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By LARRY CARSON and LARRY CARSON,SUN REPORTER | October 19, 2005
Learning how to live in Howard County can be confusing for immigrants and those raised in other cultures, according to a study due for release today that also finds that native-born Americans often are confused as well when they encounter people from foreign cultures. "The report makes an important distinction between integration and accepting cultural diversity," said Roy Appletree, director of Columbia's private, nonprofit FIRN, formerly the Foreign-born Information and Referral Network, which was the lead agency for the report.
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NEWS
January 11, 2012
Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake's inauguration speech last year laid out an ambitious goal of growing the city's population by 10,000 families over the next decade. Where are those approximately 22,000 new residents to come from? Clearly, the mayor hopes some suburban residents can be lured back by the attractions of city life. Others could be people from out of state who are moving to Maryland for the first time. But if the experience of other cities is any guide, it seems almost certain that a substantial proportion of potential new Baltimore residents - as much 40 percent - will be immigrants.
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NEWS
By Steve Kilar, The Baltimore Sun | January 7, 2012
What comes to mind when Mexican immigrant Elsa Garcia thinks of Baltimore's drawbacks? "Basura. O las drogas," said the East Baltimore resident. "Trash. Or drugs. " Then, quickly, comes her list of Baltimore's pluses: Her husband has been able to find construction work. They have affordable housing. Police are not automatically suspicious of immigrants. By and large, Garcia's perception of Baltimore is positive. It's the kind of opinion Baltimore must foster among immigrants, experts say, if the city is to turn around six decades of population decline.
NEWS
By Steve Kilar, The Baltimore Sun | January 7, 2012
What comes to mind when Mexican immigrant Elsa Garcia thinks of Baltimore's drawbacks? "Basura. O las drogas," said the East Baltimore resident. "Trash. Or drugs. " Then, quickly, comes her list of Baltimore's pluses: Her husband has been able to find construction work. They have affordable housing. Police are not automatically suspicious of immigrants. By and large, Garcia's perception of Baltimore is positive. It's the kind of opinion Baltimore must foster among immigrants, experts say, if the city is to turn around six decades of population decline.
NEWS
By Jeff Seidel and Jeff Seidel,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | May 30, 2004
American youth soccer coaches once took as gospel the word of foreign-born coaches, whom they thought "naturally" knew more about the game because of its popularity in England, Spain, Brazil - wherever. But many in the United States now wonder whether that is still a valid belief. American national men's and women's teams, fed by growth in the youth game for more than 30 years, have become highly competitive internationally. Increasingly, American players are being recruited by European pro clubs.
SPORTS
By Joe Christensen and Joe Christensen,SUN STAFF | August 17, 2003
Watching an Orioles game these days is like catching a scene from the Festival of Nations. The pitcher is from Mexico -- or maybe it's Venezuela, Australia or Aruba -- and he leans in for the sign from the American catcher. The ball gets hit toward the outfield, where the budding young talent from Puerto Rico waves off his American teammate to make the catch. They celebrate the out by throwing the ball around the horn, with the two veterans from the Dominican Republic on the left side of the infield touching the ball last.
NEWS
By Larry Carson and Larry Carson,SUN STAFF | November 27, 2000
It's hard to find out what is hurting someone who doesn't speak your language. It's even harder if, in that person's culture, he or she isn't supposed to talk about it. To help solve these problems among Howard County's growing group of poor immigrants, the Horizon Foundation is awarding a $291,621 grant to the Foreign-born Information and Referral Network. In addition, the foundation is awarding $52,000 to the Association of Community Services, an umbrella group of Howard nonprofit organizations.
NEWS
By Eric Siegel and Eric Siegel,SUN STAFF | November 10, 2002
Baltimore leaders need to encourage at least three times as many foreign-born people to move here if they hope to reverse the city's population decline, according to a new report that calls for improved job and housing opportunities for immigrants. The report, by the Bethesda-based Morrison Public Affairs Group, advises that Baltimore must increase the net number of foreign-born residents it attracts by "three- to four-fold" from the average of 2,000 a year it drew during the 1990s, when the city lost nearly 85,000 people.
FEATURES
By Peter Jensen and Peter Jensen,SUN STAFF | April 26, 1998
Gus smiles so much his family wonders why his cheeks aren't sore. And nothing makes him happier than reading - except maybe spotting a truck full of new cars - a sight that will cause him to squeal in delight.Spend time with this loveable 21-month-old Guatemalan native, and you can understand the anger his parents felt the day the federal government decided he didn't merit the medical tests doctors considered vital."It was just such an outrage," said Fran Bloksberg-Fireovid of Riderwood, his mother.
NEWS
February 22, 2006
FIRN seeking award nominations Nominations are being sought for the American Success Award sponsored by FIRN, the Foreign-born Information and Referral Network, in partnership with Howard County government, Howard County Economic Development Authority, and the Howard County Chamber of Commerce. The awards, which celebrate the achievements of Howard County's foreign-born business community, will be presented at a dinner May 10 at Ten Oaks Ballroom in Clarksville. Recipients must be foreign-born and their businesses must be in Howard County.
NEWS
By Liz Bowie, The Baltimore Sun | April 27, 2011
With a passion for constitutional questions that bubbles just below the surface, a group of mostly foreign-born students from Randallstown High School beat out teams from schools in Montgomery, Washington and Charles counties for a chance to represent Maryland at a national social studies contest. Perhaps it is because they come mostly from Nigeria, Liberia, Grenada and Egypt, countries that have all seen political turmoil, that these students, with the help of their teacher, have turned the new experiences of living in a democracy into a quest to win the We the People: The Citizen and the Constitution National Finals to be held in Washington this weekend.
NEWS
By Joe Burris, The Baltimore Sun | April 14, 2011
During the 11 years she has lived in Howard County, former Centennial Lane Elementary School Principal Florence Hu has seen the school district become a magnet for overseas families looking to move to the U.S. — so much so, that she has received email inquiries about the system from parents who live as far away as South Korea. But even parents who come armed with specific information about schools discover stark differences between the American approach to education and that of their own country, she says.
NEWS
By Dan Rodricks | August 17, 2010
While Republicans beat the drums of demagoguery with an attack on birthright citizenship designed to stoke anti-immigrant fervor in an election year, I'd like to suggest they shift focus back to another part of the Constitution that really needs to go: the requirement that the president be born in the United States. You can Google it, my fellow Americans: Article II, Section 1, Clause 5 says you can't run for the White House unless you were born here. Seven years ago, Orrin Hatch, the sartorially splendid Republican senator of Utah, proposed an amendment to allow foreign-born Americans who have been citizens for at least two decades to run for president.
SPORTS
By Grahame L. Jones and Kevin Baxter, Tribune newspapers | July 6, 2010
CAPE TOWN, South Africa — Former German great Franz Beckenbauer on Monday said one reason this year's World Cup team has played so well is because it has benefited from a blend of players from different cultures. Eleven of Germany's 23 players would have been eligible to play for other countries, including Polish-born forwards Miroslav Klose and Lukas Podolski and 21-year-old Turkish playmaker Mesut Ozil . "There are players that are not born in the country but of course they have German passports and maybe that's another reason the German team is playing so well," Beckenbauer, who won World Cups as both a player and coach for Germany, told the Associated Press.
NEWS
By Diana Nguyen and Diana Nguyen,Capital News Service | January 24, 2010
WASHINGTON - -The Maryland Hispanic population has increased by at least 65 percent since the 2000 census, contributing to increasing ethnic diversity nationally, according to a new U.S. Census Bureau report. There are 375,830 Hispanics living in Maryland as of 2007, an increase from 227,916 in 2000, according to Census Bureau data analyzed by the Maryland Department of Planning and released last week. After Hispanics, Asian immigration ranks second with a 29 percent increase. The Census Bureau American Community Survey reported that the huge increase in immigration from Latin America and Asia over the last 40 years "has been the major force changing the racial and ethnic composition of the American population."
NEWS
By Larry Carson and Larry Carson,Sun reporter | August 8, 2007
Jennifer L. Blake of River Hill, a self-employed community development consultant, starts tomorrow as the new executive director of FIRN Inc., the Columbia-based nonprofit devoted to helping the foreign born. Blake, 53, a Howard County resident since 1994, replaces Roy Appletree, FIRN's director since 2003, who announced his decision to leave six months ago. "I'm transitioning - taking a sabbatical - said Appletree, 60. "I just felt it was time to move on." The change comes as the number of foreign-born residents in Howard County is growing.
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