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NEWS
August 10, 2011
As a retired veteran, I was saddened to read of the helicopter crash in Afghanistan that killed more than two dozen U.S. special forces troops Saturday. The Taliban claim responsibility for the catastrophe, but the U.S. and United Nations must share part of the blame for allowing Afghan warlords and drug dealers to operate freely in the area, in many cases financed by U.S. aid dollars. Our own government is assisting our adversaries, which makes no sense at all. President Obama and his military commanders need to explain just what our military is accomplishing in Afghanistan and why we continue to give that country large amounts of U.S foreign aid. This is no way to fight a war. Quinton D. Thompson, Towson
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EXPLORE
August 9, 2011
Common sense tells us all that we can't spend more than we bring in - as individuals, as a people, or as a government. Sooner or later, debt will have to be paid in full, or our country will simply collapse as a nation. It's that simple.  Is it doable in the near future? My answer is yes. The first thing we must do is to end all our bogus overseas wars, and bring all the troops home, stationing them, instead, on the Mexican border to finally secure that for good.
NEWS
August 3, 2011
In response to the recent letter regarding foreign assistance to Armenia ("Cut foreign aid to Armenia and other countries that work against United States," July 31), the proposition to reduce assistance to Armenia and other states whose domestic and foreign policy agendas do not closely align with those of the U.S. is a complex topic worthy of further debate. While the U.S. is currently facing a challenging fiscal scenario, reducing foreign assistance to the states in question will only serve to further strain strategic relationships that require delicate handling.
NEWS
July 31, 2011
I am an American who is concerned about our debt and excessive spending, such as on foreign aid to nations that work against us and kill our soldiers. Since the Senate and House Appropriations committees are considering the FY2012 foreign aid bill, with the House Appropriations Committee set to vote on the bill on August 3, I would like to re-state my views on this as I did a few months ago when the FY2012 appropriations process just started. We need to reduce spending by all means possible, especially to places that work against U.S., such as Armenia.
NEWS
By Michael Buckler | April 21, 2011
As Congress redoubles its efforts to cut expenditures from the federal budget, many worthy programs face the chopping block. Austerity means fewer federal highway projects, after-school programs and Social Security cost-of-living increases. Yet, some measures are more painful than others. Government programs providing overseas assistance can surely be cut or trimmed without feeling the sting at home. It's a win-win for politicians and taxpayers, right? Not really. Overseas assistance in the federal budget is actually American assistance in disguise.
NEWS
By Thomas F. Schaller | December 27, 2010
The holiday season is a time for giving and giving thanks. We share presents and good will among our friends and family. Heaven-bound prayers are offered for blessings both past and future. These sentiments are typically conveyed on an individual, family or community level. But as a nation, are we Americans a generous and grateful people? This is a tricky question to answer — and one for which that those who view us from afar might provide different answers than we might for ourselves.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | May 28, 2008
BANGKOK, Thailand - Foreign aid workers have begun reaching remote areas of Myanmar hardest hit by the May 2-3 cyclone, relief agencies said yesterday. These first admissions of foreign workers, issued over the past two days, breach the barrier erected by the government that had delayed delivery of supplies to more than a million people in the remote Irrawaddy River delta. The opening comes more than three weeks after the cyclone, which left 135,000 people dead or missing. The United Nations estimates that 1.5 million survivors deep in the Irrawaddy delta have not yet received any aid. The permissions follow an agreement announced Friday by Ban Ki Moon, the U.N. secretary-general, after a meeting in Myanmar with the leader of that nation's junta, Senior General Than Shwe.
NEWS
By Gregory Clark | August 6, 2007
About 160 million people with incomes a fifth or less than the average U.S. income live less than 1,500 miles from our southern border. Given this huge income gap, more border agents and more miles of fence cannot prevent substantial illegal migration. But such migration is actually the United States' most effective foreign aid program, helping some of the poorest people in the world. Some believe such migration should be tolerated, not fought to the death. A look at history suggests that even as illegal migration ebbs and flows, it will remain a problem for the United States.
NEWS
By WHITNEY KASSEL | January 30, 2006
KIEV, UKRAINE -- That four British diplomats allegedly were passing information from the British embassy in Moscow to MI6 headquarters in London is unrelated to the financial aid that their country gives to Russian non-governmental organizations. President Vladimir I. Putin is manipulating the recent revelation and galvanizing latent xenophobia in Russia to garner support against foreign technical assistance and aid, both of which he perceives as a threat to his power. It appears that the diplomats were using a device planted in a fake rock in a Moscow park to transmit the information.
NEWS
September 7, 2005
THE OFFERS of disaster assistance coming from rich countries such as Japan, France and Germany are not surprising given the huge relief effort taking place in New Orleans and the breadth of the death and destruction left in Hurricane Katrina's wake. What is surprising, and somewhat hurtful to America's national pride and can-do culture, are the offers of help from poor countries usually on the receiving end of U.S. aid. The Dominican Republic, Romania, Bangladesh, Bosnia, Belarus, El Salvador, even Honduras, one of the poorest countries in the Western Hemisphere, and others have offered modest assistance.
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