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Foreign Ownership

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November 29, 1990
The takeover of big American entertainment companies by foreign owners will change the content of TV programs and movies in America in the near future, according to a majority of respondents to "It's Your Call," The Evening Sun's phone survey on topical issues.The majority, 54.5 percent, or 115 of 211 callers, "believe foreign ownership will change content" of entertainment. The other 96 callers, 45.5 percent, "do not believe" that will happen."It's Your Call" represents a sampling of opinions from certain segments of the community, but it is not balanced demographically, as would be done in a scientific public opinion poll.
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FEATURES
By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | September 25, 2012
UniStar Nuclear Energy has asked the federal Nuclear Regulatory Commission to review the rejection of the French-controlled company's bid to build a third reactor at Calvert Cliffs nuclear power plant. UniStar filed a petition Monday asking for a hearing before the five member commission on the Atomic Safety and Licensing Board's ruling that the company is ineligible for a reactor operating license because federal law bars foreign ownership of a nuclear plant. The licensing board on Aug. 30 gave the company 60 days to find a U.S. partner or its application would be shelved.
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NEWS
By New York Times News Service | November 30, 1994
NEW YORK -- In a direct challenge to the very existence of the Fox television network, NBC will file a petition with the Federal Communications Commission today asserting that the stations that form the heart of Fox are illegally foreign-owned.NBC will ask the FCC to rule either that Fox must drastically reduce its level of foreign ownership or that all other U.S. networks may seek unlimited foreign investment.NBC contends that if the FCC explicitly sanctions the ownership arrangement that underpins Fox, in which more than 99 percent of the equity is held by Rupert Murdoch's News Corp.
FEATURES
By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | August 31, 2012
Once promoted as the vanguard of a "nuclear renaissance," a proposed new reactor at the Calvert Cliffs nuclear power plant in Southern Maryland now faces a major new roadblock, with federal regulators threatening to shelve the troubled $9.6 billion project unless the French-controlled developer comes up with a U.S. partner in the next two months. The ruling Thursday by the Atomic Safety and Licensing Board was not unexpected, as the board's parent Nuclear Regulatory Commission had warned Unistar Nuclear Energy more than a year ago that it could not get a license for the Maryland reactor without a U.S. partner.
NEWS
By McClatchy News Service | January 10, 1991
WASHINGTON -- Lawmakers and environmentalists praised a new agreement yesterday that will result in a non-profit group's buying the Yosemite Park and Curry Co., but they questioned the way the deal came about and the future of other national park concessionaires.Curry runs hotels and other concessions at Yosemite National Park.When its parent company, MCA Inc., was sold for $6.6 billion to a Japanese conglomerate, Interior Secretary Manuel Lujan Jr. and others objected to foreign ownership of a national park concessionaire.
BUSINESS
By Hanah Cho, The Baltimore Sun | December 8, 2010
UniStar Nuclear Energy on Wednesday told federal regulators it has implemented a plan that includes putting American citizens in key corporate positions to ensure U.S. control over the proposed third reactor at Calvert Cliffs in Southern Maryland. Unistar, owned by French energy company EDF, made the pledge to the Nuclear Regulatory Commission as it is seeking a license to own and operate the plant. Unistar executives requested the meeting with the NRC a month after EDF took full ownership of a nuclear-development joint venture from Baltimore's Constellation Energy Group.
NEWS
September 10, 1995
Cuba's new law encouraging foreign investment is a sign that its communism is played out. In this, Cuba is joining such countries as China and Vietnam that mean to retain monolithic Communist Party power in the political sphere while freeing enterprise and welcoming foreign investment in economic life. Never mind that in both South Korea and Taiwan, capitalist freedom created pressures for political democracy that could not be resisted.Without Soviet subsidy, Communist Cuba is fraying away.
BUSINESS
By Suzanne Wooton and Suzanne Wooton,Staff Writer | August 20, 1993
WASHINGTON -- Significant tax relief and regulatory reform must occur to help pull the nation's beleaguered airlines out of their financial hole, a federal commission created to study the industry reported yesterday.The 15-member commission, created by President Clinton and Congress to study the plight of the airline and aerospace industries, formally proposed a two-year exemption from the new, 4.3 cent-per-gallon federal fuel tax, along with cuts in other taxes, such as those imposed on passengers and cargo.
SPORTS
January 25, 1992
Baseball's ownership committee said yesterday that a Japanese-led proposal to buy the Seattle Mariners won't be taken under consideration unless the group reaches a tentative deal with owner Jeff Smulyan.The group headed by Hiroshi Yamauchi, president of Nintendo Co. Ltd., on Thursday offered to buy the financially troubled team for $100 million, with the Japanese interests controlling 60 percent of the club.The owners might have put off action merely to buy time and consult their lawyers.
NEWS
By Jerry M. Landay | January 10, 1995
IN THE CYBERWORLD beyond governments, run by electronic traders in finance, information, and amusements, Rupert Murdoch is the single most dominant force. He is well on his way toward forming the first truly global multimedia network.The $4.5 million advance that his HarperCollins publishers had offered new Speaker of the House Newt Gingrich for two books would have been a modest expenditure for an enterprise that, in 1990, Mr. Murdoch plucked from a tidal wave of debt more than $7 billion deep.
NEWS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | August 30, 2012
Federal regulators denied a license Thursday to the French-controlled company for a proposed third nuclear reactor at the Calvert Cliffs nuclear power plant in Southern Maryland, giving the company 60 days to find a U.S. partner. At the end of those 60 days, the three judges of the Atomic Safety and Licensing Board wrote, they would be forced to terminate the company's application proceedings entirely. The decision follows warnings from the Nuclear Regulatory Commission in April 2011 that UniStar Nuclear Energy, which is owned by Electricite de France, is not eligible to control the proposed $9.6 billion Calvert Cliffs 3 project under its current ownership structure.
BUSINESS
By Hanah Cho, The Baltimore Sun | December 8, 2010
UniStar Nuclear Energy on Wednesday told federal regulators it has implemented a plan that includes putting American citizens in key corporate positions to ensure U.S. control over the proposed third reactor at Calvert Cliffs in Southern Maryland. Unistar, owned by French energy company EDF, made the pledge to the Nuclear Regulatory Commission as it is seeking a license to own and operate the plant. Unistar executives requested the meeting with the NRC a month after EDF took full ownership of a nuclear-development joint venture from Baltimore's Constellation Energy Group.
NEWS
By Bill Atkinson and Bill Atkinson,SUN STAFF | June 4, 1998
For the past three years, 29 of the world's richest countries have been at the negotiating table cajoling, coaxing and arguing with one another to create a set of common rules governing foreign investment.It is a major undertaking. The goal is to hammer out a treaty, called the Multilateral Agreement on Investment (MAI), that would make it easier for an investor to buy or invest in a business in another country. Negotiations, held in Paris at the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development, have not gone smoothly.
NEWS
September 10, 1995
Cuba's new law encouraging foreign investment is a sign that its communism is played out. In this, Cuba is joining such countries as China and Vietnam that mean to retain monolithic Communist Party power in the political sphere while freeing enterprise and welcoming foreign investment in economic life. Never mind that in both South Korea and Taiwan, capitalist freedom created pressures for political democracy that could not be resisted.Without Soviet subsidy, Communist Cuba is fraying away.
NEWS
By Jerry M. Landay | January 10, 1995
IN THE CYBERWORLD beyond governments, run by electronic traders in finance, information, and amusements, Rupert Murdoch is the single most dominant force. He is well on his way toward forming the first truly global multimedia network.The $4.5 million advance that his HarperCollins publishers had offered new Speaker of the House Newt Gingrich for two books would have been a modest expenditure for an enterprise that, in 1990, Mr. Murdoch plucked from a tidal wave of debt more than $7 billion deep.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | November 30, 1994
NEW YORK -- In a direct challenge to the very existence of the Fox television network, NBC will file a petition with the Federal Communications Commission today asserting that the stations that form the heart of Fox are illegally foreign-owned.NBC will ask the FCC to rule either that Fox must drastically reduce its level of foreign ownership or that all other U.S. networks may seek unlimited foreign investment.NBC contends that if the FCC explicitly sanctions the ownership arrangement that underpins Fox, in which more than 99 percent of the equity is held by Rupert Murdoch's News Corp.
NEWS
By Bill Atkinson and Bill Atkinson,SUN STAFF | June 4, 1998
For the past three years, 29 of the world's richest countries have been at the negotiating table cajoling, coaxing and arguing with one another to create a set of common rules governing foreign investment.It is a major undertaking. The goal is to hammer out a treaty, called the Multilateral Agreement on Investment (MAI), that would make it easier for an investor to buy or invest in a business in another country. Negotiations, held in Paris at the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development, have not gone smoothly.
BUSINESS
By Kim Clark and Kim Clark,Staff Writer | March 19, 1993
Workers would prefer long days, short weeksHere's a math puzzle: Sometimes 40 is better than 40.Although a new Gallup Organization survey says most workers would rather put in four 10-hour days a week, employers prefer five eight-hour shifts, even though both provide 40 work hours a week.Lori Whaley, controller of Hunt Valley-based McEnroe Business Systems, would gladly trade longer working days for three-day weekends. But the small company, which sells and services office equipment, can't afford to let any post go unfilled during the work week, she says.
BUSINESS
By Suzanne Wooton and Suzanne Wooton,Staff Writer | August 20, 1993
WASHINGTON -- Significant tax relief and regulatory reform must occur to help pull the nation's beleaguered airlines out of their financial hole, a federal commission created to study the industry reported yesterday.The 15-member commission, created by President Clinton and Congress to study the plight of the airline and aerospace industries, formally proposed a two-year exemption from the new, 4.3 cent-per-gallon federal fuel tax, along with cuts in other taxes, such as those imposed on passengers and cargo.
BUSINESS
By Kim Clark and Kim Clark,Staff Writer | March 19, 1993
Workers would prefer long days, short weeksHere's a math puzzle: Sometimes 40 is better than 40.Although a new Gallup Organization survey says most workers would rather put in four 10-hour days a week, employers prefer five eight-hour shifts, even though both provide 40 work hours a week.Lori Whaley, controller of Hunt Valley-based McEnroe Business Systems, would gladly trade longer working days for three-day weekends. But the small company, which sells and services office equipment, can't afford to let any post go unfilled during the work week, she says.
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