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By GREGORY KANE | October 21, 2001
THE MEETING of the foreheads was scheduled for noon. Donna Jones Stanley, executive director of the Associated Black Charities of Maryland, sat perusing a menu in a booth at the Polo Grill restaurant, a stylish eatery located in the Inn at the Colonnade, which is ensconced across the street from the esteemed and prestigious Johns Hopkins University. About 12:10 p.m., in walked a certain Sun columnist known for several things, most notably the size of his forehead. This would be a meeting of two friends who would engage in a conversation that touched on slavery, feminism, reparations, Africa, race and ethnicity.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By Justin George, The Baltimore Sun | December 13, 2012
Bullets grazed two victims' foreheads in separate Baltimore shootings overnight, while another man was shot in the back and side. City police are investigating the incidents to determine whether they are connected because of shooter descriptions that victims gave to police, Det. Vernon Davis said. The first was reported before 10:30 a.m. Wednesday, when a 23-year-old man walked into Maryland Shock Trauma Center with bullet wounds to his left arm and left forehead, Davis said.
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NEWS
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,Sun reporter | December 2, 2007
Tom Rothman is working the room at Baltimore's Charles Theatre, serving up the inside scoop on the film biz and life as the head of Fox film studio. Garrulous and quick-witted by nature, the Mount Washington native is clearly in his element, expansive before a crowd that's engaged and encouraging. "The art of `exhibition' is gone with the wind," proclaims Rothman, rocking back in his chair and lamenting a Hollywood business model that stresses blockbuster opening weekends over the careful nurturing of worthwhile films.
NEWS
By Gus G. Sentementes and Richard Irwin and Gus G. Sentementes and Richard Irwin,gus.sentementes@baltsun.com and dick.irwin@baltsun.com | December 13, 2008
Four men forced their way into a party in North Baltimore and robbed more than a dozen people late Thursday, city police said. The robbery happened in the 400 block of E. Lake Ave., about three blocks west of York Road, shortly before midnight, police said. The home had been rented to four Towson University students since September, according to the home's owner, John Komsa III. Reached by phone yesterday morning, Komsa said he had not been told about the home invasion at his property.
NEWS
By CHICAGO TRIBUNE | August 10, 2007
It is almost impossible, when reading this guide, not to slap oneself on the forehead in despair that the Army knew so much of the Arabic culture and customs, and of the importance of that knowledge for achieving military success in Iraq, six decades ago - and forgot almost all of those lessons in the intervening years."
FEATURES
By Rob Kasper | January 26, 2000
I THOUGHT I owned every barbecue gizmo a man could want. But then, just in time for Super Bowl burn-offs, Bob Capallo and Richard D. Lynch, two local die-hard grillers, told me about a light you can strap on your forehead. After hearing these two guys testify about the benefits of illuminating your forehead, I ran out to one of those mega hardware stores, Home Depot on Joppa Road, and found the $10 light in the flashlight display. It has changed my night life. It is, as Capallo and Lynch warned me during telephone interviews, a geeky looking get-up.
FEATURES
By New York Times News Service | August 9, 2007
During the next month, thousands of high school and college football teams will get ready for fall by practicing in torrid conditions where heatstroke is a constant danger. That has some trainers and doctors worried about some thermometers that, in their view, sacrifice accuracy for convenience. The devices use infrared light to scan heat radiation in the ear or on the forehead. The infrared thermometers have produced lower readings in athletic settings -- or in lab tests meant to simulate them -- than rectal thermometers or other devices.
NEWS
By JULIE BYKOWICZ | June 13, 2006
A Baltimore man convicted in the execution-style slaying of a man who interrupted an argument was sentenced yesterday in Baltimore Circuit Court to life plus 20 years in prison. Martinez Brown, 26, of the 2300 block of E. Chase St. was convicted in November by a city jury of first-degree murder and using a handgun during a crime of violence. Prosecutors said Brown shot Kelvin Knight, 18, in the forehead and chest Dec. 7, 2003, outside a Chinese takeout restaurant at Montford Avenue and Biddle Street in East Baltimore.
NEWS
By Gus G. Sentementes and Richard Irwin and Gus G. Sentementes and Richard Irwin,gus.sentementes@baltsun.com and dick.irwin@baltsun.com | December 13, 2008
Four men forced their way into a party in North Baltimore and robbed more than a dozen people late Thursday, city police said. The robbery happened in the 400 block of E. Lake Ave., about three blocks west of York Road, shortly before midnight, police said. The home had been rented to four Towson University students since September, according to the home's owner, John Komsa III. Reached by phone yesterday morning, Komsa said he had not been told about the home invasion at his property.
NEWS
By JOHN KEEFAUVER | April 10, 1991
Carmel, California.--Awhile back the need for adding four more numbers to zip codes was questioned by a House subcommittee, and just in time, I say (although apparently nothing came of it). After all, since we are already nailed by numbers to social security, phones, credit cards, driver's licenses, banking accounts, purchase orders and God knows what else, it would seem that the next -- and only -- logical step would be to do away with mere names altogether.Certainly it is no harder to introduce Ms. Smith as Ms. S-5678013-21F-2488-$182.
NEWS
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,Sun reporter | December 2, 2007
Tom Rothman is working the room at Baltimore's Charles Theatre, serving up the inside scoop on the film biz and life as the head of Fox film studio. Garrulous and quick-witted by nature, the Mount Washington native is clearly in his element, expansive before a crowd that's engaged and encouraging. "The art of `exhibition' is gone with the wind," proclaims Rothman, rocking back in his chair and lamenting a Hollywood business model that stresses blockbuster opening weekends over the careful nurturing of worthwhile films.
NEWS
By CHICAGO TRIBUNE | August 10, 2007
It is almost impossible, when reading this guide, not to slap oneself on the forehead in despair that the Army knew so much of the Arabic culture and customs, and of the importance of that knowledge for achieving military success in Iraq, six decades ago - and forgot almost all of those lessons in the intervening years."
FEATURES
By New York Times News Service | August 9, 2007
During the next month, thousands of high school and college football teams will get ready for fall by practicing in torrid conditions where heatstroke is a constant danger. That has some trainers and doctors worried about some thermometers that, in their view, sacrifice accuracy for convenience. The devices use infrared light to scan heat radiation in the ear or on the forehead. The infrared thermometers have produced lower readings in athletic settings -- or in lab tests meant to simulate them -- than rectal thermometers or other devices.
NEWS
By JULIE BYKOWICZ | June 13, 2006
A Baltimore man convicted in the execution-style slaying of a man who interrupted an argument was sentenced yesterday in Baltimore Circuit Court to life plus 20 years in prison. Martinez Brown, 26, of the 2300 block of E. Chase St. was convicted in November by a city jury of first-degree murder and using a handgun during a crime of violence. Prosecutors said Brown shot Kelvin Knight, 18, in the forehead and chest Dec. 7, 2003, outside a Chinese takeout restaurant at Montford Avenue and Biddle Street in East Baltimore.
SPORTS
By Lem Satterfield and Lem Satterfield,SUN STAFF | May 24, 2003
Nick Williams' left shoulder and elbow were bruised. A white headband rested above his slightly swollen right eye, covering a split in his forehead -- the result of a collision -- that he was told will require "six or seven stitches." But Williams said the pain was well worth enduring to produce Calvert Hall's come-from-behind 7-5 victory over St. Mary's last night in the Maryland Interscholastic Athletic Association A Conference final. The senior scored two late goals that lifted his team to the lacrosse title before 4,500 at Minnegan Field at Towson Stadium.
NEWS
By Donna W. Payne and Donna W. Payne,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | March 7, 2003
At Ash Wednesday services this week in Howard County and around the world, worshipers received the sign of the cross marked in ashes on their foreheads and heard their pastors say, "Remember that you are dust and to dust you shall return." Ash Wednesday, for some branches of Christianity, heralds the start of the Lenten season of repentance, reflection and prayer in preparation for Easter. The ashes are a reminder of each person's mortality, say area clergy, and a token of the hope of resurrection and redemption through Jesus Christ that Easter commemorates.
SPORTS
By Lem Satterfield and Lem Satterfield,SUN STAFF | May 24, 2003
Nick Williams' left shoulder and elbow were bruised. A white headband rested above his slightly swollen right eye, covering a split in his forehead -- the result of a collision -- that he was told will require "six or seven stitches." But Williams said the pain was well worth enduring to produce Calvert Hall's come-from-behind 7-5 victory over St. Mary's last night in the Maryland Interscholastic Athletic Association A Conference final. The senior scored two late goals that lifted his team to the lacrosse title before 4,500 at Minnegan Field at Towson Stadium.
NEWS
By George F. Will | June 2, 1998
WASHINGTON -- Barry Goldwater not only represented Arizona politically, but also he reflected it physically. The geometry of his face -- the planes of his strong jaw and high forehead -- replicated the buttes and mesas of the Southwest, and the crow's-feet that crinkled the corners of his eyes seemed made by squinting into sunsets.He was called "the cheerful malcontent." It takes a rare and fine temperament to wed that adjective with that noun. His emotional equipoise was undisturbed by the loss of 44 states as a presidential nominee.
NEWS
By David L. Greene and David L. Greene,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | December 18, 2001
WASHINGTON -- Doctors treated four benign lesions on President Bush's face last week, the White House said yesterday. Aides said the small growths were no threat to the president's health. The lesions were treated with liquid nitrogen Friday afternoon, and the growths are expected to dry up and fall off within days. Two of the lesions, known as actinic keratoses, while not cancerous, can progress into a form of skin cancer if untreated. They are caused by sun exposure. The two other lesions, known as seborrheic keratoses, are not related to sun exposure and are not considered a cancer risk.
NEWS
By GREGORY KANE | October 21, 2001
THE MEETING of the foreheads was scheduled for noon. Donna Jones Stanley, executive director of the Associated Black Charities of Maryland, sat perusing a menu in a booth at the Polo Grill restaurant, a stylish eatery located in the Inn at the Colonnade, which is ensconced across the street from the esteemed and prestigious Johns Hopkins University. About 12:10 p.m., in walked a certain Sun columnist known for several things, most notably the size of his forehead. This would be a meeting of two friends who would engage in a conversation that touched on slavery, feminism, reparations, Africa, race and ethnicity.
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