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By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | May 14, 1999
LONDON -- An embittered former British spy has used the Internet to make public the names of a large number of secret agents, but officials in London said yesterday that the World Wide Web site had been shut down and no duplicates had surfaced.The Foreign Office said British security and the lives of more than 100 people were put in jeopardy by the action, which was attributed to Richard Tomlinson, 35, an agent of the Secret Intelligence Service, formerly known as MI6, who was let go in 1995 and later served a jail term for violating Britain's Official Secrets Act.A spokesman for the Foreign Office said yesterday that the Web site, based in the United States, had been taken off the Internet "apparently at the initiative of the provider."
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NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | February 3, 2013
Christopher Van Hollen Sr., a retired Foreign Service officer and ambassador to Sri Lanka, died of Alzheimer's disease complications Jan. 30 at the Washington Home and Hospice. The former Baltimore resident was 90. Born in Baltimore and raised in Cedarcroft, he was the grandson of George Henry Van Hollen, a seafood packer and owner of the Atlantic Packing Co. The family also developed the Cedarcroft section of North Baltimore and lent its name to Hollen Road. His father, Donald Van Hollen, was a Baltimore Gas and Electric Co. employee who later worked at the family's seafood business.
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NEWS
September 2, 1996
ACROSS THE globe, millions of people who don't trust their own government media believe the BBC. It is the Free World's most potent weapon against any "ism," the envy of other broadcasters and the most potent force in projecting British influence in a post-imperial world. Britain ought to be trying to strengthen the World Service of the British Broadcasting Corp. Instead, Britain is planning to dismantle it.The World Service is run with its own correspondents, production and bureaucracy separate from the BBC domestic organization.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | December 24, 2012
W. Kennedy Cromwell III, a retired foreign service officer who spent the majority of his 32-year career in Africa, died Dec. 13 from complications of a stroke at the Fairhaven retirement community in Sykesville. The former Washington and Annapolis resident was 88. The son of a stockbroker and a homemaker, William Kennedy Cromwell III — he never used his first name, family members said — was born in Baltimore and raised on Brightside Road in Ruxton. He was also descended from Oliver Cromwell, the English political figure who was lord protector of England, Wales, Scotland and Ireland from 1653 to 1658.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | March 27, 2007
LONDON -- The stalemate over the 15 British naval personnel seized by Iranian forces north of the Persian Gulf last week continued yesterday, with Britain repeating its demands for their immediate release and Iran refusing to say where exactly they were being held or what would happen to them. But Geoffrey Adams, the British ambassador to Iran, met yesterday with Iranian officials in Tehran, the British Foreign Office said, and was told that the 15 - eight sailors and seven marines - were in good health.
NEWS
By Gilbert A. Lewthwaite and Gilbert A. Lewthwaite,London Bureau of The Sun | November 2, 1990
LONDON -- Britain objected yesterday to the German government over a planned trip by former West German Chancellor Willy Brandt to Baghdad for talks with Iraqi President Saddam Hussein.The Bonn government has approved the initiative by Mr. Brandt, 1972 winner of the Nobel Peace Prize, despite agreement at the European summit in Rome last weekend to discourage such visits.British Foreign Secretary Douglas Hurd told the German Foreign Ministry that the Brandt trip was contrary to the Rome agreement and "must be discouraged."
NEWS
By Todd Richissin and Todd Richissin,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | July 22, 2002
LONDON - The silence about Charlie Chaplin has been broken. Much of the chat of his native England yesterday was about how he was denied knighthood for nearly 20 years because prudish Americans felt he was a Communist little tramp. After decades of mystery, British government documents - which were secret until their release over the weekend - show that the snub of the colorful black-and-white movie actor was primarily the result of his marriages to two 16-year-olds and American reaction to them.
NEWS
By Ramin Mostaghim and Kim Murphy | April 2, 2007
TEHRAN, Iran -- More than 150 students pelted the British Embassy here with firecrackers and a smoke grenade yesterday, demanding an apology and the closure of the mission after Iran's detention of 15 British sailors and marines in the northern Persian Gulf. Shouting slogans such as "Death to Britain" and carrying banners with a call to "finally wipe Israel from the face of the Earth," hard-line Islamist students attempted to scale the embassy walls and pull down the flag but were rebuffed by riot police.
NEWS
By Frank Langfitt and Frank Langfitt,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | October 14, 2001
ISLAMABAD, Pakistan - Men armed with submachine guns stood guard yesterday outside the two-story beige building housing the offices of the Rabita Trust here. A bearded man wearing a vest and a flowing shirt and baggy pants said that no one inside was granting interviews. "I can't say anything," said the man, before disappearing back into the offices. It was one day after the U.S. Treasury Department named the organization's office in the Pakistani city of Lahore as being among 39 individuals and groups with suspected terrorist ties.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | July 5, 2003
LONDON - The families of two British terrorism suspects who are likely to be tried by military tribunals at the American naval base at Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, expressed outrage yesterday at what they said was American high-handedness and flouting of international law, and added that they doubted the men would receive fair trials. The family of a third person, an Australian, confirmed that he also had been named by the authorities. Britain and Australia were allies of the United States in the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan, and both have urged Washington to expedite the cases against their citizens.
NEWS
By Ramin Mostaghim and Kim Murphy | April 2, 2007
TEHRAN, Iran -- More than 150 students pelted the British Embassy here with firecrackers and a smoke grenade yesterday, demanding an apology and the closure of the mission after Iran's detention of 15 British sailors and marines in the northern Persian Gulf. Shouting slogans such as "Death to Britain" and carrying banners with a call to "finally wipe Israel from the face of the Earth," hard-line Islamist students attempted to scale the embassy walls and pull down the flag but were rebuffed by riot police.
NEWS
By Sam Howe Verhovek and Sam Howe Verhovek,Los Angeles Times | April 1, 2007
Plentywood, Mont. -- Dave Grimland spent nearly 30 years as a Foreign Service officer -- "telling the U.S. side of the story," he says -- in Bangladesh, India, Cyprus, Turkey and other nations with large Muslim populations. He wrote ambassadors' speeches, arranged cultural gatherings, and more than once hunkered down as angry mobs gathered outside the embassy to protest American policy. Now retired and living in rural Montana, Grimland is once again telling a side of the story -- only this time, in quiet pockets of the Big Sky State, he's trying to tell the Muslim side to non-Muslim Americans.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | March 27, 2007
LONDON -- The stalemate over the 15 British naval personnel seized by Iranian forces north of the Persian Gulf last week continued yesterday, with Britain repeating its demands for their immediate release and Iran refusing to say where exactly they were being held or what would happen to them. But Geoffrey Adams, the British ambassador to Iran, met yesterday with Iranian officials in Tehran, the British Foreign Office said, and was told that the 15 - eight sailors and seven marines - were in good health.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | July 5, 2003
LONDON - The families of two British terrorism suspects who are likely to be tried by military tribunals at the American naval base at Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, expressed outrage yesterday at what they said was American high-handedness and flouting of international law, and added that they doubted the men would receive fair trials. The family of a third person, an Australian, confirmed that he also had been named by the authorities. Britain and Australia were allies of the United States in the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan, and both have urged Washington to expedite the cases against their citizens.
NEWS
By Todd Richissin and Todd Richissin,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | July 22, 2002
LONDON - The silence about Charlie Chaplin has been broken. Much of the chat of his native England yesterday was about how he was denied knighthood for nearly 20 years because prudish Americans felt he was a Communist little tramp. After decades of mystery, British government documents - which were secret until their release over the weekend - show that the snub of the colorful black-and-white movie actor was primarily the result of his marriages to two 16-year-olds and American reaction to them.
NEWS
By Frank Langfitt and Frank Langfitt,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | October 14, 2001
ISLAMABAD, Pakistan - Men armed with submachine guns stood guard yesterday outside the two-story beige building housing the offices of the Rabita Trust here. A bearded man wearing a vest and a flowing shirt and baggy pants said that no one inside was granting interviews. "I can't say anything," said the man, before disappearing back into the offices. It was one day after the U.S. Treasury Department named the organization's office in the Pakistani city of Lahore as being among 39 individuals and groups with suspected terrorist ties.
NEWS
By Bill Glauber and Bill Glauber,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | June 29, 1997
LONDON -- "We've got three ghosts in the building. We're not sure whom," says Kate Crowe, librarian, tour guide and expert on Britain's treasured set of diplomatic chambers: The Foreign and Commonwealth Office.In this haunted, gorgeous house, Britain's bureaucrats forged and shaped the British Empire. This is where young men stepped into the Colonial Office in search of a job guiding Britain's fortunes in Africa, Asia or the Americas.Calcutta met London at the India Office, a palatial home where maharajas could be summoned and young imperialists could be vetted.
BUSINESS
By Michelle Singletary and Michelle Singletary,Evening Sun Staff | February 25, 1991
The General Assembly's Department of Fiscal Services wants to slash the Maryland International Division's budget by 22 percent. That includes closing its Hong Kong office, which could mean a savings to the state of $488,000.The Maryland International Division, which is budgeted under the state Department of Economic and Employment Development, is responsible for operating four overseas trade and investment offices, located in Tokyo, Brussels, Hong Kong and Taipei, the capital of Taiwan.The proposed budget cuts were presented to the General Assembly last week.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | May 14, 1999
LONDON -- An embittered former British spy has used the Internet to make public the names of a large number of secret agents, but officials in London said yesterday that the World Wide Web site had been shut down and no duplicates had surfaced.The Foreign Office said British security and the lives of more than 100 people were put in jeopardy by the action, which was attributed to Richard Tomlinson, 35, an agent of the Secret Intelligence Service, formerly known as MI6, who was let go in 1995 and later served a jail term for violating Britain's Official Secrets Act.A spokesman for the Foreign Office said yesterday that the Web site, based in the United States, had been taken off the Internet "apparently at the initiative of the provider."
NEWS
By Bill Glauber and Bill Glauber,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | June 29, 1997
LONDON -- "We've got three ghosts in the building. We're not sure whom," says Kate Crowe, librarian, tour guide and expert on Britain's treasured set of diplomatic chambers: The Foreign and Commonwealth Office.In this haunted, gorgeous house, Britain's bureaucrats forged and shaped the British Empire. This is where young men stepped into the Colonial Office in search of a job guiding Britain's fortunes in Africa, Asia or the Americas.Calcutta met London at the India Office, a palatial home where maharajas could be summoned and young imperialists could be vetted.
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