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By Melissa Robbins | November 16, 2000
WHEN Tara Lieberman discovered that her school -- Thomas S. Wootton High in Rockville -- offered a class in the language of her culture, she was thrilled. Now her classmates could learn to communicate with people like her. But when Tara's friends told her they didn't have room for the course because it only counted as an elective, Tara, who is hearing-impaired, was flabbergasted. "ASL [American Sign Language] has a whole separate culture attached to it," she says. "Just like any other language that has its own culture, ASL should be recognized as a foreign language -- if for nothing else, then out of respect for the people who use it."
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NEWS
By Kaitlin Thomas | April 24, 2014
On a recent trip to San Antonio, Texas, I was struck by a realization: Spanish is no longer merely a foreign language; it has officially become a domestic one. Ordering a coffee at Starbucks, having a drink with colleagues at a local restaurant, asking a stranger on the street for directions - all of these are scenarios that would have once, in the not-so-distant past, necessitated an unspoken adherence to a "speak in English" public standard....
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NEWS
By Peter Jensen and Peter Jensen,Sun Staff Writer | February 4, 1994
One thing you can say about Rocio Gonzalez's Spanish class: It keeps rolling along.It rolls through West Baltimore, through Odenton, through Bowie. . . .The usually drowsy commuters boarding the No. 415 commuter train from Baltimore's Penn Station to Washington's Union Station got an eye-opener yesterday: Beginning Spanish en movimiento.Underneath the "no smoking" sign in the last car, Miss Gonzalez invited her captive audience to learn and have a good time -- or at least as much fun as you can at 7:58 a.m. on a Maryland Rail Commuter (MARC)
NEWS
By Larry Schmidt and S. Dallas Dance | March 25, 2013
When today's high school seniors started kindergarten in 2000, there was no iPhone, text messaging was hardly used, and very few K-12 students took online classes. While virtually every other arena has seen rapid change over the past decade, K-12 education has remained virtually the same. However, we cannot successfully educate today's students to succeed in tomorrow's world with yesterday's curriculum and instructional methods. Together, we at the Baltimore County Board of Education and Baltimore County Public Schools propose to propel our school system and students forward with a bold new theory of action.
BUSINESS
By Liz Atwood and Liz Atwood,Evening Sun Staff | August 5, 1991
Mark Ross would like a job in Japan, David Blonder is hoping to settle in France or southern Europe, and Mark Maltby wants to move to Spain.Right now, all three are undergraduate students at the University of Maryland College Park and plan to enter the business school this fall.But they will be seeking a business degree with a difference.Part of their training will include negotiating a mock free-trade agreement with students in Mexico or hammering out a drug policy with students in Argentina.
FEATURES
By ROBERT KANIGEL | June 16, 1991
IN FRENCH, BRIGITTE MICHEL-HEATH NEVER SWORE, NEVER SO MUCH AS A MERDE. AND when she visits friends and family in France, she still doesn't. Yet in English, her second language, she will occasionally resort to an obscenity. "It doesn't mean anything to me," she explains. "I know it's a swear word, but I have none of the emotions that go with it."Ms. Michel-Heath is a native of France. She has lived in Baltimore for 16 years, holds degrees from a top American liberal arts college and a big state university, has read more Herman Melville and Sinclair Lewis than most Americans, and can wield her accepted English with as much finesse as you or I.Yet an unfamiliar accent, like that of the Chesapeake Bay's Eastern Shore, or an unfamiliar expression, like "to case the joint," can throw her. And the way a slight change of preposition can make meaning abruptly change course -- as in break down, break up, break in, break out -- still drives her batty.
NEWS
By Alison Knezevich, The Baltimore Sun | March 21, 2013
Baltimore County schools Superintendent Dallas Dance plans to issue digital devices to middle- and high-school students and wants all children in the school system to graduate bilingual, believing it will make them globally competitive, he said in the county's first state of the schools address Thursday. "Earning a Baltimore County public schools diploma needs to have greater meaning," he told a crowd at Valley Mansion in Cockeysville. The superintendent hopes to see kindergartners learning world languages and older students carrying electronic devices within the next five years, he said in an interview Thursday.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen | fred.rasmussen@baltsun.com | April 10, 2010
Omar V. Pulliam II, a retired Dulaney High School foreign language teacher and election judge who was active in area community theater productions, died Sunday of multiple organ failure at St. Joseph Medical Center. The longtime Ruxton resident was 76. Omar Vernice Pulliam II was born in Asheboro, N.C., and moved with his family in 1942 to Victory Villa in Essex. He graduated from Kenwood High School in 1951 and served in the Army from 1954 to 1956. Mr. Pulliam earned a bachelor's degree from the Johns Hopkins University and a master's degree from George Washington University.
NEWS
By Kris Antonelli and Kris Antonelli,SUN STAFF | March 19, 1999
Learning a foreign language is a "survival skill" for schoolchildren, and county school board members are looking for ways to expand programs beyond the 23 elementary schools that offer those classes. "I believe very strongly in early language skills," Carol S. Parham, superintendent of schools, told the board Wednesday. "It is a survival skill. It is no longer a luxury for our young people in this changing economy and world." The board was discussing ways to expand foreign language programs into the 54 county elementary schools that do not have such instruction.
NEWS
By MARI PERRY and MARI PERRY,CAPITAL NEWS SERVICE | October 28, 2005
Maryland students may soon have another option for foreign language credit: American Sign Language. The state Board of Education decided Tuesday to further explore allowing schools to offer the class for more than elective credit. But several obstacles stand in the way, including a lack of qualified teachers. There are more than 1,300 students in Maryland schools who are deaf or hard of hearing, but State Superintendent Nancy S. Grasmick said she expected a course in sign language would appeal to hearing students, as well as to the hearing impaired.
NEWS
By Alison Knezevich, The Baltimore Sun | March 21, 2013
Baltimore County schools Superintendent Dallas Dance plans to issue digital devices to middle- and high-school students and wants all children in the school system to graduate bilingual, believing it will make them globally competitive, he said in the county's first state of the schools address Thursday. "Earning a Baltimore County public schools diploma needs to have greater meaning," he told a crowd at Valley Mansion in Cockeysville. The superintendent hopes to see kindergartners learning world languages and older students carrying electronic devices within the next five years, he said in an interview Thursday.
NEWS
By Joe Burris, The Baltimore Sun | April 12, 2012
The creators of the language-learning software Rosetta Stone have made it simple to grasp the complexities of Spanish. But can they back it up and Dougie? " Usted and ustedes if you're talking to a group. Start with the ' yo ' form and throw it for a loop!" says "E Rap de Mandatos," a Spanish-learning tune by South River High School foreign language teacher Jodie Hogan, who rewrote the lyrics to the popular song "Teach Me How to Dougie," by Cali Swag District. Hogan has created a book of songs that break down Spanish language concepts into catchy, rhythmic verses that are sung to such melodies as Ricky Martin's "La Copa de la Vida," the "Oompa Loompa Song" from "Willie Wonka and the Chocolate Factory," and the theme from "Gilligan's Island.
NEWS
By Janet Gilbert | July 17, 2010
Most Americans are introduced to a foreign language in a school setting. Of course, you can always spend a lot of money on a special computer program, a series of CDs or DVDs, or an exchange program to become fluent. Or, you can simply try the Janet's World Vehicular Immersion System of language learning, administered absolutely free through your car's GPS system. Yes, in just three weeks, you can become proficient in directional conversation. Imagine impressing your friends with the phrase: "In 300 feet, exit right" in Vietnamese!
NEWS
By Joe Burris, The Baltimore Sun | July 9, 2010
About three dozen students formed rows in the Duncan Hall lobby of Howard Community College and staged an impromptu demonstration of tai chi, a Chinese martial art known for its slow but precise movements. Some students were clearly novices, yet their cadence showed that, at the very least, they were fast learners. The students are enrolled in an intensive summer language program called STARTALK, a federal government initiative designed to increase the number of Americans learning so-called "critical need" languages.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen | fred.rasmussen@baltsun.com | April 10, 2010
Omar V. Pulliam II, a retired Dulaney High School foreign language teacher and election judge who was active in area community theater productions, died Sunday of multiple organ failure at St. Joseph Medical Center. The longtime Ruxton resident was 76. Omar Vernice Pulliam II was born in Asheboro, N.C., and moved with his family in 1942 to Victory Villa in Essex. He graduated from Kenwood High School in 1951 and served in the Army from 1954 to 1956. Mr. Pulliam earned a bachelor's degree from the Johns Hopkins University and a master's degree from George Washington University.
NEWS
By John-John Williams IV | john-john.williams@baltsun.com | February 28, 2010
Board members Allen Dyer and Larry Cohen stood off to the side, involved in a lengthy, heated discussion just minutes after the Howard County school board voted 6-1 Tuesday morning to approve a $675.1 million operating budget for fiscal year 2011. The lone vote of dissent came from Dyer, who opposed the board spending money to provide transportation to parochial school students. During the board's discussion, Dyer said that he was displeased with the board's "lack of direction." The words riled fellow board members, including Cohen, who was now raising his voice.
NEWS
April 21, 2002
Sister Mary Madeleine Doyle, a member of the School Sisters of Notre Dame and a professor emerita of foreign language at the College of Notre Dame of Maryland, died of cancer Thursday at Villa Assumpta, the Baltimore motherhouse of her congregation. She was 97. The former Gertrude A. Doyle attended public schools in Towson before enrolling at the college, where she would later become chairwoman of the foreign language department. She left Notre Dame after her freshman year and, in 1925, she entered the same teaching order of nuns who founded the college.
NEWS
By Lyle Denniston and Lyle Denniston,Washington Bureau of The Sun | May 29, 1991
WASHINGTON -- A divided Supreme Court ruled yesterday that individuals for whom English is a second language may sometimes be barred from juries if prosecutors fear that they will second-guess the translation of foreign-language evidence.Although the court could not gather a majority of justices for any one opinion, the result nevertheless was a 6-3 ruling that seemed to expand the power of prosecutors to use automatic challenges to keep minorities off juries in criminal trials.In a criminal trial, each side -- the prosecution and the defense -- is allowed a set number of automatic, or "peremptory," challenges to keep individual jurors off the case.
NEWS
By Catherine Ingold | June 23, 2008
Maryland has adopted a promising new strategy to deal with the U.S. shortage of skilled foreign language speakers, one that offers a model for other states. A new state law seeks to make better use of an under-valued language asset: immigrants and their descendants. Many of these "heritage speakers" converse in a foreign language at home and learn English at school. This early bilingual experience helps them in mastering critical languages such as Arabic, Persian, Urdu, Chinese and Wolof, to name just a few. Heritage speakers represent the most reliable pool of bilingual talent as our nation plays language catch-up with the rest of the world.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly | June 20, 2008
Arthur Lewis Micozzi, a retired Baltimore County public schools language teacher and administrator, died of cancer yesterday at Stella Maris Hospice in Timonium. The Parkville resident was 72. Born in Mahoningtown, Pa., he earned a bachelor's degree from West Virginia University and a master's degree from what is now Towson University. He moved to Baltimore in 1958 and became a Spanish and English teacher in the Baltimore County public school system. He taught at Overlea and Kenwood high schools.
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