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NEWS
October 23, 2011
The recent Republican presidential candidate debate in Las Vegas put a new spotlight on the issue of U.S. spending on foreign aid, although it may have escaped the notice of many ("Republicans take off gloves in Vegas debate," Oct. 19). Times are tough and Americans need to understand why it is vital that we continue to send development aid overseas: It increases jobs here in the U.S. and keeps our homeland safer. My firm is an international development company that employs American workers (and local partners as well)
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NEWS
By Patrick W. Quirk | January 6, 2014
The United States is developing its second Quadrennial Diplomacy and Development Review (QDDR) - a broad assessment of the State Department and United States Agency for International Development (USAID) and their effectiveness in furthering the country's foreign-policy objectives amid a changing world of rising powers. The first QDDR, completed in 2010, outlined an expansive framework for augmenting and leveraging U.S. "civilian power" to advance core American interests in a changing world of new threats and rising powers.
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NEWS
August 3, 2011
In response to the recent letter regarding foreign assistance to Armenia ("Cut foreign aid to Armenia and other countries that work against United States," July 31), the proposition to reduce assistance to Armenia and other states whose domestic and foreign policy agendas do not closely align with those of the U.S. is a complex topic worthy of further debate. While the U.S. is currently facing a challenging fiscal scenario, reducing foreign assistance to the states in question will only serve to further strain strategic relationships that require delicate handling.
NEWS
By Victor Davis Hanson | December 29, 2013
The gangster state of North Korea became a nuclear power in 2006-2007, despite lots of foreign aid aimed at precluding just such proliferation -- help usually not otherwise accorded such a loony dictatorship. Apparently the civilized world rightly suspected that if nuclear, Pyongyang would either export nuclear material and expertise to other unstable countries, or bully its successful but non-nuclear neighbors -- or both. The United States has given billions of dollars in foreign aid to Pakistan, whose Islamist gangs have spearheaded radical anti-American terrorism.
NEWS
By Michael Buckler | April 21, 2011
As Congress redoubles its efforts to cut expenditures from the federal budget, many worthy programs face the chopping block. Austerity means fewer federal highway projects, after-school programs and Social Security cost-of-living increases. Yet, some measures are more painful than others. Government programs providing overseas assistance can surely be cut or trimmed without feeling the sting at home. It's a win-win for politicians and taxpayers, right? Not really. Overseas assistance in the federal budget is actually American assistance in disguise.
NEWS
By Jeff Danovich | December 5, 2011
Now that the so-called supercommittee has failed in its task to find $1.2 trillion in budget cuts over the next decade, if Congress does not manage to reach a deal before 2013, across-the-board cuts will be implemented. These cuts would hit the military particularly hard. Defense Secretary Leon Panetta says that any additional budget cuts (on top of the several hundred million dollars' worth that were previously scheduled to take place) would "hollow out the military" and leave our country less secure.
NEWS
December 8, 2011
Jeff Danovich's commentary "Foreign aid keeps us safe" (Dec.5) could not be further from the truth. It is wrong to rob middle-class American taxpayers in order to enrich wealthy foreign leaders. In most cases, U.S. foreign aid does more harm than good. Economist Dambisa Moyo, who wrote the New York Times best-selling book "Dead Aid" about why foreign aid programs have failed developing countries, notes that "financial assistance has fostered dependency, encouraged corruption and ultimately perpetuated poverty and poor governance" among its recipients.
NEWS
By Carolyn Woo | January 30, 2013
Like the rest of America, I will be tuning in Sunday to watch Baltimore's own Ravens play for the Vince Lombardi Trophy in Super Bowl XLVII. The Super Bowl has become a great American tradition. But there's another tradition that demonstrates our nation's finest values and doesn't get nearly as much attention - and that's the good we do around the world. You only need to turn on the television briefly or glance at a newspaper to see why our engagement in the world is so critical to our nation's security, economy and standing.
NEWS
July 31, 2011
I am an American who is concerned about our debt and excessive spending, such as on foreign aid to nations that work against us and kill our soldiers. Since the Senate and House Appropriations committees are considering the FY2012 foreign aid bill, with the House Appropriations Committee set to vote on the bill on August 3, I would like to re-state my views on this as I did a few months ago when the FY2012 appropriations process just started. We need to reduce spending by all means possible, especially to places that work against U.S., such as Armenia.
NEWS
April 25, 1994
In an editorial in yesterday's editions, the foreign aid appropriation for the 1993 fiscal year was stated incorrectly. It was $14.7 billion.The Sun regrets the errors.It is time to rewrite the basic foreign aid law of this country. Aid is doled out under a 1961 authorization law reflecting Cold War values and amended with a confusing array of targets and prohibitions, largely obsolete. But that is really a fiction. Foreign aid is actually appropriated without much reference to authorization.
NEWS
November 13, 2013
A recent letter to the editor should force every reader to face the ugly truth that there just is apparently not enough money in our federal budget to ensure that all of our people eat well ( "Food stamps are not enough," Nov 7). Does anyone doubt that if the president or Congress selected any man, woman or child at random off the street and empowered them to trim foreign aid we could easily pick up all money we need to feed our people well in a single afternoon? Let's take care of our own first.
NEWS
Joel Brinkley | October 25, 2013
The Afghan people's most dangerous foe is not the Taliban. It's not Pakistan or al-Qaeda. No, it's their president, Hamid Karzai. U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry flew to Kabul earlier this month and spent more than 24 hours with Mr. Karzai, trying to work out an agreement that would allow a modest contingent of U.S. troops to remain in the country after 2014, to continue protecting Afghans from their enemies. The two men said they came to agreement on several important issues.
NEWS
By Jonah Goldberg | August 8, 2013
They're back! The isolationist poltergeists that forever haunt the Republican Party. Or so we're told. In July, New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie and Sen. Rand Paul of Kentucky had a set-to over American foreign policy. Mr. Christie clumsily denounced "this strain of libertarianism that's going through parties right now and making big headlines I think is a very dangerous thought. " It was clumsy in its garbled syntax but also in its ill-considered shot at "libertarianism. " What he meant to say, I think, was "isolationist," and that is the term a host of commentators on the left and right are using to describe Mr. Paul and his ideas.
NEWS
March 28, 2013
Harriet Tubman certainly deserves recognition, but why are we funding with federal dollars a $21 million monument and visitor center in her honor at a time when we are closing national parks, shutting down FAA control towers and dealing with sequester issues ("A monument to Md. abolitionist," March 26)? Our elected officials seem to have lost contact with reality in pursuing their political ambitions. Gov. Martin O'Malley went off campaigning in South Carolina claiming he cut state spending "big time," all the while supporting the Tubman monument.
NEWS
By Carolyn Woo | January 30, 2013
Like the rest of America, I will be tuning in Sunday to watch Baltimore's own Ravens play for the Vince Lombardi Trophy in Super Bowl XLVII. The Super Bowl has become a great American tradition. But there's another tradition that demonstrates our nation's finest values and doesn't get nearly as much attention - and that's the good we do around the world. You only need to turn on the television briefly or glance at a newspaper to see why our engagement in the world is so critical to our nation's security, economy and standing.
NEWS
By Doyle McManus | October 23, 2012
It's a safe bet that President Barack Obama misses the old Mitt Romney - the one who described himself as "severely conservative. " In their first debate in Denver, Mr. Romney outflanked the president by assuming the role of Moderate Mitt, a sweet-tempered fellow we hadn't met before. He promised he'd never reduce the share of the tax burden paid by wealthy Americans, cut federal education spending or restrict access to contraceptives. Mr. Obama seemed flummoxed that the opponent he'd expected was a no-show.
NEWS
By CARL T. ROWAN | February 3, 1995
Washington. -- Abraham Lincoln used to argue that no good deed was totally unselfish, that if he helped free a pig that had its head stuck in a fence, it was really to be sure that his sleep would not be ruined by the cries of the pig.The real-world proof of Lincoln's argument is the politically brave action by President Clinton to help prevent an economic meltdown in Mexico.Sure, Mexicans will avert suffering and other emerging nations will breathe easier because the president bypassed a bickering U.S. Congress to halt a broadening economic crisis.
NEWS
By Jonah Goldberg | May 8, 2012
"If Mitt Romney can be pushed around, intimidated, coerced, co-opted by a conservative radio talk show host in Middle America, then how is he going to stand up to the Chinese? How is he going to stand up to Putin?" So asked Bryan Fischer, a radio host with the American Family Association, after claiming credit for Richard Grenell's scalp. Mr. Grenell is the openly gay former foreign policy spokesman for the Romney campaign. Before that, he worked for Ambassador John Bolton at the United Nations, easily the most revered diplomatic official among the base of the Republican Party since Jeane Kirkpatrick.
NEWS
April 2, 2012
Commentator Arick Stall is correct in saying that GOP presidential candidate Ron Paul would take on taxes, spending and regulations, and that "we need a president who is not afraid to make the tough decisions necessary to guarantee future prosperity" ("Primed for the primary," March 30). President Obama is a big tax-and-spend welfare queen who has been running $1.5 trillion deficits every year, which is unsustainable. Other than Ron Paul, the Republican presidential contenders are all big-government conservatives whose foreign policy advisors are the same neoconservative hawks who manipulated us into the disastrous war in Iraq, and who now are trying to provoke an even more insane war with Iran.
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