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By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | December 24, 2012
W. Kennedy Cromwell III, a retired foreign service officer who spent the majority of his 32-year career in Africa, died Dec. 13 from complications of a stroke at the Fairhaven retirement community in Sykesville. The former Washington and Annapolis resident was 88. The son of a stockbroker and a homemaker, William Kennedy Cromwell III — he never used his first name, family members said — was born in Baltimore and raised on Brightside Road in Ruxton. He was also descended from Oliver Cromwell, the English political figure who was lord protector of England, Wales, Scotland and Ireland from 1653 to 1658.
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By Ian Duncan, The Baltimore Sun | April 27, 2013
Friends and former classmates gathered Saturday at Johns Hopkins University to remember Anne Smedinghoff, a Foreign Service officer who was killed in a bombing in Afghanistan earlier this month, sharing stories of a too-short life marked by adventure. As photographs of Smedinghoff in front of monuments and ruins around the world flashed by on projector screens, friends recalled her various escapades, including a coast-to-coast cycling trip, which saw the young woman eat a live bug to fulfill an item on a scavenger hunt list.
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NEWS
By Sam Howe Verhovek and Sam Howe Verhovek,Los Angeles Times | April 1, 2007
Plentywood, Mont. -- Dave Grimland spent nearly 30 years as a Foreign Service officer -- "telling the U.S. side of the story," he says -- in Bangladesh, India, Cyprus, Turkey and other nations with large Muslim populations. He wrote ambassadors' speeches, arranged cultural gatherings, and more than once hunkered down as angry mobs gathered outside the embassy to protest American policy. Now retired and living in rural Montana, Grimland is once again telling a side of the story -- only this time, in quiet pockets of the Big Sky State, he's trying to tell the Muslim side to non-Muslim Americans.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | February 3, 2013
Christopher Van Hollen Sr., a retired Foreign Service officer and ambassador to Sri Lanka, died of Alzheimer's disease complications Jan. 30 at the Washington Home and Hospice. The former Baltimore resident was 90. Born in Baltimore and raised in Cedarcroft, he was the grandson of George Henry Van Hollen, a seafood packer and owner of the Atlantic Packing Co. The family also developed the Cedarcroft section of North Baltimore and lent its name to Hollen Road. His father, Donald Van Hollen, was a Baltimore Gas and Electric Co. employee who later worked at the family's seafood business.
NEWS
By Ian Duncan, The Baltimore Sun | April 27, 2013
Friends and former classmates gathered Saturday at Johns Hopkins University to remember Anne Smedinghoff, a Foreign Service officer who was killed in a bombing in Afghanistan earlier this month, sharing stories of a too-short life marked by adventure. As photographs of Smedinghoff in front of monuments and ruins around the world flashed by on projector screens, friends recalled her various escapades, including a coast-to-coast cycling trip, which saw the young woman eat a live bug to fulfill an item on a scavenger hunt list.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | August 13, 2012
Deirdre Diane "Dee" Huddles, a master gardener who was co-founder of a gardening services company, was killed Wednesday in an automobile accident near Butler. The Glyndon resident was 69. Baltimore County police reported that Ms. Huddles was driving north on Falls Road near Butler about 9 p.m. when her 2009 Subaru Forester was involved in an accident with a truck, which caused her car to overturn. She was pronounced dead at the scene. The accident remains under investigation by county police.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | February 3, 2013
Christopher Van Hollen Sr., a retired Foreign Service officer and ambassador to Sri Lanka, died of Alzheimer's disease complications Jan. 30 at the Washington Home and Hospice. The former Baltimore resident was 90. Born in Baltimore and raised in Cedarcroft, he was the grandson of George Henry Van Hollen, a seafood packer and owner of the Atlantic Packing Co. The family also developed the Cedarcroft section of North Baltimore and lent its name to Hollen Road. His father, Donald Van Hollen, was a Baltimore Gas and Electric Co. employee who later worked at the family's seafood business.
NEWS
June 13, 2000
Bert C. Moore, 65, a foreign service officer who was one of the 52 Americans held hostage at the U.S. Embassy in Iran from 1979 to 1981, died of cancer Thursday in Homosassa, Fla. During his foreign service career, he served in Washington and at U.S. embassies and consulates in Canada, Rhodesia, Malawi, France, Zaire, Iran, Spain, Nigeria, Indonesia and India.
NEWS
August 26, 1992
Stanley Woodward Sr., 93, the American ambassador to Canada in the Truman administration, died Aug. 17 at his home in Washington. He was a foreign service officer in Europe and Haiti from the mid-1920s to the mid-1930s before returning to Philadelphia as commissioner of Fairmount Park. He returned to the foreign service in 1937, serving first as assistant chief of protocol and then as chief of protocol at the State Department until his appointment as ambassador in 1950. After leaving the Foreign Service in 1953, he founded the Woodward Foundation, which was involved in expanding educational opportunities and offering college scholarships to students in the Washington public schools.
NEWS
June 22, 2009
HEYWARD ISHAM, 82 Key Cold War diplomat Heyward Isham, 82, a career Foreign Service officer and a Russian scholar who held key posts during the Cold War and the conflict in Vietnam, died Thursday at a hospital near his Long Island home. He had complications from an infection and pulmonary fibrosis. During the Vietnam War, Isham served in the early 1970s as a leader of the U.S. delegation to the Paris peace talks and was directly involved in negotiations with the Vietnamese. The talks led to the accords that ended direct U.S. military involvement in Vietnam.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | December 24, 2012
W. Kennedy Cromwell III, a retired foreign service officer who spent the majority of his 32-year career in Africa, died Dec. 13 from complications of a stroke at the Fairhaven retirement community in Sykesville. The former Washington and Annapolis resident was 88. The son of a stockbroker and a homemaker, William Kennedy Cromwell III — he never used his first name, family members said — was born in Baltimore and raised on Brightside Road in Ruxton. He was also descended from Oliver Cromwell, the English political figure who was lord protector of England, Wales, Scotland and Ireland from 1653 to 1658.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | August 13, 2012
Deirdre Diane "Dee" Huddles, a master gardener who was co-founder of a gardening services company, was killed Wednesday in an automobile accident near Butler. The Glyndon resident was 69. Baltimore County police reported that Ms. Huddles was driving north on Falls Road near Butler about 9 p.m. when her 2009 Subaru Forester was involved in an accident with a truck, which caused her car to overturn. She was pronounced dead at the scene. The accident remains under investigation by county police.
NEWS
By Sam Howe Verhovek and Sam Howe Verhovek,Los Angeles Times | April 1, 2007
Plentywood, Mont. -- Dave Grimland spent nearly 30 years as a Foreign Service officer -- "telling the U.S. side of the story," he says -- in Bangladesh, India, Cyprus, Turkey and other nations with large Muslim populations. He wrote ambassadors' speeches, arranged cultural gatherings, and more than once hunkered down as angry mobs gathered outside the embassy to protest American policy. Now retired and living in rural Montana, Grimland is once again telling a side of the story -- only this time, in quiet pockets of the Big Sky State, he's trying to tell the Muslim side to non-Muslim Americans.
NEWS
June 23, 1993
More than 300 supporters of Anne Arundel County Executive Robert R. Neall shelled out $250 apiece last night on behalf of the could-be, might-be Republican candidate for governor in 1994.The 44-year-old first-term county executive has been making the rounds like a candidate, attending about 14 Republican Lincoln Day dinners on the Eastern Shore, and in Western and Southern Maryland.But the uncertainty has left some Republicans a bit antsy. They say 1994 could be a big year for Republicans in Maryland but contend they are getting off to a slow start because of Mr. Neall's hesitancy and that of 2nd District Rep. Helen Delich Bentley, who also has been toying with the idea of running for governor.
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