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NEWS
May 17, 2004
TAKING ADVANTAGE of the relaxed standard for secret foreign intelligence searches it gained with the USA Patriot Act in 2001, the Justice Department has steamed forward in its use of these surveillance warrants. While it is reassuring that Justice is taking terror investigations seriously, it also is a worry. These warrants are so secret that people who aren't later charged - the vast majority - never know the government was watching them. And people who are charged are never permitted to see the warrant, so they cannot defend themselves in court against unreasonable snooping.
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NEWS
By New York Times News Service | October 11, 2007
WASHINGTON -- Two Congressional panels yesterday rejected President Bush's request to renew without added restrictions his administration's broad eavesdropping authority, and instead adopted a measure that gives federal judges greater oversight authority over foreign electronic surveillance conducted by the National Security Agency. The bill approved by the House Judiciary and Intelligence committees was along straight party lines, just as they split to defeat the administration's proposal.
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NEWS
By GAIL GIBSON and GAIL GIBSON,SUN REPORTER | July 14, 2006
The highly secret spy court that would pass judgment on the National Security Agency's warrantless surveillance program under a deal announced yesterday has issued just one public ruling in its nearly 30-year history and from its inception was never intended to consider the kind of complex constitutional questions at issue in the heated debate over the government's counterterrorism methods. Instead, judges on the nation's most shrouded court sit primarily to rule on government applications to search the homes or monitor the phones and e-mail of terrorism suspects inside the United States - requests that almost always are approved.
NEWS
By Peter Spiegel and Peter Spiegel,LOS ANGELES TIMES | September 19, 2007
WASHINGTON -- The fight over the Bush administration's warrantless wiretapping program began anew yesterday as the nation's top spy urged Congress to make permanent a law that gives intelligence agencies more latitude to monitor overseas phone calls and e-mails. Director of National Intelligence Mike McConnell testified that the administration needs the expanded powers because old versions of the law forced intelligence agents to obtain time-consuming warrants for any communications that passed through U.S. networks - even if the call was between two foreign suspects.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | October 11, 2007
WASHINGTON -- Two Congressional panels yesterday rejected President Bush's request to renew without added restrictions his administration's broad eavesdropping authority, and instead adopted a measure that gives federal judges greater oversight authority over foreign electronic surveillance conducted by the National Security Agency. The bill approved by the House Judiciary and Intelligence committees was along straight party lines, just as they split to defeat the administration's proposal.
NEWS
By KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | December 19, 2005
WASHINGTON -- Key Republicans said yesterday that President Bush will have to explain why he ordered secret eavesdropping on U.S. residents without first obtaining court approval, keeping pressure on the White House after Bush's unapologetic admission that he ordered the surveillance to combat terrorism. Fanning out to different Sunday morning news shows, Republican Sens. Arlen Specter of Pennsylvania, Lindsey Graham of South Carolina and John McCain of Arizona noted that a 1978 law specified that a special federal court must approve any surveillance of U.S. citizens conducted for intelligence purposes on American soil.
NEWS
By Peter Spiegel and Peter Spiegel,LOS ANGELES TIMES | September 19, 2007
WASHINGTON -- The fight over the Bush administration's warrantless wiretapping program began anew yesterday as the nation's top spy urged Congress to make permanent a law that gives intelligence agencies more latitude to monitor overseas phone calls and e-mails. Director of National Intelligence Mike McConnell testified that the administration needs the expanded powers because old versions of the law forced intelligence agents to obtain time-consuming warrants for any communications that passed through U.S. networks - even if the call was between two foreign suspects.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | May 21, 2005
WASHINGTON - A Bush administration proposal would give the FBI broad authority to track the mail of people in terrorism investigations, officials said yesterday, but the Postal Service is raising privacy concerns about the plan. The proposal, to be considered next week in a closed-door meeting of the Senate Intelligence Committee, would allow the FBI to direct postal inspectors to turn over the names, addresses and other material appearing on the outsides of letters sent to or by people connected to foreign intelligence investigations.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | March 1, 2006
WASHINGTON -- Senate Republican leader Bill Frist, stepping into the growing debate in his party about the Bush administration's domestic eavesdropping program, pushed a group of Republican senators yesterday to work out conflicting approaches to legislation to address the program. His efforts reflect the increasing determination of Republican lawmakers to impose some form of oversight on the program, through which the administration has secretly sidestepped the existing legal authorities for years to spy on thousands of domestic communications with suspected terrorists abroad.
NEWS
By Steve Chapman | January 24, 2007
CHICAGO -- Is President Bush surrendering in the war on terror? For more than a year, the administration has insisted that preserving its "terrorist surveillance program," which involves unfettered and unauthorized wiretapping of Americans suspected of communicating with al-Qaida operatives abroad, was, in the words of former White House press secretary Scott McClellan, "a vital tool" for us "to stay a step ahead of a deadly enemy that is determined to...
NEWS
By Siobhan Gorman and Siobhan Gorman,SUN REPORTER | August 6, 2007
President Bush signed a bill yesterday expanding the powers of spy agencies to carry out wiretap activities in the United States without a court warrant. The measure, adopted by Congress in one of its final acts before taking a month off, gives the National Security Agency and other agencies broader authority to monitor phone conversations, e-mail and other private communications that are part of a foreign intelligence investigation. It was approved by Congress with surprising swiftness, amid warnings from the Bush administration about a new gap in the nation's terrorism defenses and criticism from opponents who called it an erosion of the privacy rights of ordinary Americans.
NEWS
By Steve Chapman | January 24, 2007
CHICAGO -- Is President Bush surrendering in the war on terror? For more than a year, the administration has insisted that preserving its "terrorist surveillance program," which involves unfettered and unauthorized wiretapping of Americans suspected of communicating with al-Qaida operatives abroad, was, in the words of former White House press secretary Scott McClellan, "a vital tool" for us "to stay a step ahead of a deadly enemy that is determined to...
NEWS
By GAIL GIBSON and GAIL GIBSON,SUN REPORTER | July 14, 2006
The highly secret spy court that would pass judgment on the National Security Agency's warrantless surveillance program under a deal announced yesterday has issued just one public ruling in its nearly 30-year history and from its inception was never intended to consider the kind of complex constitutional questions at issue in the heated debate over the government's counterterrorism methods. Instead, judges on the nation's most shrouded court sit primarily to rule on government applications to search the homes or monitor the phones and e-mail of terrorism suspects inside the United States - requests that almost always are approved.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | March 1, 2006
WASHINGTON -- Senate Republican leader Bill Frist, stepping into the growing debate in his party about the Bush administration's domestic eavesdropping program, pushed a group of Republican senators yesterday to work out conflicting approaches to legislation to address the program. His efforts reflect the increasing determination of Republican lawmakers to impose some form of oversight on the program, through which the administration has secretly sidestepped the existing legal authorities for years to spy on thousands of domestic communications with suspected terrorists abroad.
NEWS
By LEONARD PITTS JR | January 8, 2006
WASHINGTON -- Another president, perhaps. Maybe then it would be easier to look the other way, give a tacit nod to the abrogation of constitutional freedoms as a wartime necessity. After all, Abraham Lincoln suspended the right of habeas corpus during the Civil War and history does not begrudge him for it, given that he faced an enemy massed almost literally within sight of the White House. But this is not President Lincoln we're talking about. It's not even President Franklin D. Roosevelt, succumbing to post-Pearl Harbor hysteria and interning thousands of Japanese-Americans.
NEWS
By KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | December 19, 2005
WASHINGTON -- Key Republicans said yesterday that President Bush will have to explain why he ordered secret eavesdropping on U.S. residents without first obtaining court approval, keeping pressure on the White House after Bush's unapologetic admission that he ordered the surveillance to combat terrorism. Fanning out to different Sunday morning news shows, Republican Sens. Arlen Specter of Pennsylvania, Lindsey Graham of South Carolina and John McCain of Arizona noted that a 1978 law specified that a special federal court must approve any surveillance of U.S. citizens conducted for intelligence purposes on American soil.
NEWS
By Richard Schmitt and Richard Schmitt,LOS ANGELES TIMES | May 2, 2004
WASHINGTON - Underscoring changes in domestic surveillance allowed under the USA Patriot Act, the Justice Department said in a report released yesterday that it conducted hundreds more secret searches around the United States last year under foreign intelligence surveillance laws. The department said the use of covert search powers, which were enhanced under the Patriot Act, shows how federal investigators have stepped up the war against terrorism in the United States over the past 32 months.
NEWS
By LEONARD PITTS JR | January 8, 2006
WASHINGTON -- Another president, perhaps. Maybe then it would be easier to look the other way, give a tacit nod to the abrogation of constitutional freedoms as a wartime necessity. After all, Abraham Lincoln suspended the right of habeas corpus during the Civil War and history does not begrudge him for it, given that he faced an enemy massed almost literally within sight of the White House. But this is not President Lincoln we're talking about. It's not even President Franklin D. Roosevelt, succumbing to post-Pearl Harbor hysteria and interning thousands of Japanese-Americans.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | May 21, 2005
WASHINGTON - A Bush administration proposal would give the FBI broad authority to track the mail of people in terrorism investigations, officials said yesterday, but the Postal Service is raising privacy concerns about the plan. The proposal, to be considered next week in a closed-door meeting of the Senate Intelligence Committee, would allow the FBI to direct postal inspectors to turn over the names, addresses and other material appearing on the outsides of letters sent to or by people connected to foreign intelligence investigations.
NEWS
May 17, 2004
TAKING ADVANTAGE of the relaxed standard for secret foreign intelligence searches it gained with the USA Patriot Act in 2001, the Justice Department has steamed forward in its use of these surveillance warrants. While it is reassuring that Justice is taking terror investigations seriously, it also is a worry. These warrants are so secret that people who aren't later charged - the vast majority - never know the government was watching them. And people who are charged are never permitted to see the warrant, so they cannot defend themselves in court against unreasonable snooping.
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