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By Diane Pucin and Diane Pucin,LOS ANGELES TIMES | July 3, 2004
WIMBLEDON, England - Maria Sharapova had just finished a BBC television interview and thought the camera was switched off. It wasn't, and in a moment her face had changed from animated and smiling to expressionless and bored. Sharapova knows how it works: Smile for the camera. Born in Siberia, the 17-year-old Sharapova is the tennis girl of the new century. Her talent was noticed when she was 6. Soon, there were agents at her door, offering scholarships to U.S. academies and lessons in grooming and modeling.
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By Julie Bykowicz and Julie Bykowicz,julie.bykowicz@baltsun.com | March 25, 2009
The Senate president - a huge history buff - made a startling announcement Tuesday, the eve of the celebration of Maryland's 375th birthday. Thomas V. Mike Miller said the time has come to change the state song. Breaking with his past unfailing support of maintaining "Maryland, My Maryland" the way it is, despite its decidedly pro-Confederate slant, Miller told lawmakers that they should at least change "a couple of stanzas" of the song. The final stanza of James Ryder Randall's 1861 poem, later set to the tune of "O Tannenbaum" and adopted in 1939 as the state song, is particularly inflammatory: "She is not dead, nor deaf, nor dumb - / Huzza!
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By Jennifer Skalka and Jennifer Skalka,Sun reporter | March 3, 2007
Their lives first intersected in segregated 1950s Greensboro, N.C. Jennie M. Forehand attended the all-white Woman's College of the University of North Carolina. Ulysses Currie worked his way through nearby North Carolina Agricultural and Technical State University by cleaning trays in Forehand's school cafeteria for 50 cents an hour, careful as a black man not to make eye contact with the female students. Now they sit two rows apart in the Maryland Senate. And it is Currie, a sharecropper's son who spent his childhood working the tobacco fields of eastern North Carolina, who is perched in the front row as the powerful chairman of the Budget and Taxation Committee and an aspiring Senate president.
NEWS
By Julie Bykowicz and Julie Bykowicz,julie.bykowicz@baltsun.com | March 7, 2009
Sen. Jennie Forehand was attending a conference of Southern lawmakers some years ago when Maryland, My Maryland, the state song, began playing at a ceremony. An impassioned Confederate-era poem set to the tune of O Tannenbaum, the song takes a particularly exclamatory turn at the end: "She is not dead, nor deaf, nor dumb - Huzza! She spurns the Northern scum! She breathes! She burns! She'll come! She'll come! Maryland! My Maryland!" "People were laughing at it," said Forehand, a Montgomery County Democrat, "They were asking, 'What in the world is this all about?
SPORTS
By Tara Finnegan | July 16, 1991
Mike Clark of Baltimore defeated Tim Johnson, 6-2, 6-2, yesterday to advance to the finals of the Maryland State Hardcourt Championships at St. Paul's School.Clark, the top seed, will play No. 2 seed Mike Castrilli today for the championship.Leading 3-1 in the first set, Clark rallied from a 0-40 deficit to break Johnson's serve and extend his lead to 4-1.After losing his serve the next game, Clark played more aggressively and, with the help of forehand winners, broke Johnson's serve, then held serve to clinched the first set, 6-2.Johnson did not hold serve in the first set."
NEWS
By Julie Bykowicz and Julie Bykowicz,julie.bykowicz@baltsun.com | March 7, 2009
Sen. Jennie Forehand was attending a conference of Southern lawmakers some years ago when Maryland, My Maryland, the state song, began playing at a ceremony. An impassioned Confederate-era poem set to the tune of O Tannenbaum, the song takes a particularly exclamatory turn at the end: "She is not dead, nor deaf, nor dumb - Huzza! She spurns the Northern scum! She breathes! She burns! She'll come! She'll come! Maryland! My Maryland!" "People were laughing at it," said Forehand, a Montgomery County Democrat, "They were asking, 'What in the world is this all about?
SPORTS
By Lisa Dillman and Lisa Dillman,LOS ANGELES TIMES | June 4, 2005
PARIS - Rafael Nadal, the freshly minted 19-year-old from Spain, arrived in the interview room at the French Open sporting uncooperative wet hair, the stray locks almost harder to control than his forehand. "Hola," he said. Say hello to the Nadal era. It's a cliche to say an athlete came of age in a particular match, but, well, Nadal did turn 19 yesterday, the day he reached his first Grand Slam final. And the fourth-seeded Nadal took out the No. 1 player, beating Roger Federer of Switzerland, 6-3, 4-6, 6-4, 6-3, in the semifinals, reducing Federer to a flustered player in search of a forehand.
NEWS
By Julie Bykowicz and Julie Bykowicz,julie.bykowicz@baltsun.com | March 25, 2009
The Senate president - a huge history buff - made a startling announcement Tuesday, the eve of the celebration of Maryland's 375th birthday. Thomas V. Mike Miller said the time has come to change the state song. Breaking with his past unfailing support of maintaining "Maryland, My Maryland" the way it is, despite its decidedly pro-Confederate slant, Miller told lawmakers that they should at least change "a couple of stanzas" of the song. The final stanza of James Ryder Randall's 1861 poem, later set to the tune of "O Tannenbaum" and adopted in 1939 as the state song, is particularly inflammatory: "She is not dead, nor deaf, nor dumb - / Huzza!
SPORTS
By Wayne Coffey and Wayne Coffey,New York Daily News | August 29, 1995
NEW YORK -- More than two hours after Monica Seles had vacated the premises, Stadium Court was four-fifths empty, the U.S. Open was nearing Day 2 and Goran Ivanisevic was writhing on the green court, his ankle throbbing, another Grand Slam debacle about to happen.Ivanisevic would get up. He would continue for a few gritty games. He would leave to a heartfelt ovation. The good news ended there."He was killing me at that stage," said Brett Steven. "It was really bad luck for him."Bad luck, indeed.
NEWS
By Sarah Koenig and Sarah Koenig,SUN STAFF | April 3, 2002
For the first time, Maryland judges may soon be able not only to declare a couple divorced, but to marry them as well. The General Assembly gave final approval yesterday to a bill authorizing judges to unite people in matrimony. Under current state law, only a religious official, Circuit Court clerk or deputy clerk can perform weddings. That has meant that people who want a romantic civil ceremony often dress up in flouncy wedding finery only to unceremoniously wait their turn outside a court clerk's office.
SPORTS
By Sandra McKee and Sandra McKee,Sun reporter | August 22, 2007
Usually, broadcaster and Hall-of-Fame tennis player Pam Shriver is running around like crazy during the U.S. Open in New York, trying to nail down participants for her annual charity match in Baltimore later in the year. But not this year. Shriver has already completed her guest list, which features world No. 5 singles player Andy Roddick and the world No. 1 doubles team of Bob and Mike Bryan. "It's fun the way it has all fallen into place," Shriver said from Los Angeles International Airport as she prepared to head east to Connecticut for this weekend's final tournament before next week's U.S. Open.
NEWS
By Kelly Brewington and Kelly Brewington,SUN REPORTER | April 4, 2007
A House of Delegates committee will take up a bill today that would bar lawmakers from knowingly doling out scholarships to their relatives or the family members of colleagues. But even if the General Assembly approves the changes, critics say, the measure will do little to curb a practice that they say amounts to political patronage. The legislature's scholarship program has long been debated in Annapolis, with some lawmakers pushing to abandon what they call an antiquated system that invites cronyism, perceived or real.
NEWS
By Jennifer Skalka and Jennifer Skalka,Sun reporter | March 3, 2007
Their lives first intersected in segregated 1950s Greensboro, N.C. Jennie M. Forehand attended the all-white Woman's College of the University of North Carolina. Ulysses Currie worked his way through nearby North Carolina Agricultural and Technical State University by cleaning trays in Forehand's school cafeteria for 50 cents an hour, careful as a black man not to make eye contact with the female students. Now they sit two rows apart in the Maryland Senate. And it is Currie, a sharecropper's son who spent his childhood working the tobacco fields of eastern North Carolina, who is perched in the front row as the powerful chairman of the Budget and Taxation Committee and an aspiring Senate president.
SPORTS
By Bill Dwyre and Bill Dwyre,Los Angeles Times | September 4, 2006
NEW YORK -- For 21 years at the U.S. Open, he had left them cheering. Yesterday, Andre Agassi left them crying. Standing and crying, no less. The inevitable had happened. At age 36, he was playing in his last pro tennis tournament. He had won here twice during a career that made him rich, famous and, in the latter years, a sort of legendary ambassador of good sport and good will. He came here with a disc injury in his back that would have most grown men crying for their mommies. Despite that, he had won first- and second-round thrillers, both long and physically taxing matches.
SPORTS
By Charles Bricker and Charles Bricker,SOUTH FLORIDA SUN-SENTINEL | August 29, 2005
NEW YORK - "Vamos, chico!" Another winning forehand crashed off the racket of Rafael Nadal and he was screaming to himself over the applause. Then, as he often does, he clenched his fist as if it was wrapped around a 50-pound dumbbell, his bicep expanding to the size of a softball. "His biceps are bigger than my head," cracked fellow pro Andy Roddick a few days ago as he contemplated the rapid rise of the most photographed man in tennis. The game has known some oversized teenagers, but none who combined such a supreme gift for the game and an imposing physical presence as the 19-year-old prodigy from Mallorca, who has risen in one astonishing season to No. 2 in the world.
SPORTS
By Charles Bricker and Charles Bricker,SOUTH FLORIDA SUN-SENTINEL | June 30, 2005
WIMBLEDON, England - The rising young Frenchman. The unknown Czech. The veteran German. The former French Open champion from Spain with the quick feet. And then, yesterday, the wild-swinging Chilean, Fernando Gonzalez, became the fifth player to be sent packing by Roger Federer. Through the first 10 days of Wimbledon, Paul-Henri Mathieu, Ivo Minar, Nicolas Kiefer, Juan Carlos Ferrero and anyone else searching for the smallest crack in Federer's game has been greatly disappointed. Federer has lost one set, a tiebreaker to Kiefer, which he could blame on un-Federer-like consecutive double faults.
NEWS
By Dennis O'Brien and Michael Dresser and Dennis O'Brien and Michael Dresser,SUN STAFF | March 26, 1999
The House of Delegates handed environmentalists a long-sought victory as it approved legislation yesterday requiring vehicle emissions testing for large trucks and buses that burn diesel fuel.The legislation has passed the Senate in nearly identical form, meaning final passage is virtually assured.The bill, sponsored by Baltimore County Democrat Del. Dan K. Morhaim, passed the House 122-10 with no debate.It would subject Maryland's 70,000 diesel trucks and buses weighing more than 10,000 pounds, along with the same class of out-of-state vehicles, to random testing for the amount of soot or black smoke that spews out of their exhaust pipes.
SPORTS
By New York Times News Service | January 31, 1993
MELBOURNE, Australia -- It has become one of the sporting cliches of the 1990s: Monica Seles with warm-up jacket neatly zipped up, clutching a large silver trophy as a horde of photographers jostle for a clear view.The scene was replayed yesterday at Flinders Park, just as it has been replayed before at Roland Garros and Flushing Meadows."I never thought I'd do so well in Grand Slams," said Seles, after beating Steffi Graf, 4-6, 6-3, 6-2, to win her third straight Australian Open.Few have ever done so well so young.
SPORTS
By Lisa Dillman and Lisa Dillman,LOS ANGELES TIMES | June 4, 2005
PARIS - Rafael Nadal, the freshly minted 19-year-old from Spain, arrived in the interview room at the French Open sporting uncooperative wet hair, the stray locks almost harder to control than his forehand. "Hola," he said. Say hello to the Nadal era. It's a cliche to say an athlete came of age in a particular match, but, well, Nadal did turn 19 yesterday, the day he reached his first Grand Slam final. And the fourth-seeded Nadal took out the No. 1 player, beating Roger Federer of Switzerland, 6-3, 4-6, 6-4, 6-3, in the semifinals, reducing Federer to a flustered player in search of a forehand.
NEWS
By David Nitkin and David Nitkin,SUN STAFF | May 10, 2005
THE TENSION THAT frequently infects Maryland's system for electing state lawmakers was on display last week, as a current and a former legislator announced their interest in moving to the state Senate. Sen. John J. Hafer, a veteran Republican from Western Maryland, accused Del. George C. Edwards, the House minority leader, of effectively forcing him into retirement, saying that Edwards told him that the delegate would be running for the seat regardless of whether Hafer willingly vacated it. Former Montgomery County Del. Cheryl C. Kagan, a Democrat, formed an exploratory committee to prepare for a run against longtime Sen. Jennie M. Forehand, also a Democrat.
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