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NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | February 22, 2004
WASHINGTON - With countries from Bolivia to Bangladesh competing for a rich new flow of foreign aid from the United States, the Bush administration and Congress are moving ahead with a fundamental overhaul of programs to assist developing nations. The new approach - an experiment intended to create competition among applicants, who must demonstrate their worthiness to receive financing - has won support in Congress. But it has already drawn criticism from those who say that some recipients of aid under existing programs may be shortchanged.
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NEWS
By Mark Matthews and Mark Matthews,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | March 21, 2002
WASHINGTON - President Bush leaves today for an international development conference in Mexico, carrying the message that the United States is not a tightwad when it comes to fighting world poverty, but that rich and poor countries alike need to get smarter about how they dole out and use foreign aid. Since Bush launched the war on terrorism last year, critics abroad and at home have said that the U.S. response to the Sept. 11 attacks places too much emphasis on military force and too little on dealing with "root causes," such as poverty and powerlessness, of the hatred that nurtures terrorism.
NEWS
By Barbara Demick and Barbara Demick,LOS ANGELES TIMES | September 30, 2004
SEOUL, South Korea - In a disturbing sign that North Korea is further closing its doors to the outside world, the reclusive regime is trying to reduce the presence of foreign aid agencies in the country, diplomats and aid officials said. Although not rejecting humanitarian aid entirely, the North Korean government has told the United Nations that it wants to discontinue an annual fund-raising appeal that started in 1995 at the height of a famine that killed an estimated 2 million people.
NEWS
January 24, 2001
THE CAUSES of family planning, women's health and combating AIDS in poor parts of the world are curtailed by President Bush's first executive order in the foreign aid field. Mr. Bush reinstated the "Mexico City policy" of President Reagan, so named because it was announced at a population conference in that city in 1984. The policy denies family planning aid to nongovernment organizations that also do abortion counseling, perform the procedure or advocate laws to permit it. The policy was maintained by President George H. W. Bush but was ended by President Clinton upon taking office.
NEWS
By Patrick W. Quirk | January 6, 2014
The United States is developing its second Quadrennial Diplomacy and Development Review (QDDR) - a broad assessment of the State Department and United States Agency for International Development (USAID) and their effectiveness in furthering the country's foreign-policy objectives amid a changing world of rising powers. The first QDDR, completed in 2010, outlined an expansive framework for augmenting and leveraging U.S. "civilian power" to advance core American interests in a changing world of new threats and rising powers.
NEWS
By Bob Deans and Bob Deans,Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development. (Note: Figures do not include Peace Corps programs; international narcotics control assistance or aid to former Soviet states. Adding those would raise U.S. aid in 1995 to $11.29 billion, or 0.16 percent of GNP, according to the U.S. Agency for International Development.) Pub Date: 5/26/97COX NEWS SERVICE | May 26, 1997
WASHINGTON -- Fifty years after Americans helped rebuild a war-torn Europe with the most successful foreign assistance program in history, the United States has become the most tight-fisted aid donor in the industrialized world. It's dead last among modern nations in the portion of its wealth that goes to help poor countries.Italy is more generous; so is Spain. Canada gives nearly four times as great a share of its economic output to developing countries as the United States doles out, and tiny Denmark gives 10 times as much.
NEWS
October 11, 2011
It's hard to imagine why we continue to give away billions in foreign aid when America is sinking further into debt and problems at home are rising at an alarming rate. Unemployment is sky high, food stamps are at a record high, home foreclosures/evictions are rising and our infrastructure is crumbling. Our schools are dilapidated, jobs continue to go overseas, many pension funds have gone be the wayside and citizens are going without health care or cutting back on prescriptions.
NEWS
July 21, 1992
Firewalls may well be the hottest issue in Washingtotn during this four-week congressional session between political conventions. The term applies to a provision in the 1990 budget agreement between the Bush White House and the Democratic-controlled Congress that forbids using savings in defense or foreign aid to fund domestic programs. Instead, the money supposedly is to be used to reduce the deficit.We say supposedly because the Democratic leadership has been hellbent all year on breaking down these firewalls and thereby making hash out of efforts to bring the federal budget under control.
NEWS
August 3, 1992
What counts as a catastrophe? A plane crash? A hurricane? A savings and loan crisis? How about the quiet deaths, each day, of 40,000 children?Around the world, 250,000 young lives are lost every week -- more than a million a month. Today, 11,000 children will die of diarrheal dehydration -- a condition that can easily be prevented by a package of oral rehydration salts that costs one dime. Meanwhile, 6,000 other children's deaths will be attributed to pneumonia; 4,000 will die from measles, 2,100 from tetanus and 1,400 from whooping cough.
NEWS
By Patrick Basham | July 8, 2005
WASHINGTON - The banner headline in Britain's News of the World read: "5 Billion People Can't Be Wrong!" Well, yes they can. There's no question that the best-selling British Sunday newspaper captured the post-Live 8 media spin. Now that several billion people have watched Live 8, the biggest event in the history of entertainment, the planet is allegedly mobilized to "Make Poverty History." But the conventional wisdom is wrong about public opinion and Live 8's politically fashionable organizers are wrong about the remedy for African poverty.
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