construction paper and preserve the prints with a spritz of hair spray. They have discussed in class the many things that can be learned at a crime scene through footprint analysis: How many people were present.
NEWS
By Dail Willis and Dail Willis,SUN STAFF | March 17, 1999
When other little girls were playing with Barbies, Dana Kollmann was shaking a colander in her back yard in Fallston, sifting for treasures in the dirt. Two decades later, she's still sifting -- and her treasures help convict robbers and murderers.Kollmann, 30, is a crime lab technician for the Baltimore County Police Department and a self-described "closet ghoul" who works all night tracking the messy trail of violence. Blood, lint, semen, dust, hair, shoe prints -- anything and everything can be evidence of human misbehavior.
NEWS
By Lisa Respers and Lisa Respers,SUN STAFF | February 24, 1999
They look like dollhouses of death.At the state medical examiner's office in downtown Baltimore, 18 glass cases hold tiny replicas of crime scenes from the 1930s and 1940s -- clues from the past that are helping investigators of the present learn how to be more effective crime fighters."
NEWS
October 26, 2007
Baltimore County Circuit Judge Susan M. Souder ruled this week that fingerprint evidence, a mainstay of police forensics for more than a century, is not reliable enough to be used as evidence in the murder trial of Bryan Keith Rose, who could be sentenced to death if convicted. Prosecutors, defense attorneys, legal experts and law enforcement officials are assessing the implications of the ruling on a method that fingerprint examiners say is 100 percent reliable and critics assail as "trust me" forensic science.
NEWS
By Liz F. Kay and Liz F. Kay,liz.kay@baltsun.com | January 16, 2009
The Maryland State Police have appointed a new forensics lab director. Teresa M. Long, acting director of forensic services who put the department's DNA analysis program into place, takes the spot vacated by Jay Tobin, who retired in July. The department's 82 employees, including forensic scientists, crime scene technicians, police photographers, inventory control officers and support staff, analyze evidence from state police cases as well as other police agencies statewide, police said.
NEWS
By Lara J. Nettelfield and Sarah Wagner | June 6, 2011
Despite his efforts to stave off his long-overdue date with justice, indicted war criminal Ratko Mladic appeared before a panel of judges at the International Criminal Tribunal for the former Yugoslavia in The Hague on Friday. Soon he will stand trial for war crimes, crimes against humanity, and genocide, atrocities he planned and executed throughout the 1992-1995 war, from the siege of Sarajevo to the concentration camps of Prijedor and the genocide at Srebrenica. Mr. Mladic's last request before his transfer was to visit the grave of his daughter, Ana, who committed suicide in 1994 with her father's pistol.
NEWS
February 20, 2009
Baltimore prosecutors often complain that city jurors are unduly influenced by TV crime dramas. They call it the "CSI Effect," a reference to the popular television show where fingerprints, bullet fragments, gunshot residue, bite marks and other forensic evidence almost always match a suspect to a crime. That's not the way it is in real life, though plenty of criminal cases have been decided on just that kind of evidence. Now, prosecutors in Maryland and across the nation will have to contend with a judgment of forensic science more troubling and problematic for the criminal justice system than any prime-time soap.
NEWS
February 8, 2009
When British researchers asked five crime lab examiners to evaluate a series of fingerprints, they were told one pair had been mistakenly matched to a terrorism suspect. The experts reached conflicting results. Only one judged the prints identical. The fingerprint examiners later learned that the samples were prints they each had previously reviewed and found to be the same. The study by Itiel E. Dror and two colleagues underscores what some defense attorneys in Maryland and elsewhere have argued - forensic experts can be influenced, and not in justice's favor.
NEWS
By Liz F. Kay and Liz F. Kay,liz.kay@baltsun.com | January 16, 2009
The Maryland State Police have appointed a new forensics lab director. Teresa M. Long, acting director of forensic services who put the department's DNA analysis program into place, takes the spot vacated by Jay Tobin, who retired in July. The department's 82 employees, including forensic scientists, crime scene technicians, police photographers, inventory control officers and support staff, analyze evidence from state police cases as well as other police agencies statewide, police said.
NEWS
By Pat O'Malley and Pat O'Malley,Sun Reporter | December 19, 2007
South River's Jaclyn Nucci is the returning All-County girls basketball Player of the Year after averaging 20.3 points, 9.6 rebounds, three assists and 2.7 steals last year as a junior. The senior, 5 feet 9, was also an All-County performer in soccer this past fall and is concentrating now on leading the Seahawks to the Class 4A state semifinals. Undecided on a college, Nucci, who has a 3.8 grade-point average and scored 1,520 on her SAT, hopes to play basketball at the next level, preferably at a small school.
NEWS
By Stephen Kiehl and Stephen Kiehl,Sun reporter | November 5, 2007
Call it the CSI list: fingerprints, gunshot residue, ballistics, toxicology, bite patterns - the full rundown of forensic methods used by prosecutors to link defendants to crime scenes. Public perception and generations of prosecutors suggest that all of those forensic methods produce rock-solid scientific evidence against criminal defendants. And one by one, Patrick Kent, chief of the forensics division at the state public defender's office, is trying to destroy those certainties. Kent has enjoyed success by attacking the validity of gunshot residue and - just last month in a Baltimore County murder case - fingerprints.
NEWS
By Stephen Kiehl and Stephen Kiehl,Sun reporter | November 5, 2007
Call it the CSI list: fingerprints, gunshot residue, ballistics, toxicology, bite patterns - the full rundown of forensic methods used by prosecutors to link defendants to crime scenes. Public perception and generations of prosecutors suggest that all of those forensic methods produce rock-solid scientific evidence against criminal defendants. And one by one, Patrick Kent, chief of the forensics division at the state public defender's office, is trying to destroy those certainties. Kent has enjoyed success by attacking the validity of gunshot residue and - just last month in a Baltimore County murder case - fingerprints.
NEWS
By Michael James and Michael James,SUN STAFF | February 3, 1997
In old-fashioned murder mysteries, the killer's sweaty palms always give him away. The intuitive detective -- attentive, adept at reading human nature -- quickly recognizes them as a sure sign of guilt.Now, investigators say they require not intuition but DNA. They need only a drop of the sweat."When a person leaves any DNA at his crime scene, whether it's a drop of blood, saliva or perspiration, he's left us his calling card," says Paul Ferrara, a noted DNA researcher and head of Virginia's state crime laboratory, the Division of Forensic Science.
NEWS
October 26, 2007
Baltimore County Circuit Judge Susan M. Souder ruled this week that fingerprint evidence, a mainstay of police forensics for more than a century, is not reliable enough to be used as evidence in the murder trial of Bryan Keith Rose, who could be sentenced to death if convicted. Prosecutors, defense attorneys, legal experts and law enforcement officials are assessing the implications of the ruling on a method that fingerprint examiners say is 100 percent reliable and critics assail as "trust me" forensic science.
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