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May 1, 2005
Mary Kelly Michels, a homemaker and community volunteer, died of a stroke Friday at St. Joseph Medical Center. The Timonium resident was 75. Born Mary Kelly in Baltimore and raised on 21st Street, she attended St. Ann's Parochial School and was a 1948 graduate of the Institute of Notre Dame. She earned a bachelor's degree from the College of Notre Dame of Maryland, where she remained active in its continuing studies program, the Renaissance Institute. In 1951 she married Francis X. Gallagher Sr., an attorney who ran successfully for the Maryland House of Delegates in 1958 and was later appointed Peoples' Counsel.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,Sun Theater Critic | April 1, 2007
Politics, passion and populism ignite the stage in the tuneful musical Meet John Doe, making its world premiere at Ford's Theatre in Washington. MEET JOHN DOE / / Through April 29 / / Ford's Theatre, Washington / / 202-347-4833
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TRAVEL
By Michael A. Schuman and Michael A. Schuman,Special to the Sun | April 15, 2001
If he were alive today, John Wilkes Booth would have little trouble recognizing the farmhouse of Dr. Samuel A. Mudd, where he had come seeking help 136 years ago today. The land surrounding the Southern Maryland house looks much as it did when Booth, in pain from a broken leg, knocked on Mudd's door some six hours after the actor fatally shot Abraham Lincoln about 30 miles away at Ford's Theatre in Washington. If you want to see the Mudd house in its natural surroundings, don't wait too long.
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,sun theater critic | October 2, 2006
The State of the Union may not have changed much in the six decades since Howard Lindsay and Russel Crouse wrote their play of that title. But the state of the theater has changed a great deal. Thematically, Lindsay and Crouse's fictitious account of the making of a presidential candidate is barely dated. Backroom politics, special interests, and political and marital infidelity all sound strikingly familiar. But as directed by Kyle Donnelly at Ford's Theatre in Washington, too much of the production, characterizations and plot development feel creaky.
ENTERTAINMENT
By J. Wynn Rousuck | January 1, 2004
`Gershwin Alone' at Ford's Theatre Hershey Felder returns to Ford's Theatre in Washington Tuesday in his one-man show George Gershwin Alone. Felder, a Canadian native, is the sole performer to win the Gershwin family's blessing to depict the late composer, whose extensive works range from such songs as "Embraceable You" and "I Got Rhythm" to the symphonic piece Rhapsody in Blue and the opera Porgy and Bess. As part of his research, Felder culled through Gershwin's personal papers, manuscripts and recordings and also interviewed family members, friends and biographers.
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,sun theater critic | October 2, 2006
The State of the Union may not have changed much in the six decades since Howard Lindsay and Russel Crouse wrote their play of that title. But the state of the theater has changed a great deal. Thematically, Lindsay and Crouse's fictitious account of the making of a presidential candidate is barely dated. Backroom politics, special interests, and political and marital infidelity all sound strikingly familiar. But as directed by Kyle Donnelly at Ford's Theatre in Washington, too much of the production, characterizations and plot development feel creaky.
FEATURES
By J. WYNN ROUSUCK and J. WYNN ROUSUCK,SUN THEATER CRITIC | February 6, 2006
Trying, Joanna McClelland Glass' play about former Attorney General Francis Biddle, isn't a trying experience at all. To the contrary, thanks in large part to the well-modulated performances of James Whitmore as octogenarian Biddle and Karron Graves as his last personal secretary, the production at Ford's Theatre in Washington is a touching examination of the unexpected, intergenerational friendship that developed between two tough-minded individuals....
ENTERTAINMENT
By J. Wynn Rousuck | March 5, 1998
"Kudzu: A Southern Musical," based on Doug Marlette's nationally syndicated comic strip, is making its world premiere at Ford's Theatre in Washington, opening Tuesday.Set in the fictional town of Bypass, U.S.A., "Kudzu" is a romantic comedy created by Marlette, the Pulitzer Prize-winning cartoonist for Newsday, together with Jack Herrick and Bland Simpson, both members of the Red Clay Ramblers, the North Carolina string band that performs the musical's score. The cast is headed by James Ludwig as Kudzu Dubose, a young man who aspires to become a writer and who, along with his friends, uncovers a web of intrigue involving the owner of the town mill.
FEATURES
September 10, 1995
* Arena Stage, 6th Street and Maine Avenue S.W., Washington. (202) 488-3300.Through Oct. 15: "The Plough and the Stars"; Sept. 29-Nov. 19: "Holiday Heart"; Nov. 10-Dec. 31: "The Matchmaker"; Dec. 8-Jan. 28: "The Waiting Room"; Jan. 19-Feb. 18: "Coming of the Hurricane"; Feb. 16-Mar. 31: "The Dance of Death"; Mar. 22-May 26: "Candide"; April 19-June 9: "Blithe Spirit."* Center Stage, 700 North Calvert St. (410) 332-0033.Oct. 6-Nov. 5: "Don Juan," Pearlstone Theater; Nov. 10-Dec. 23: "Day of Absence" and "Open Admissions," Head Theater; Jan. 5- Feb. 4: "The Taming of the Shrew," Pearlstone Theater; Feb. 16-March 31: "The Lover," Head Theater; March 22-April 21: "Spunk," Pearlstone Theater; May 3-June 2: "Private Lives," Pearlstone Theater.
TRAVEL
By JOE BURRIS and JOE BURRIS,SUN REPORTER | December 18, 2005
There are scores of travel brochures and Web sites that list things to do in Washington for the holidays. What's striking about most, however, is that they include as many attractions in the suburbs as those within the city limits. That seems a bit odd, considering how long it takes to navigate through gridlock around the nation's capital. Nothing against scenic light displays in Wheaton or a gingerbread house in Arlington, Va., but a holiday in Washington should be just that, even if you're just coming from the Baltimore area.
FEATURES
April 14, 2006
April 14 1865: President Abraham Lincoln was shot and mortally wounded by John Wilkes Booth while at Ford's Theatre in Washington.
FEATURES
By J. WYNN ROUSUCK and J. WYNN ROUSUCK,SUN THEATER CRITIC | March 28, 2006
Producing Shenandoah at Ford's Theatre in Washington sounded like a good idea for several reasons. The show is set during the Civil War, and Ford's is a major landmark of that era. In addition, when this 1975 anti-war musical debuted, the country was still reeling from Vietnam; three decades later, the nation is at loggerheads over our involvement in another foreign conflict. Finally, this revival is directed by Jeff Calhoun, whose Deaf West production of Big River - set just before the Civil War - was one of the finest shows this critic has ever seen at Ford's.
FEATURES
By J. WYNN ROUSUCK and J. WYNN ROUSUCK,SUN THEATER CRITIC | February 6, 2006
Trying, Joanna McClelland Glass' play about former Attorney General Francis Biddle, isn't a trying experience at all. To the contrary, thanks in large part to the well-modulated performances of James Whitmore as octogenarian Biddle and Karron Graves as his last personal secretary, the production at Ford's Theatre in Washington is a touching examination of the unexpected, intergenerational friendship that developed between two tough-minded individuals....
TRAVEL
By JOE BURRIS and JOE BURRIS,SUN REPORTER | December 18, 2005
There are scores of travel brochures and Web sites that list things to do in Washington for the holidays. What's striking about most, however, is that they include as many attractions in the suburbs as those within the city limits. That seems a bit odd, considering how long it takes to navigate through gridlock around the nation's capital. Nothing against scenic light displays in Wheaton or a gingerbread house in Arlington, Va., but a holiday in Washington should be just that, even if you're just coming from the Baltimore area.
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,SUN THEATER CRITIC | May 19, 2005
Life is long, hard and strange. Of the three, I'll take the strange," proclaims a character in Erik Ehn's 13 Christs. Plays don't come much stranger than this one, commissioned and produced by Run of the Mill Theater and written by the recently appointed dean of the School of Theater at the California Institute of the Arts. Director James Knipple has staged eight of the 13 short pieces that make up this esoteric melange of Christian, Native American, mythological and pop cultural references and imagery.
NEWS
May 1, 2005
Mary Kelly Michels, a homemaker and community volunteer, died of a stroke Friday at St. Joseph Medical Center. The Timonium resident was 75. Born Mary Kelly in Baltimore and raised on 21st Street, she attended St. Ann's Parochial School and was a 1948 graduate of the Institute of Notre Dame. She earned a bachelor's degree from the College of Notre Dame of Maryland, where she remained active in its continuing studies program, the Renaissance Institute. In 1951 she married Francis X. Gallagher Sr., an attorney who ran successfully for the Maryland House of Delegates in 1958 and was later appointed Peoples' Counsel.
FEATURES
April 14, 2006
April 14 1865: President Abraham Lincoln was shot and mortally wounded by John Wilkes Booth while at Ford's Theatre in Washington.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Stephen Kiehl and Stephen Kiehl,Sun Staff | April 17, 2005
Assassination Vacation By Sarah Vowell. Simon & Schuster. 259 pages. $21. Sarah Vowell would not seem to be the ideal travel companion. She gets seasick easily. She can't read maps. And when faced with the choice of snorkeling in the Dry Tortugas or touring the prison that held the co-conspirators in the Lincoln assassination, she'll take the prison every time. In her new book, Assassination Vacation, Vowell tours historic sites linked to the assassinations of Presidents Abraham Lincoln, James A. Garfield and William McKinley.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Sam Sessa and Sam Sessa,SUN STAFF | November 25, 2004
Adapting an old play is no big deal. But when it comes to a holiday classic such as A Christmas Carol, scriptwriter Michael Wilson and director Matt August knew they had to be a little bit more careful. Consider that the play, which runs through Jan. 2, has been an annual staple at Ford's Theatre in Washington for many years. Some people see it as a tradition. "It's a little daunting," August said. "It just makes the challenge that much greater." While keeping the production in the same time period as before, this new version introduces new costumes, sounds, lighting, set design and a new character: Charles Dickens.
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