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By RICHARD C. PADDOCK AND DINDA JOUHANA and RICHARD C. PADDOCK AND DINDA JOUHANA,LOS ANGELES TIMES | October 2, 2005
JIMBARAN, Indonesia - Three bombs exploded, two almost simultaneously, last evening at crowded restaurants on the Indonesian resort island of Bali, killing at least 25 people and wounding more than 100 others, authorities said. The blasts, which apparently targeted foreign tourists, ripped through two open-air cafes at popular Jimbaran Beach and, moments later, struck a restaurant about 18 miles north in the city of Kuta. Authorities branded the bombings terrorist attacks. Suspicion quickly fell on Jemaah Islamiyah, an extremist Muslim group linked to al-Qaida that was responsible for the double suicide bombing of two nightclubs in Kuta three years ago this month.
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SPORTS
By PETER SCHMUCK | March 2, 2008
Despite the supposedly soft national economy, the tourist business is booming in South Florida, thanks to the plummeting dollar and the high percentage of foreign visitors to the Miami-Dade area. Miami-Dade relies more on foreign tourists than any other major U.S. destination, according to the South Florida Sun-Sentinel, with more than half of overnight visitors coming from abroad. There would be a joke in there somewhere if I wasn't married.
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SPORTS
By PETER SCHMUCK | March 2, 2008
Despite the supposedly soft national economy, the tourist business is booming in South Florida, thanks to the plummeting dollar and the high percentage of foreign visitors to the Miami-Dade area. Miami-Dade relies more on foreign tourists than any other major U.S. destination, according to the South Florida Sun-Sentinel, with more than half of overnight visitors coming from abroad. There would be a joke in there somewhere if I wasn't married.
NEWS
By Paul Vitello and Paul Vitello,New York Times News Service | May 27, 2007
NEW YORK -- Every summer, people all over the world become acquainted again with a deep truth spoken by the philosopher-tourist Steve Martin. He was speaking for tourists everywhere, not just to France, when he said, "Boy, those French - they have a different word for everything!" That people from different countries observe different customs - not only of speaking, but of eating, sleeping, gesturing, counting change, observing boundaries of personal space, tipping cab drivers, standing in lines, avoiding certain topics of conversation at dinnertime as unbearably disgusting - is a truism one probably can never be reminded of too often.
NEWS
September 17, 1993
After a German tourist was murdered in Miami and before a British tourist was murdered near Tallahassee, the Miami Herald editorialized, "Fighting crime against visitors is only a partial answer to the problem . . . . We must also stop the daily savagery against each other." A Herald columnist wrote, "We should be less concerned about how others view us and more concerned about how we view ourselves." Sure, but precisely because the victims were visitors, no recent crime story has so highlighted the direct link between crime and a community's overall well being.
NEWS
By DAN BERGER | March 29, 1994
The West Coast turns out to be as fatal to foreign tourists as the East and Gulf Coasts.Tornadoes were sent to mop up any part of the Southeast that missed the ice storms last month.The trouble with strong-man government, as in Mexico, is that the lone assassin is the strongest man.Don't look now, but two nuclear powers, Russia and Ukraine, are heading to war over Crimea, over which wars have been fought before . . .Bill faces only two obstacles to his foreign policy: the Republicans and the Democrats.
NEWS
By Amberin Zaman and Amberin Zaman,LOS ANGELES TIMES | July 17, 2005
ANKARA, Turkey - A powerful bomb blast destroyed a minibus in a Turkish seaside resort yesterday, killing five people, among them an Irish and a British tourist, and wounding 13 others, officials said. Police were investigating whether a suicide bomber or a parcel bomb caused the blast in the center of the Aegean town of Kusadasi, a popular destination for foreign tourists. The attack came just a week after a bomb attack, for which Kurdish separatists have claimed responsibility, wounded 20 people in the nearby resort of Cesme.
BUSINESS
December 4, 1991
Duty Free International Inc.This Connecticut-based operator of duty-free shops reported record third-quarter earnings and said its net income rose 76 percent from the third quarter of last year.Duty Free International has a bonded warehouse in Glen Burnie that allows the company to serve other duty-free retailers. That warehouse is part of the company's Glen Burnie-based diplomatic and wholesale division. Company spokeswoman Dyan C. Cutro said the company bought that division in 1983.Ms. Cutro said the company has done better than other retailers in fighting the recession because its duty-free shops can offer exceptional values to foreign tourists.
NEWS
May 12, 1993
After the Baltimore Museum of Art and Walters Art Gallery introduced admission fees a few years back, could Buckingham Palace be far behind?It took the convergence of fire at Windsor Castle, the soaring unpopularity of the royal family and the embarrassment of the exchequer faced with the Windsor repair bill to bring Queen Elizabeth II into trade like some common aristocrat.She will open her London home, Buckingham Palace, which belongs to the Crown and not to her personally, to tourists in July and August.
FEATURES
By New York Times News Service | May 15, 1994
Q: I intend to visit South Korea, particularly Seoul. Am I likely to find bed and breakfast accommodations there?A: The equivalent of bed and breakfast in South Korea is theminbak, a system under which families make one or more rooms in their homes available to paying guests.Traditionally minbak, found only in the countryside, have been used only by Koreans, and typically breakfast is not included.But under a program set up by the Korea National Tourism Corporation, hundreds of families who live in cities and who have a working knowledge of English have been recruited to offer a room and breakfast to foreign tourists.
NEWS
By RICHARD C. PADDOCK AND DINDA JOUHANA and RICHARD C. PADDOCK AND DINDA JOUHANA,LOS ANGELES TIMES | October 2, 2005
JIMBARAN, Indonesia - Three bombs exploded, two almost simultaneously, last evening at crowded restaurants on the Indonesian resort island of Bali, killing at least 25 people and wounding more than 100 others, authorities said. The blasts, which apparently targeted foreign tourists, ripped through two open-air cafes at popular Jimbaran Beach and, moments later, struck a restaurant about 18 miles north in the city of Kuta. Authorities branded the bombings terrorist attacks. Suspicion quickly fell on Jemaah Islamiyah, an extremist Muslim group linked to al-Qaida that was responsible for the double suicide bombing of two nightclubs in Kuta three years ago this month.
NEWS
By Amberin Zaman and Amberin Zaman,LOS ANGELES TIMES | July 17, 2005
ANKARA, Turkey - A powerful bomb blast destroyed a minibus in a Turkish seaside resort yesterday, killing five people, among them an Irish and a British tourist, and wounding 13 others, officials said. Police were investigating whether a suicide bomber or a parcel bomb caused the blast in the center of the Aegean town of Kusadasi, a popular destination for foreign tourists. The attack came just a week after a bomb attack, for which Kurdish separatists have claimed responsibility, wounded 20 people in the nearby resort of Cesme.
NEWS
By Megan K. Stack and Megan K. Stack,LOS ANGELES TIMES | April 8, 2005
CAIRO, Egypt - An explosion in a bustling market in the tourist-packed heart of Cairo's old city killed two people yesterday and wounded at least 18. Some witnesses reported that a motorcyclist set off the blast The old bazaar near al-Azhar mosque was sealed off last night as investigators combed the narrow alleyways for clues. Witnesses said the blast shattered shop windows, leaving the dead and wounded sprawled in the streets. The late afternoon blast was the first bombing that appeared to target tourists in Cairo since September 1997.
NEWS
By Frank Langfitt and Frank Langfitt,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | July 2, 2000
WALNUT GROVE, China - The first thing that strikes visitors to Tiger Leaping Gorge is its sheer size. Twice as deep as the Grand Canyon, the chasm plunges more than two vertical miles from the serrated peaks of Jade Dragon Snow Mountain into the churning rapids of the Yangtze River. More spectacular and more remote than the famous Three Gorges, the area opened to foreign tourists - mostly backpackers - in 1993. Today, travelers can still hike in relative solitude, chatting with villagers and stopping to rinse their heads in the waterfalls that pour down the limestone and granite walls.
NEWS
By Mark Matthews and Mark Matthews,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | May 22, 2000
JERUSALEM - Israeli Prime Minister Ehud Barak summoned peace envoys home and barred Israelis and foreign tourists from Palestinian-run parts of the West Bank and Gaza in response to more than a week of riots that claimed another victim early yesterday: a badly burned 2-year-old Israeli girl. The mounting pressure on the Palestinian leadership to quell the disturbances appeared to work. As the day progressed, Palestinian security forces restored order to most parts of the West Bank and Gaza, and only minor skirmishes were reported between Palestinian youths and Israeli soldiers and settlers.
NEWS
By Ann LoLordo and Ann LoLordo,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | November 19, 1997
CAIRO, Egypt -- Egypt's main Islamic militant group claimed yesterday that its men carried out the attack that left 68 people dead at an ancient temple in Luxor, but said they intended only to take hostages and use them to win the release of their spiritual leader, a blind sheik imprisoned in the United States for plotting to blow up New York landmarks.The al-Gama'a al-Islamiya (Islamic Group) blamed government police for the carnage, according to a statement by the group faxed to news services.
FEATURES
By William Arnold and William Arnold,New York Daily News Pub Date: 3/30/97 SEATTLE POST-INTELLIGENCER | March 30, 1997
As this year's best picture Oscar winner, "The English Patient" is fulfilling a long-standing tradition: It has inspired a boom of tourism for its romantic setting.Ever since the 1935 winner, "Mutiny on the Bounty," turned Tahiti into a major tourist destination in the '30s, best-picture winners -- which tend to be big historical epics set in exotic places -- have had a remarkable way of sending legions of movie-influenced travelers on pilgrimages.The 1958 winner, "Bridge on the River Kwai," for instance, overnight turned the River Kwai-Kanchanaburi prison-camp site into Thailand's third largest tourist draw, and 40 years later it still is, with a sound and light show simulating the effects for visitors.
NEWS
By Mark Matthews and Mark Matthews,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | May 22, 2000
JERUSALEM - Israeli Prime Minister Ehud Barak summoned peace envoys home and barred Israelis and foreign tourists from Palestinian-run parts of the West Bank and Gaza in response to more than a week of riots that claimed another victim early yesterday: a badly burned 2-year-old Israeli girl. The mounting pressure on the Palestinian leadership to quell the disturbances appeared to work. As the day progressed, Palestinian security forces restored order to most parts of the West Bank and Gaza, and only minor skirmishes were reported between Palestinian youths and Israeli soldiers and settlers.
FEATURES
By William Arnold and William Arnold,New York Daily News Pub Date: 3/30/97 SEATTLE POST-INTELLIGENCER | March 30, 1997
As this year's best picture Oscar winner, "The English Patient" is fulfilling a long-standing tradition: It has inspired a boom of tourism for its romantic setting.Ever since the 1935 winner, "Mutiny on the Bounty," turned Tahiti into a major tourist destination in the '30s, best-picture winners -- which tend to be big historical epics set in exotic places -- have had a remarkable way of sending legions of movie-influenced travelers on pilgrimages.The 1958 winner, "Bridge on the River Kwai," for instance, overnight turned the River Kwai-Kanchanaburi prison-camp site into Thailand's third largest tourist draw, and 40 years later it still is, with a sound and light show simulating the effects for visitors.
NEWS
By Michaela Jarvis and Michaela Jarvis,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | November 21, 1996
HAVANA -- The black canvas shoes in the state ration store are stacked by the hundreds next to the boxy canvas bras. The shoes are a little sticky from the glue used to make them and are awkwardly shaped, like ovals instead of feet. Juan David Tapia ++ and Yacir Barrero think they're completely uncool.The two kids, whose parents each make salaries of less than $7 a month, don't want what the government store offers."Do you have Nikes?" Juan asks a foreigner walking past. "Can you give them to us?"
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