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NEWS
December 5, 2013
There's a reason foreign students do so much better on standardized test than Americans ( "America the mediocre," Dec. 3). I was listening to a story on the BBC the other day that said one reason South Korea is fifth overall in reading, math and science is that Korean students on average go to school 16 hours a day. Many log 18 hours. They can do this because there is a booming business in private, after-hours schools. Randall Miller, Ocean View, Del. - To respond to this letter, send an email to talkback@baltimoresun.com . Please include your name and contact information.
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NEWS
By Liz Bowie, The Baltimore Sun | August 24, 2014
With just $40 in his pocket and the killing of two friends fresh in his mind, 13-year-old Leonardo Enrique Navas set off from El Salvador in July and traveled alone for 15 days on buses and taxis until he crossed the border into Texas. Every few days, he said, he called his mother in Maryland. That was the first part of his American journey. When school opens Tuesday, he will have his first day in a U.S. seventh-grade classroom, at Bates Middle School in Annapolis, after being reunited with a mother he had not seen for seven years.
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NEWS
By Joe Burris, The Baltimore Sun | February 7, 2013
Some foreign-born students at Howard Community College enter professor Mary Beth Furst's business class, sit attentively through instruction and say next to nothing. Furst said that when they are called upon, "You would think they were going to die, because they're really uncomfortable speaking up. " She recently discovered one of the reasons behind the silence: Some students hail from countries where it is disrespectful to ask an instructor a question. Furst and other HCC faculty and staff are learning about the college's ever-diversifying student population — and coming up with better ways to break down cultural and communications gaps — through a professional development program called INSPIRES Global Perspectives.
NEWS
By Freeman A. Hrabowski III | February 2, 2014
UMBC is home to students from more than 100 countries and to thousands of students who are first- and second-generation Americans. I continually think about the experiences and perspectives these students bring to our campus and to Maryland. One particular exchange stands out in my mind. "If I don't do well in my classes," a Jamaican student told me, "my younger brothers and sisters may not eat. I know I am not just here for myself but for my family. " There is hardship and worry in that statement, but at its center, there is hope.
NEWS
By Suzanne Loudermilk and Suzanne Loudermilk,Sun Staff Writer | July 17, 1994
Stacy Fair is running out of time.The Abingdon woman has only seven more days to find homes for 16 teen-age foreign students who are scheduled to arrive in Harford County next Sunday for a monthlong visit.Her quest to house the group of 25 students has not been easy."Maybe it's because it's summer," says Mrs. Fair, the local coordinator of International Education Forum, a nonprofit student-exchange organization.She has advertised, she has hung "urgent" posters in local neighborhoods, and today and tomorrow, she'll be staked out at a table at Harford Mall looking for host families for students from Spain and Russia.
NEWS
By Patricia Meisol | December 23, 1991
The University of Maryland's University College, seeing its worldwide education programs threatened by a dramatic reduction of U.S. troops abroad, has begun marketing itself to foreign students on their own turf.The continuing education arm of the state's public university system has quietly sent out notices to high schools here and abroad announcing the opening in September of a four-year college in a small town in Germany. A campus in Thailand could be next.Because of a near stranglehold on military education contracts abroad, University College is the largest purveyor of American higher education outside the United States.
NEWS
By Lisa Pollak and Lisa Pollak,SUN STAFF | July 4, 1996
Gregg Jones didn't think it would come to this: There he was -- the man in charge of finding summer homes for 20 Japanese exchange students -- standing in front of a Giant supermarket last week, searching for strangers with empty beds and open minds."
NEWS
By Michael Hill and Michael Hill,SUN STAFF | October 11, 2000
When Chen Yafen of Shanghai, China, looked around the world for a master of business administration course, she ended up at the University of Baltimore. Known for generations in its hometown as a commuter school for local students, UB has delved into the growing market for international students seeking degrees from U.S. institutions. UB isn't alone. Figures show a steady growth in foreign students at the state's colleges and universities, from 4,849 in 1989 to 8,241 last year. For the third consecutive year, UB has recruited about 20 Chinese students for its intensive one-year MBA program.
NEWS
By Walter F. Roche Jr. and Walter F. Roche Jr.,SUN STAFF | September 7, 2002
When the door opens at the barracks-like building near Catonsville, the first thing that's evident is the smell - the thick, sickening smell of sewage. The stench - along with a carpet stained with effluent - is what greeted about two dozen foreign students who made their home at 6601 Johnnycake Road for nearly three months this summer while they worked selling vegetables from the backs of trucks for Delmarva Farms of Catonsville. The students from England and Romania are gone now. Many have returned home, and the remaining half-dozen were scooped up late Thursday by a convoy of neighbors who offered refuge until the youths return to their homelands.
NEWS
By Robert Becker and Robert Becker,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | March 23, 2003
CHICAGO -- The computer system intended to track international students as part of the nation's stepped-up security routinely loses sensitive information about foreign students and faculty, according to university officials throughout the country. Gaffes in the $36 million Student and Exchange Visitor Information System -- or SEVIS -- have also left schools unable to print documents that international students and visiting scholars need to obtain visas, delaying their entry into the country.
NEWS
December 5, 2013
There's a reason foreign students do so much better on standardized test than Americans ( "America the mediocre," Dec. 3). I was listening to a story on the BBC the other day that said one reason South Korea is fifth overall in reading, math and science is that Korean students on average go to school 16 hours a day. Many log 18 hours. They can do this because there is a booming business in private, after-hours schools. Randall Miller, Ocean View, Del. - To respond to this letter, send an email to talkback@baltimoresun.com . Please include your name and contact information.
NEWS
May 6, 2013
Isn't focusing on foreign students entering the U.S. a form of discrimination ("America is exceptional, and that includes the way we treat immigrants," April 29)? After all, we don't enforce our immigration laws, which has resulted in America being flooded with 11 million to 12 million immigrants who are here illegally. Who is to say how many of those have terrorist inclinations are not just students? We should either enforce all immigration laws or not enforce any, keeping in mind as President Ronald Reagan said: "A nation that cannot control its borders can't control its destiny.
NEWS
By Joe Burris, The Baltimore Sun | February 7, 2013
Some foreign-born students at Howard Community College enter professor Mary Beth Furst's business class, sit attentively through instruction and say next to nothing. Furst said that when they are called upon, "You would think they were going to die, because they're really uncomfortable speaking up. " She recently discovered one of the reasons behind the silence: Some students hail from countries where it is disrespectful to ask an instructor a question. Furst and other HCC faculty and staff are learning about the college's ever-diversifying student population — and coming up with better ways to break down cultural and communications gaps — through a professional development program called INSPIRES Global Perspectives.
NEWS
July 25, 2012
If all the conditions for children of illegal immigrants to receive in-state college tuition rates are met - including graduating from a Maryland high school, having parents who pay their taxes and three years of residency in the state - then there is no reason such students should pay more for their college education. It's only when these conditions are not met that we end up penalizing out-of-state and foreign students, and overburden the taxpayers who support the state's two- and four-year colleges.
NEWS
March 7, 2012
I have no idea what opportunities exist for Hakha Chin speakers in Baltimore, but it's good refugees understand job competition ("Short course in American life," March 3). Now let's find a way to train young Americans in the same game of musical chairs that the Baltimore Orientation Center provides. A six-year Gallup "World Poll" study on what most people all over the world desire discovered "what the whole world wants is a good job. " It's time Americans woke up to this worldwide job struggle.
TRAVEL
By Edward Gunts, The Baltimore Sun | August 26, 2011
More than 2,000 Ocean City evacuees have arrived in the Baltimore area for temporary housing during Hurricane Irene, as part of the state's preparations for the storm. Six hundred foreign exchange students traveled in buses from Ocean City on Thursday night and stayed on cots in Burdick Hall, a gymnasium on the Towson University campus, said John Hatten, director of emergency operations for Maryland's Department of Human Resources. In Owings Mills, 395 more students are being housed at the Jewish Community Center of Greater Baltimore, while 1,000 to 1,100 are staying at the 5th Regiment Armory near Bolton Hill, according to Hatten and human resources department spokesman Ian Patrick Hines.
NEWS
By Walter F. Roche Jr. and Walter F. Roche Jr.,SUN STAFF | August 27, 2002
A preliminary State Department investigation of charges by some foreign students that they were being exploited by the McDonald's restaurant chain has concluded that the students' complaints were "well founded." In a letter to U.S. Sen. Barbara A. Mikulski, a State Department official wrote that the agency was aware of "the unfortunate situation" faced by students who came here to work for the fast-food chain under a summer work/travel program. "We have also determined that the complaints by the five students ... are well founded," wrote Paul V. Kelly, assistant secretary of legislative affairs, in the letter sent late last week to the Maryland Democrat.
NEWS
By Laura Cadiz and Laura Cadiz,SUN STAFF | October 21, 2001
On the night of Sept. 11, Maria Florencia Rodriguez, 16, frantically e-mailed her parents in Argentina from Frederick and wrote, "Please talk to me and tell me something." A high school exchange student thousands of miles from home, Rodriguez was frightened - and so were her parents. She told her mom and dad that she heard people talking about America going to war, and she wanted to go home but was afraid to fly. Her parents were concerned about her safety and thought about asking her to return to Caleta Olivia, Argentina.
NEWS
May 27, 2011
Dan Rodricks ' recent column ("Seeing Dream Act Kids as 'our own,'" May 26) completely misses the point by comparing the children of people here illegally with international students. This is a case of comparing apples to oranges and is surprising coming from a journalist of Mr. Rodricks' experience. Universities these days belong to the corporate sector. They are run like for-profit businesses because that is the only way they can stay competitive and survive financially.
NEWS
By Dan Rodricks | May 25, 2011
You have to wonder if any of my fellow Marylanders who want to repeal the Dream Act have been to a college campus recently — if not to take classes or hear a lecture, then at least to look around and see who's there. Campuses have plenty of "international students" these days, and more are coming. I'm talkin' nonresident aliens: young people who were born in other countries, raised in other countries and, unless their parents sent them to the United States for prep school, educated in other countries.
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