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NEWS
October 13, 2000
ANNAPOLIS - Maryland's Smart Growth and Neighborhood Conservation initiative was named a winner yesterday of an Innovations in American Government award from the John F. Kennedy School of Government at Harvard University. The initiative, a centerpiece of Gov. Parris N. Glendening's administration, was one of 10 winners out of more than 1,300 entries from federal, state and local governments. Each winner receives $100,000 from the Ford Foundation. Judges recognized the Maryland program as the first statewide effort to control sprawl and promote environmentally sensitive development through the use of budgetary incentives.
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NEWS
By New York Times News Service | January 14, 2007
For most of the past century, three names - Carnegie, Ford and Rockefeller - have defined the world of foundation philanthropy, but that is changing. The Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation, with a $30 billion-plus endowment that dwarfs all others, now dominates discussions of philanthropy, and the philanthropic experiments of young billionaires like Pierre Omidyar and Jeff Skoll are studied and mimicked. But the Carnegie Corp. and the Rockefeller Foundation are fighting back, hoping to get more impact for their money, increase their influence and extend their legacies by changing the way they have operated for years.
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NEWS
November 18, 1992
The CollegeBound Foundation, which this year will give grants to some 250 college students from Baltimore City, has begun receiving $325,000 pledged by the Ford Foundation over the next three years to support its operations.The money is part of an $892,000 grant from Ford to the Baltimore Community Foundation to evaluate programs helping low-income high school students go to college. Some of that money is going to CollegeBound through the Baltimore Community Foundation.The Baltimore Community Foundation was created in 1972 and is funded with money from businesses and philanthropic organizations.
BUSINESS
By NICK MADIGAN and NICK MADIGAN,SUN REPORTER | August 10, 2006
The Maryland-based Calvert Foundation and two other organizations unveiled yesterday an investment program to provide help for public radio stations, some of which are financially strapped, as well as money to acquire new ones. The Public Radio Fund will be the largest capital-raising effort ever attempted for noncommercial radio, said a statement announcing its launch. Other backers of the fund are New York's Ford Foundation and Public Radio Capital, a nonprofit in Denver. The Calvert Foundation, which has its headquarters in Bethesda, has primarily focused on helping disadvantaged communities.
NEWS
By Laura Loh and Laura Loh,SUN STAFF | August 3, 2004
The Baltimore school system has been awarded a $125,000 grant from the Ford Foundation to create partnerships with local arts institutions that would make music, drama and other cultural arts an integral part of the school day. To help pupils absorb lessons about the Declaration of Independence, for example, museums might be persuaded to host traveling exhibits from the Smithsonian Institution or museums in Philadelphia, said schools chief Bonnie S....
NEWS
August 2, 2006
Louis Winnick, 85, an economist who helped guide the investments of the Ford Foundation and promoted low-income home ownership, died of lung cancer Saturday in Manhasset, N.Y. Mr. Winnick was born in Romania and came to Brooklyn with his family as a young child. He graduated from Brooklyn College and earned graduate degrees in economics at Columbia University. He worked for the New York City Planning Commission and the Housing and Redevelopment Board before joining the Ford Foundation in 1962.
NEWS
By James Bock and James Bock,Sun Staff Writer | November 19, 1994
The NAACP's crushing deficit grew a little lighter yesterday as newly released Ford Foundation grants and other gifts pumped more than $1 million into the civil rights group's coffers.In a letter to corporate and foundation donors, Earl T. Shinhoster, NAACP interim senior administrator, said the Ford Foundation had released a $250,000 grant to the organization. The foundation confirmed the release of the money.Mr. Shinhoster said the Ford Foundation also had authorized the NAACP to withdraw money from an emergency fund set up nearly two years ago with a grant from the foundation.
NEWS
By Linda Linley and Linda Linley,SUN STAFF | November 30, 2001
The headmaster of St. Paul's School is leaving at the end of the school year to become executive director of a philanthropic foundation in Washington. Robert W. Hallett, headmaster at the Brooklandville school since 1985, resigned yesterday to join the Edward E. Ford Foundation, which distributes $3 million to $4 million each year in matching grants to private high schools nationwide. The resignation is effective June 30. Yesterday, Hallett called the foundation job a "once in a lifetime" opportunity.
BUSINESS
By NICK MADIGAN and NICK MADIGAN,SUN REPORTER | August 10, 2006
The Maryland-based Calvert Foundation and two other organizations unveiled yesterday an investment program to provide help for public radio stations, some of which are financially strapped, as well as money to acquire new ones. The Public Radio Fund will be the largest capital-raising effort ever attempted for noncommercial radio, said a statement announcing its launch. Other backers of the fund are New York's Ford Foundation and Public Radio Capital, a nonprofit in Denver. The Calvert Foundation, which has its headquarters in Bethesda, has primarily focused on helping disadvantaged communities.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | October 30, 1997
NEW YORK -- Three buildings - the Ford Foundation Building at 321 E. 42nd St., the CBS headquarters building at 51 W. 52nd St. and the Chase bank branch at 510 Fifth Ave. at 43rd Street - have been designated landmarks by the New York City Landmarks Preservation Commission.The buildings are not the first structures from the 1950s and 1960s to be given the title: Lever House, at 390 Park Ave., and the Seagram Building, at 375 Park Ave., have been landmarks for years.But commission Chairwoman Jennifer J. Raab said the buildings symbolized "our ongoing effort to designate worthy modern buildings as they become eligible" for landmark status.
NEWS
August 2, 2006
Louis Winnick, 85, an economist who helped guide the investments of the Ford Foundation and promoted low-income home ownership, died of lung cancer Saturday in Manhasset, N.Y. Mr. Winnick was born in Romania and came to Brooklyn with his family as a young child. He graduated from Brooklyn College and earned graduate degrees in economics at Columbia University. He worked for the New York City Planning Commission and the Housing and Redevelopment Board before joining the Ford Foundation in 1962.
NEWS
By Laura Loh and Laura Loh,SUN STAFF | August 3, 2004
The Baltimore school system has been awarded a $125,000 grant from the Ford Foundation to create partnerships with local arts institutions that would make music, drama and other cultural arts an integral part of the school day. To help pupils absorb lessons about the Declaration of Independence, for example, museums might be persuaded to host traveling exhibits from the Smithsonian Institution or museums in Philadelphia, said schools chief Bonnie S....
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | July 8, 2003
The board of the Ford Foundation, one of the country's largest private charitable foundations, has decided to keep its chairman despite allegations by federal regulators that he participated in an accounting fraud when he was chairman and chief executive of Xerox Corp. The decision came after the chairman, Paul A. Allaire, agreed to pay a $1 million penalty and forfeit $7.6 million in bonus pay and gains made on stock sales at Xerox and interest on those sums. He was also barred from serving as a director of a public corporation for five years as part of the settlement reached last month with the Securities and Exchange Commission, which said he and five other Xerox executives allowed the company to overstate its profits by $1.4 billion over four years.
NEWS
By Linda Linley and Linda Linley,SUN STAFF | November 30, 2001
The headmaster of St. Paul's School is leaving at the end of the school year to become executive director of a philanthropic foundation in Washington. Robert W. Hallett, headmaster at the Brooklandville school since 1985, resigned yesterday to join the Edward E. Ford Foundation, which distributes $3 million to $4 million each year in matching grants to private high schools nationwide. The resignation is effective June 30. Yesterday, Hallett called the foundation job a "once in a lifetime" opportunity.
NEWS
By Alice Lukens and Alice Lukens,SUN STAFF | March 2, 2001
After years of financial difficulty, the Baltimore Urban League has a plan to get back on track. The league has revamped its leadership, reduced its $1.6 million debt by about half and has improved recordkeeping. Officials are raising money, paying back loans and catching up on delinquent audits. Although the nonprofit organization remains about $800,000 in debt, leaders are optimistic that it soon will regain its reputation as an effective benefactor of the poor. "We lost our wheels, and now need to put them back on," said Marlene C. McLaurin, a United Way official who has been interim chief operating officer since September.
NEWS
October 13, 2000
ANNAPOLIS - Maryland's Smart Growth and Neighborhood Conservation initiative was named a winner yesterday of an Innovations in American Government award from the John F. Kennedy School of Government at Harvard University. The initiative, a centerpiece of Gov. Parris N. Glendening's administration, was one of 10 winners out of more than 1,300 entries from federal, state and local governments. Each winner receives $100,000 from the Ford Foundation. Judges recognized the Maryland program as the first statewide effort to control sprawl and promote environmentally sensitive development through the use of budgetary incentives.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | July 8, 2003
The board of the Ford Foundation, one of the country's largest private charitable foundations, has decided to keep its chairman despite allegations by federal regulators that he participated in an accounting fraud when he was chairman and chief executive of Xerox Corp. The decision came after the chairman, Paul A. Allaire, agreed to pay a $1 million penalty and forfeit $7.6 million in bonus pay and gains made on stock sales at Xerox and interest on those sums. He was also barred from serving as a director of a public corporation for five years as part of the settlement reached last month with the Securities and Exchange Commission, which said he and five other Xerox executives allowed the company to overstate its profits by $1.4 billion over four years.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | January 14, 2007
For most of the past century, three names - Carnegie, Ford and Rockefeller - have defined the world of foundation philanthropy, but that is changing. The Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation, with a $30 billion-plus endowment that dwarfs all others, now dominates discussions of philanthropy, and the philanthropic experiments of young billionaires like Pierre Omidyar and Jeff Skoll are studied and mimicked. But the Carnegie Corp. and the Rockefeller Foundation are fighting back, hoping to get more impact for their money, increase their influence and extend their legacies by changing the way they have operated for years.
NEWS
By Erin Texeira and Erin Texeira,SUN STAFF | April 1, 1999
As balmy spring weather teased students out of classrooms and into the sunshine at the University of Maryland, College Park one afternoon this week, eight students piled into their cars and left campus.They weren't skipping class -- they were enacting a yearlong plan to get people talking and thinking about race relations.An hour later, they were prompting Prince George's County teen-agers, most African-American, to talk about being harassed by police and stalked by store clerks. They were gently teaching them positive responses to the black vs. Latino violence at their middle schools.
NEWS
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | October 7, 1998
WASHINGTON -- Americans believe strongly in the value of ethnic diversity in the United States, but feel the nation is becoming more rather than less divided along racial lines, a poll released yesterday shows.The poll conducted by the DYG Inc. for the Ford Foundation avoids any mention of affirmative action, a hot-button term that tends to draw strong negative reactions. Instead, the New York polling firm asked voters to disclose their feelings concerning the broader and less sensitive topic of diversity on college campuses.
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