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By Robert Hilson Jr. and Robert Hilson Jr.,SUN STAFF | February 15, 1998
Roland H. Shackford, who was a foreign correspondent for Scripps-Howard newspapers and United Press International and a member of the press corps that covered President Richard M. Nixon's trip to China in 1972, died of pneumonia Feb. 6 at his Cockeysville home.Mr. Shackford, 89, had a journalism career that spanned nearly 40 years. He lived overseas for many years and traveled extensively.In addition to Nixon's historic trip to China, Mr. Shackford covered such major events as the Berlin blockade, post-World War II diplomatic conferences, the creation of NATO and the Marshall Plan to rebuild Europe, and the birth of the United Nations.
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NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | January 20, 2013
A memorial service for Richard Ben Cramer, 62, a former Baltimore Sun reporter, Pulitzer Prize-winning foreign correspondent and acclaimed biographer who died Jan. 7, will be held at 2 p.m. Sunday at Washington College's Gibson Center for the Arts in Chestertown. Gov. Martin O'Malley said Sunday he planned to attend the service, and had also ordered the State House flag in Annapolis to be flown at half mast. The governor called Mr. Cramer "a great American, great Marylander and a dear friend," and said in a statement that, “Richard's work as a gifted writer and deeply principled journalist made our republic a better place; made us a stronger, more compassionate, and more understanding people.
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NEWS
By Zofia Smardz | May 5, 1991
THE SOCCER WAR.Ryszard Kapuscinski.Knopf.240 pages. $21.There is a type of foreign correspondent known in thbusiness as a "cowboy" -- one addicted to the dangerous assignment, drawn to the front lines of war, enraptured by the perilous locale, never hesitating to throw himself into the line of fire in pursuit of a story. Peter Arnett, holed up in Baghdad LTC during the gulf war, is the most readily accessible example of this turbocharged breed. But the unlikely prototype may well be Ryszard Kapuscinski, whose quasi-memoir, "The Soccer War," could be a blueprint for nosing out adventure and mayhem on the overseas beat.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, Baltimore Sun | January 9, 2013
Richard Ben Cramer, a former Baltimore Sun reporter who later became a Pulitzer Prize-winning foreign correspondent for The Philadelphia Inquirer and an acclaimed author chronicling the lives of politicians and legendary sports figures, died Monday of lung cancer at Johns Hopkins Hospital. Mr. Cramer, who was 62, lived in Chestertown. "Richard's work as a gifted writer and deeply principled journalist made our Republic a better place; made us a stronger, more compassionate, and more understanding people," Gov. Martin J. O'Malley, a friend, said in a statement released Tuesday.
TOPIC
By G. Jefferson Price III and G. Jefferson Price III,PERSPECTIVE EDITOR | November 25, 2001
FRIENDS HAVE ASKED in the last couple of months if I didn't wish I were still foreign editor of this newspaper, a job I held for 10 years until the end of last August. The answer's no. Others have asked if I didn't wish I were still a foreign correspondent during this most important conflict since the Vietnam War. Emphatically not. In my 10 years as foreign editor, the Soviet Union collapsed, the Balkans disintegrated in a blood bath unprecedented in Europe since World War II, the United States kept bombing the bejabbers out of Iraq, half a million people were massacred in Rwanda, Zaire renamed itself Congo in a blood-soaked revolution, NATO went to war against what was left of Yugoslavia, the Israeli-Arab conflict seethed on and on and on. Foreign editors have to tell correspondents to go to the places where this sort of thing is happening.
NEWS
By Richard O'Mara | September 20, 2005
We are deep into the season of spiders. They are everywhere outside the house; inside, too, where they keep out of sight. Every fall they appear in places where they weren't in summer, when there were more people around - in the tool shed, the outdoor shower, even over beach bicycles left out overnight. They are the most nimble of creatures, as you can see when they scramble over their webs. Mara is a former foreign correspondent and editor at The Sun.
NEWS
September 29, 1990
Angelo Natale, 64, editorial supervisor at the World Service and Foreign desks of the Associated Press and a former AP foreign correspondent in the Middle East and Soviet Union, died in New York Wednesday. He joined the AP in 1942. In November 1956, at the height of the Suez Canal crisis, he entered AP's foreign service in Cairo, Egypt. He was transferred to the wire service's bureau in Moscow in 1958. He was promoted to editorial supervisor in 1973 at the New York desk responsible for transmitting AP news reports to 8,500 subscribers in 105 countries.
NEWS
March 29, 1995
Hanns-Joachim Friedrichs, 68, a foreign correspondent and television anchorman whose lively reports helped transform German television news, died of cancer yesterday in Hamburg. He anchored ARD's late-evening news program, "Tagesthemen," from 1985 to 1991, helping to transform German television news from the static reading of scripts to an American-style format, featuring live correspondent reports and a more engaged news presentation. For 20 years, he was a foreign correspondent for ZDF, the other leading German public television network, including two long stints in the United States and covering Vietnam from 1972 to 1973.
NEWS
By Annapolis Bureau of The Sun | January 16, 1991
ABORTIONLatest Senate bill's restrictions faultedAnother abortion bill, this one sponsored by Senate leaders and supported by Senate President Thomas V. Mike Miller Jr., D-Prince George's, was introduced yesterday -- and was immediately denounced by abortion-rights groups.Introduced by Senate Majority Leader Clarence W. Blount,D-Baltimore; Deputy Majority Leader John A. Pica Jr., D-Baltimore, and Sen. Walter M. Baker, D-Cecil, the chairman of the Judicial Proceedings panel, the bill would allow abortion until the time the fetus might be capable of surviving outside the womb.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | January 20, 2013
A memorial service for Richard Ben Cramer, 62, a former Baltimore Sun reporter, Pulitzer Prize-winning foreign correspondent and acclaimed biographer who died Jan. 7, will be held at 2 p.m. Sunday at Washington College's Gibson Center for the Arts in Chestertown. Gov. Martin O'Malley said Sunday he planned to attend the service, and had also ordered the State House flag in Annapolis to be flown at half mast. The governor called Mr. Cramer "a great American, great Marylander and a dear friend," and said in a statement that, “Richard's work as a gifted writer and deeply principled journalist made our republic a better place; made us a stronger, more compassionate, and more understanding people.
EXPLORE
By Louise Vest | February 25, 2012
100 Years Ago Gowns and frowns In the "In Vogue" column of the Times : "Skirts, especially on lingerie dresses are showing more fullness. Double veilings are being used to give lovely iridescent effects. Velour hats are proving strong favorites. The vogue for black and white alliances shows but little abatement. The jumper design has been furiously revived for dressy shirtwaists. Collarettes of black or white tulle are used to wear with afternoon gowns.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | December 4, 2011
Anthony O'Neill "Tony" Miller, a retired reporter and foreign correspondent, died Nov. 23 of prostate cancer at his home in Cuernavaca, Mexico. The former Ellicott City resident was 68. Born in Baltimore and raised in Catonsville, Mr. Miller was a 1961 graduate of Loyola High School and earned a bachelor's degree in political science in 1965 from what is now Loyola University Maryland. After working as a social worker for the city Department of Social Services and studying psychology, Mr. Miller left Baltimore in the early 1970s and went to California, where he began reporting for the San Jose Mercury and later the Sacramento Bee. He became the primary researcher for authors George Klineman, Sherman Butler and David Conn, whose book, "The Cult That Died: The Tragedy of Jim Jones and the People's Temple," published in 1990, told the story of the 1978 Jonestown Massacre in Guyana.
NEWS
By Richard O'Mara | September 20, 2005
We are deep into the season of spiders. They are everywhere outside the house; inside, too, where they keep out of sight. Every fall they appear in places where they weren't in summer, when there were more people around - in the tool shed, the outdoor shower, even over beach bicycles left out overnight. They are the most nimble of creatures, as you can see when they scramble over their webs. Mara is a former foreign correspondent and editor at The Sun.
FEATURES
By David Folkenflik and David Folkenflik,SUN STAFF | March 20, 2004
News executives at once applauded and winced yesterday after seeing USA Today's detailed account of the dishonest reporting - including repeated instances of plagiarism and fabrication - by former foreign correspondent Jack Kelley. They applauded, they said, because such honesty is desperately needed to win back the trust of the public. But the scandal undoubtedly will reinforce the mistrust many Americans already feel toward the media, they added. "It's definitely one more troubling scene in a long-running movie," said Sandra Mims Rowe, editor of the Portland Oregonian.
TOPIC
By G. Jefferson Price III and G. Jefferson Price III,PERSPECTIVE EDITOR | January 11, 2004
THIRTY-FIVE years ago, when I began my career at this newspaper, the top executive in the newsroom, was about 20 years older than I. He was a gentleman named Paul A. Banker. Last week, somewhat unexpectedly, the fourth in the line of Banker's successors arrived in Baltimore. His name is Tim Franklin, and he replaced Bill Marimow as editor of The Sun. Franklin is about 20 years younger than I am. Time has passed me by. In all these years, no one in a position of authority has asked if I would like to run the place.
TOPIC
By G. Jefferson Price III and G. Jefferson Price III,PERSPECTIVE EDITOR | May 18, 2003
Mayor Martin O'Malley called Wednesday's Flower Mart a rite of passage, which it is in many ways, though I do not know precisely what passage the mayor had in mind. As a rite of passage for the event itself, it is significant that the annual flower display with food and entertainment has survived all these years since it made its debut 92 years ago, despite some interruptions. As a rite of passage in time, if not in genuine progress, it is significant, too. The article describing the Flower Mart noted that crab cakes and, of course, those lemons with little peppermint sticks still were being sold, just as they were almost a century ago when the Women's Civic League opened the first Flower Mart.
NEWS
June 9, 2000
Faygele benMiriam, 55, a cross-dressing civil service worker who won a Supreme Court ruling in a gay rights case, died Monday in Seattle of lung cancer. He helped found the city's Gay Community Social Services in 1971 and produced the gay country music album "Lavendar Country." In 1971, he and his partner at the time became the first couple to apply for a same-sex marriage license. Mr. BenMiriam lost that case and, the next year, was fired from his job as a clerk-typist at the U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission, largely because he was gay and wore capes and dresses to work.
NEWS
By Hal Piper and Hal Piper,SUN STAFF | September 8, 1996
These should be the best of times for that legendary, trench-coated figure, the foreign correspondent. A sparrow cannot fall anywhere in the world, such is the miracle of modern communications, but the tragedy will be on tomorrow's front page - or, to give television its due, on the airwaves tonight - complete with interviews of the sparrow's widow and orphans.Reporting is, in the great buzzword of the day, interactive. A black political figure dares journalists to find proof of slavery in Sudan.
TOPIC
By G. Jefferson Price III and G. Jefferson Price III,PERSPECTIVE EDITOR | November 25, 2001
FRIENDS HAVE ASKED in the last couple of months if I didn't wish I were still foreign editor of this newspaper, a job I held for 10 years until the end of last August. The answer's no. Others have asked if I didn't wish I were still a foreign correspondent during this most important conflict since the Vietnam War. Emphatically not. In my 10 years as foreign editor, the Soviet Union collapsed, the Balkans disintegrated in a blood bath unprecedented in Europe since World War II, the United States kept bombing the bejabbers out of Iraq, half a million people were massacred in Rwanda, Zaire renamed itself Congo in a blood-soaked revolution, NATO went to war against what was left of Yugoslavia, the Israeli-Arab conflict seethed on and on and on. Foreign editors have to tell correspondents to go to the places where this sort of thing is happening.
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