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By Elizabeth Littlefield | July 31, 2014
When President Barack Obama convenes nearly 50 African leaders in Washington next week for the U.S.-Africa Leaders Summit, the grand scale of the event could fill television screens for days. The real action, however, will be the behind-the-scenes, headlong rush by both Africans and Americans to capitalize on a new economic reality: Africa is on the move. And America's businesses and investors have just as many reasons to bring their business cards to the summit as Africans do. Casual political observers often focus on Africa's natural resources, mineral wealth and conflicts as a strategic concern, but Africa is a massive and rapidly growing consumer market that is more fully appreciated by strategic investors with each passing day. Africa's collective GDP surpassed that of Brazil and Russia six years ago, and it is estimated to be $2.6 trillion by 2020.
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NEWS
By Elizabeth Littlefield | July 31, 2014
When President Barack Obama convenes nearly 50 African leaders in Washington next week for the U.S.-Africa Leaders Summit, the grand scale of the event could fill television screens for days. The real action, however, will be the behind-the-scenes, headlong rush by both Africans and Americans to capitalize on a new economic reality: Africa is on the move. And America's businesses and investors have just as many reasons to bring their business cards to the summit as Africans do. Casual political observers often focus on Africa's natural resources, mineral wealth and conflicts as a strategic concern, but Africa is a massive and rapidly growing consumer market that is more fully appreciated by strategic investors with each passing day. Africa's collective GDP surpassed that of Brazil and Russia six years ago, and it is estimated to be $2.6 trillion by 2020.
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NEWS
By Jonathan Paul Yates | November 27, 1990
Silver Spring. MANY ISSUES are called before Congress, but few have been chosen for the attention focused on foreign investment. Over 20 bills have been introduced concerning various aspects of foreign investment, including disclosure requirements for the owners, tax avoidance and the handling of crucial technology.Foreign investment, ranging from banks in Manhattan to beachfront property in Maui, now totals more than $663 billion than Americans own abroad, making the United States the world's most indebted nation.
NEWS
By Rob Sobhani | August 20, 2012
Maryland's economy is headed in the wrong direction. While the unemployment rate here is better than the national average, it remains high at 6.9 percent. What's more, Maryland actually lost 11,000 jobs in the month of June, the third highest loss in the country. With its natural resources and highly educated workforce, Maryland should be booming, not receding. What our state needs is a new vision to catapult its huge potential into a global reality. Going global is the key. Thanks to our highly-ranked schools and universities, Maryland has a knowledge-based economy.
NEWS
By Jonathan Paul Yates and Jonathan Paul Yates,Mr. Yates, a former congressional aide, is a free-lance writer on international trade issues | November 28, 1990
Silver Spring. GOING TO an Orioles game is no longer quite the national pastime it once was.Eat a Ball Park hot dog at Memorial Stadium, and you'll be consuming a British product. French's mustard on the hot dog: British too. Soft shelled crabs from the Eastern Shore before or after the game are from the Japanese-owned Handy Soft Shell Crab Co. in Crisfield. Beer from A&P, German. Springsteen's ''Glory Days'' played between innings is the property of CBS Sony, a Japanese company. Buyers from Japan even made a serious effort to purchase the Orioles then they were for sale in 1988.
NEWS
June 17, 2004
IN THE PAST YEAR, some large foreign investors were for the first time allowed to enter China's domestic stock market to buy shares of Chinese firms. This includes shares of part of Norinco, China North Industries Group - a transnational conglomerate that was founded by the People's Liberation Army, that retains strong military ties, that makes everything from baby shoes to missiles, and that has drawn U.S. sanctions for arming Iran. Given the lack of disclosure in China, foreign investors and technology traders with Norinco and other Chinese firms cannot know if their resources will end up serving China's long-term, well-coordinated strategic plan to compete with American economic, military and political power.
NEWS
By KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | January 2, 2002
BUENOS AIRES, Argentina - Eduardo Duhalde, a populist who opposes U.S.-backed free market reforms, was chosen yesterday as this insolvent country's fifth president in less than two weeks. After marathon closed-door negotiations, Duhalde was elected in an emergency session of Congress to serve the final two years of the term of Fernando de la Rua, who resigned Dec. 20 after violent protests against his government. Three interim presidents followed before most major political parties threw their support to Duhalde, who had lost to de la Rua in the 1999 presidential election.
NEWS
By Scott Shane and Scott Shane,Moscow Bureau of The Sun | October 27, 1990
MOSCOW -- President Mikhail S. Gorbachev yesterday granted foreigners the right to 100-percent ownership of businesses in the Soviet Union, committing yet another heresy against Marxist orthodoxy in a move to lure investment in the ailing Soviet economy.The decree, issued under special powers granted to Mr. Gorbachev by the Soviet parliament, also said foreign businesses would be permitted to take out profits earned in Soviet rubles. But the ruble is not freely convertible, and the decree did not make clear how repatriation of profits would be accomplished.
NEWS
By Walter F. Roche Jr. and Walter F. Roche Jr.,SUN STAFF | May 9, 2001
In a decision offering hope to foreign investors seeking permanent U.S. residency, a federal judge has ordered the U.S. Immigration and Naturalization Service to reconsider the impending expulsion of a Chinese national. U.S. District Judge George H. King, sitting in Los Angeles, upheld the right of the INS to set tougher standards for the investor visa program in a 23-page decision dated May 3. The judge also said the INS must consider whether retroactively imposing those new standards on people who had already signed up for the program would create an undue hardship.
NEWS
April 21, 1999
ABDELAZIZ Bouteflika became foreign minister of Algeria at age 25 in 1965 and made it a home for Third World revolutionary rhetoric. Thirteen years later, he was accused of embezzlement. Instead of rising to the presidency then, he has spent most of his time since 1980 in comfortable exile. Now he is elected president with the favor of the generals he had served and then fled.Mr. Bouteflika won 74 percent of the vote with a 60 percent turnout, if you want to believe the official tally. Ahmed Taleb Ibrahimi, who had conducted the audit accusing Mr. Bouteflika two decades ago and succeeded him as foreign minister, came in a distant second with 12.5 percent.
BUSINESS
By Matthew Hay Brown and Matthew Hay Brown,Sun reporter | July 12, 2007
WASHINGTON -- Nearly 18 months after a plan to sell port operations in Baltimore and other cities to Dubai Ports World ignited a furor, the House voted overwhelmingly yesterday to strengthen federal government review when "critical infrastructure" is transferred to foreign investors. The legislation, which drew similarly broad support last month in the Senate, would formalize the process by which the Defense, Homeland Security and other departments screen proposed sales. It would expand the types of transactions that would trigger additional investigation and involve the director of national intelligence in the process.
NEWS
By Douglas Birch and Douglas Birch,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | April 24, 2005
MOSCOW - Under different circumstances, the 10-month trial of the businessman who was once Russia's richest man might have been regarded as a triumph of law and order over privilege and power. Instead, human rights campaigners say, the trial of billionaire Mikhail B. Khodorkovsky, former chief executive of the Yukos oil company, has been a glaring case of Russian justice warped by greed and Kremlin politics. As early as Wednesday, Khodorkovsky and fellow defendant Platon Lebedev, another major Yukos shareholder, will file into a cramped Moscow courtroom and hear the verdict of the three-judge court.
NEWS
June 17, 2004
IN THE PAST YEAR, some large foreign investors were for the first time allowed to enter China's domestic stock market to buy shares of Chinese firms. This includes shares of part of Norinco, China North Industries Group - a transnational conglomerate that was founded by the People's Liberation Army, that retains strong military ties, that makes everything from baby shoes to missiles, and that has drawn U.S. sanctions for arming Iran. Given the lack of disclosure in China, foreign investors and technology traders with Norinco and other Chinese firms cannot know if their resources will end up serving China's long-term, well-coordinated strategic plan to compete with American economic, military and political power.
TOPIC
By Michael Hill and Michael Hill,SUN STAFF | February 8, 2004
Once upon a time, the nation's economy seemed to follow fundamental rules, even in the red. The extra money sent out in the economy by budget deficits stimulated a sluggish marketplace. Good. But with all that money buying goods but not producing any, the deficit raised prices and thus inflation. Bad. If the government stayed in the red too long, it borrowed so much money that the price of that money - the interest rates - would go up. Also bad. The conclusion was that budget deficits were fine if used for a short period as a stimulus.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | August 4, 2002
Foreign investors, who once joined with confident Americans in a wave of spectacular acquisitions and business spending that helped power the 1990s economic boom, are turning cautious about the U.S. economy. That is compounding the current weakness and making it harder to achieve a robust recovery from last year's recession. With fresh acquisitions almost nil, foreign direct investment in the United States - the technical name for acquiring a company or establishing one - plummeted last year to $124 billion and started out this year at an even slower pace, the Commerce Department reports.
NEWS
By KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | January 2, 2002
BUENOS AIRES, Argentina - Eduardo Duhalde, a populist who opposes U.S.-backed free market reforms, was chosen yesterday as this insolvent country's fifth president in less than two weeks. After marathon closed-door negotiations, Duhalde was elected in an emergency session of Congress to serve the final two years of the term of Fernando de la Rua, who resigned Dec. 20 after violent protests against his government. Three interim presidents followed before most major political parties threw their support to Duhalde, who had lost to de la Rua in the 1999 presidential election.
NEWS
By Knight-Ridder News Service | November 25, 1994
Israelis are growing grapefruit in Cuba, the Dutch are manufacturing laundry detergent, Canadians are prospecting for gold and oil, Mexicans are working on the phone system, and Spaniards are building seaside hotels.After several years of merely nibbling, foreign investors are pumping money and technology into Cuba at a rate that could help rescue the island's battered economy if -- and it's a big if -- all the deals are completed.Foreign investment "is surmounting obstacles that at times seemed insurmountable," Carlos Lage, an architect of Cuba's economic survival plan, boasted last month at a Havana trade fair.
BUSINESS
By Abbe Gluck | July 14, 1996
THE COMMERCE Department said last week that direct spending by foreigners to acquire or establish U.S. businesses rose 19.2 percent to $54.4 billion in 1995, marking the third straight year foreign direct investment has increased.German investments topped the list at $14.2 billion, followed by Britain's $9.7 billion. But, while German investments increased fourfold since 1994, the British figures marked a 44 percent decline from a year earlier.And, although investment increased, 1995's 19.2 percent jump fell far short of the 71 percent rise in 1993 and the 74 percent rise in 1994.
NEWS
By Walter F. Roche Jr. and Walter F. Roche Jr.,SUN STAFF | November 30, 2001
Citing the threatened "perversion" of an immigration program that allows foreign investors to gain permanent U.S. residency, a federal appeals court has ruled the U.S. Immigration and Naturalization Service was justified in setting strict new standards. The brief decision issued by the 9th Circuit Court of Appeals in San Francisco could mean that hundreds of foreigners who sought permanent green cards under a decade-old investor visa program will have to leave the country. Under the program, established by Congress in 1990, foreigners can become permanent U.S. residents by investing at least $500,000 in an American business.
NEWS
By Walter F. Roche Jr. and Walter F. Roche Jr.,SUN STAFF | May 9, 2001
In a decision offering hope to foreign investors seeking permanent U.S. residency, a federal judge has ordered the U.S. Immigration and Naturalization Service to reconsider the impending expulsion of a Chinese national. U.S. District Judge George H. King, sitting in Los Angeles, upheld the right of the INS to set tougher standards for the investor visa program in a 23-page decision dated May 3. The judge also said the INS must consider whether retroactively imposing those new standards on people who had already signed up for the program would create an undue hardship.
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