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By Jamie Smith Hopkins, The Baltimore Sun | January 6, 2013
Dr. Ellen G. McDaniel, whose distinguished career in psychiatry spanned more than 40 years and influenced patients, medical students and even juries, died of lung cancer Thursday at her home in Highland. She was 71. The former Ellen Garb was raised in Cleveland and went off to college with thoughts of becoming a nurse. But her father encouraged her to train as a doctor, and she did — graduating from the University of Michigan Medical School as one of only seven women in the class of 1966, said her husband, John P. McDaniel.
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By Jamie Smith Hopkins, The Baltimore Sun | January 6, 2013
Dr. Ellen G. McDaniel, whose distinguished career in psychiatry spanned more than 40 years and influenced patients, medical students and even juries, died of lung cancer Thursday at her home in Highland. She was 71. The former Ellen Garb was raised in Cleveland and went off to college with thoughts of becoming a nurse. But her father encouraged her to train as a doctor, and she did — graduating from the University of Michigan Medical School as one of only seven women in the class of 1966, said her husband, John P. McDaniel.
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NEWS
By Michael Ollove and Michael Ollove,Staff Writer | June 29, 1992
Had Jonas Rappeport been called to the witness stand, his legions of admirers are fond of saying, John Hinckley Jr. would be sitting in a prison cell today rather than a hospital ward.The thinking goes that the jurors would have found this slight, owlish-looking psychiatrist irresistible. They would have perceived him as being so commonsensical, so agreeable, so reasonable, that they could do nothing but side with him, rule that Mr. Hinckley was sane when he shot Ronald Reagan and send the would-be presidential assassin to a long, long stay in a penitentiary.
NEWS
By Michael Ollove and Michael Ollove,Staff Writer | June 29, 1992
Had Jonas Rappeport been called to the witness stand, his legions of admirers are fond of saying, John Hinckley Jr. would be sitting in a prison cell today rather than a hospital ward.The thinking goes that the jurors would have found this slight, owlish-looking psychiatrist irresistible. They would have perceived him as being so commonsensical, so agreeable, so reasonable, that they could do nothing but side with him, rule that Mr. Hinckley was sane when he shot Ronald Reagan and send the would-be presidential assassin to a long, long stay in a penitentiary.
NEWS
By Jennifer McMenamin and Jennifer McMenamin,SUN STAFF | June 23, 2004
A supervising doctor from the state's forensic psychiatric hospital testified yesterday that a Baltimore man not only is competent to stand trial in the killing of his girlfriend's 8-year-old daughter but also is so aware of the legal proceedings that he "dramatizes his actions" in the courtroom to influence the judge who will decide whether the case goes forward. Dr. Saadia Alizai, director of admissions at the Clifton T. Perkins Hospital Center and supervisor of the forensic psychiatry fellowship program, told a Baltimore County judge that Jamaal Abeokuto's actions in court - clutching his head, kneading his forehead and gazing down with what the defense team's psychologist described in testimony Monday as "vacant" eyes - appear to be an act. She said the mannerisms are an extension of the embellishments and "malingering."
NEWS
By KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | December 21, 2003
PHILADELPHIA - What goes on in the minds of medical professionals who become serial killers? Forensic experts are trying to answer that question following the arrest of Charles Cullen, the New Jersey nurse who says he killed as many as 40 patients. He has been charged with murder in the death of one patient, and investigators are looking into deaths at 10 Pennsylvania and New Jersey hospitals where Cullen worked. Since 1974, nearly four dozen nurses, therapists and doctors have been prosecuted for serial killings in the United States and other countries.
NEWS
By MARK MAGNIER and MARK MAGNIER,LOS ANGELES TIMES | March 17, 2006
BEIJING -- A psychiatric examination performed on a former patient held for 13 years in a police-run Chinese mental hospital has concluded that there was no cause for his detention, human rights groups said yesterday in condemning Beijing's political abuse of psychiatry. Dutch psychiatrists who tested Wang Wanxing, 56, over a two-day period early this year found nothing wrong with him after he was released from a type of mental institution known as ankang, or "peace and health," according to the Netherlands-based Global Initiative on Psychiatry, a civic group that sponsored the exam.
NEWS
By David Grossman | October 25, 1999
AS CONGRESS puts the finishing touches on the juvenile justice bill, it is time to ask ourselves: Who is teaching our kids to kill?In the United States, per capita aggravated assaults are up almost sixfold since 1957.I sat beside U.S. Surgeon General David Satcher on "Meet the Press" after the Columbine High School shootings in Littleton, Colo. He was asked if he could do a report on the link between media violence and violence in our kids."Sure, I can do another surgeon general's report," he said, "but why don't we start by reading the 1972 surgeon general's report?"
NEWS
By Scott Calvert, The Baltimore Sun | May 31, 2012
In a career spanning three decades, forensic psychiatrist Steven Hoge has evaluated just a handful of people implicated in acts of cannibalism. It's exceedingly rare behavior, he says, and clear answers are often elusive when it does occur. "I understand people are looking for an explanation, but there are some things that don't have any explanations," said Hoge, who directs the Columbia-Cornell Forensic Psychiatry Fellowship Program in New York. Hoge said he could not comment on the case of 21-year-old Alexander Kinyua, charged with first-degree murder in the killing of a man who was staying in Kinyua's family's Joppa home.
NEWS
By Staff Report | December 9, 1992
Dr. Saleem A. Shah, an expert on the law and mental health who died Nov. 25, was described yesterday as having helped establish forensic psychiatry as a specialty.Though himself a psychologist, the 60-year-old Catonsville resident had helped to establish the specialty and was instrumental in organizing the American Academy of Psychiatry and the Law through a fellowship program he administered at the National Institute of Mental Health. At the time of his death, he was a senior scientist there.
FEATURES
By Bruce McCabe and Bruce McCabe,The Boston Globe | May 15, 1994
There are some interesting people you should get to know in the pages of the magazines this week.One is Iris Sawyer, the woman scorned in Roger D. Friedman's intriguing piece in the current New York magazine. Ms. Sawyer's classic New York (both the city and the magazine) story has everything. It's not only about that cliche, the Death of the '80s, it's also a cautionary tale about dabbling with wealthy, free-swinging hustlers. It's also about the Nouveau Poor, people like Ms. Sawyer, a woman who was worth $3.5 million five years ago and who is now virtually homeless.
NEWS
By Frank Langfitt and Frank Langfitt,Staff Writer | December 13, 1992
Not much surprises Dr. Raymond Patterson anymore.Dr. Patterson, a nationally known forensic psychiatrist, has spent the last 11 years treating mentally ill criminals in Washington, D.C.His patients have committed crimes that stretch the human imagination.One had been arrested at the Library of Congress after angrily demanding a copyright for music he said he heard playing in outer space."He wanted the millions of dollars in royalties," Dr. Patterson explained. "He was very sick."Another had rushed the White House with a machete, convinced that the KGB had replaced President Reagan with an impostor.
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