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By Nick Anderson and Nick Anderson,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | April 3, 2003
WASHINGTON - As several lawmakers accused military officials of a failure of leadership, the Senate took action yesterday to force the Pentagon to accept an outside review of the sexual assault scandal at the Air Force Academy. By voice vote, the Senate approved a measure requiring Defense Secretary Donald H. Rumsfeld to name by May 1 an independent panel to review the Air Force's response to dozens of allegations of rape, sexual assault and other sexual misconduct at the academy within the past decade.
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NEWS
April 30, 2012
The State Board of Education was right to reject Anne Arundel County Executive John Leopold's attempt to evade the spirit of a law that prevents local jurisdictions from slacking off in their support for public schools. Protest though he might that he had done nothing wrong, Mr. Leopold's budget for the current fiscal year provided less money to support classroom education than in the year before, and had his effort been allowed to stand, that difference - amounting to about $12 million a year - would have been cemented into perpetuity.
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NEWS
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | August 30, 2005
WASHINGTON - Seeking to curb a climate at the U.S. Air Force Academy that some cadets have said is intolerant of non-Christians, the Air Force offered new guidelines yesterday that discourage public prayer, disappointing critics who had sought an outright ban. "Public prayer should not usually be included in official settings such as staff meetings, office meetings, classes or officially sanctioned activities," the new interim policy says. But it notes that prayer can be beneficial under "extraordinary circumstances" such as "mass casualties, preparation for imminent combat or natural disasters."
NEWS
By Peter Spiegel and Peter Spiegel,LOS ANGELES TIMES | April 22, 2008
WASHINGTON -- Defense Secretary Robert M. Gates said yesterday that U.S. military services are not doing enough to support soldiers in Iraq and Afghanistan, singling out the Air Force for adapting too slowly to the new enemies on those battlefields. In unusually harsh public criticism, Gates said his attempts to get the Pentagon to help commanders more quickly on the ground have been "like pulling teeth," and he blamed military leaders who are "stuck in old ways of doing business." He said he was particularly upset with the military's failure to get more unmanned spy planes into the air over the two war zones - primarily an Air Force responsibility.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | April 8, 1993
WASHINGTON -- With different branches of the arme services moving in different directions on the role of women, Defense Secretary Les Aspin says he will establish a common policy governing women in combat in the next several months.Mr. Aspin made his intentions known yesterday after Air Force officials gave details about a program that will stop training female student pilots on high-performance training aircraft.Women on active duty are not allowed to fly combat aircraft, but the high-performance training is an important step toward that goal.
NEWS
By Knight-Ridder News Service | April 14, 1991
WASHINGTON -- The well-oiled coordination the Pentagon showed during Operation Desert Storm appears to be missing from its latest effort to develop a pilotless spy plane.In this case, the Navy and Air Force teamed up to produce what government auditors reveal is a multimillion-dollar misfit.The Navy designed the drone, and the Air Force designed the payload -- a sophisticated video recorder -- only to discover afterward that the payload is too big for the plane or, conversely, that the plane is too small for the payload.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | February 20, 1997
PHILADELPHIA -- When John Hoffman told his supervisor at the Air Reserve Station in suburban Willow Grove last year that he was gay, it did not occur to him that he could be discharged from the reserves and lose his full-time civilian job as a mechanic on the base.But that conversation, which Hoffman thought was private and between friends, caused him to lose both positions.Lawyers from the Pennsylvania chapter of the American Civil Liberties Union who are representing Hoffman say that while Air Force officials may have been able to discharge Hoffman, a Persian Gulf war veteran, from the reserves under the military's "don't ask, don't tell" policy, they discriminated against him when they dismissed him from the civilian post.
NEWS
By Eric Schmitt and Eric Schmitt,New York Times News Service | June 16, 1993
WASHINGTON -- An Air Force inquiry has concluded that a two-star general made disparaging remarks about President Clinton and he now faces disciplinary action that will effectively end his career, senior Air Force officials said yesterday.The Air Force inquiry found that Maj. Gen. Harold N. Campbell called Mr. Clinton a "dope-smoking," "skirt-chasing," "draft-dodging" commander-in-chief, in a speech last month in the Netherlands.Senior military officers are frequently asked at congressional hearings to give their personal opinions on military policies, but it is extremely rare for an officer to ridicule his commander openly, especially the president.
FEATURES
By COX NEWS SERVICE | April 13, 1998
A woman's effort to retire 142 Air Force "astrochimps" from research into AIDS and other diseases has gotten a $1 million boost.Officials from the American Anti-Vivisection Society recently announced that they would donate the money to the Center for Captive Chimpanzee Care, headed by biological anthropologist Carole Noon in Boynton Beach, Fla."It brings us up over the laugh level," Noon said. "It legitimizes us."Her organization, which includes anthropologist Jane Goodall, is trying to raise $14 million to buy land and build a sanctuary to observe and monitor the chimps.
NEWS
By MARK MAZZETTI AND GREG MILLER and MARK MAZZETTI AND GREG MILLER,LOS ANGELES TIMES | October 11, 2005
WASHINGTON -- Straining to find troops to maintain force levels in Iraq and Afghanistan, the Pentagon has begun deploying thousands of Air Force personnel to combat zones in new jobs as interrogators, prison sentries and gunners on supply trucks. The Air Force years ago banked its future on fighter jets and billion-dollar satellites. Yet the service that has long avoided being pulled into ground operations is now finding that its people - rather than its weapons - are what the Pentagon needs most as it wages a prolonged war against a low-tech insurgency.
BUSINESS
By McClatchy-Tribune | March 11, 2008
WASHINGTON -- Boeing Co. said yesterday that it would formally protest a $35 billion contract awarded by the Air Force to a team that would use a European plane to replace the aging fleet of U.S. aerial refueling tankers. "Our team has taken a very serious look at the tanker decision and found serious flaws in the process that we believe warrant appeal," W. James McNerney Jr., Boeing's chairman, president and chief executive officer, said in a statement. "This is an extraordinary step rarely taken by our company and one we take very seriously."
NEWS
By Liz Bowie and Liz Bowie,Sun Reporter | July 26, 2007
Maryland school officials labeled five Baltimore middle and high schools "persistently dangerous" yesterday, making the state one of only seven in the nation to apply the federal designation to any of its schools. All five schools were on the list last year and did not make enough progress in reducing student suspensions to get off the list. A few state school board members expressed concern before the vote that the designation puts a harsh label not only on a school but its community.
NEWS
By Laura McCandlish and Laura McCandlish,Sun Reporter | May 27, 2007
Organized resident opposition to the proposed runway expansion for the Carroll County Regional Airport in Westminster will be weighed against potential economic benefits as the county commissioners consider a plan for adoption June 12. The commissioners have to choose among four options for the airport. Consultants from United Research Services (URS) have recommended relocating the runway 250 feet west and 600 feet north - a $56 million option. Other options include leaving the runaway as is, which would require $8.7 million in surface improvements, extending the existing runway for $42.8 million, or relocating it just 375 feet west at $59.3 million.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | November 17, 2006
. The Air Force has conducted more than 2,000 airstrikes in Afghanistan over the past six months, a sharp increase in bombing that reflects the growing demand for U.S. air cover since NATO has assumed a larger ground combat role, Air Force officials said. The intensifying air campaign has focused on southern Afghanistan, where NATO units, primarily from Britain, Canada and the Netherlands, as well as U.S. Special Forces have been engaging in the heaviest and most frequent ground combat with Taliban rebels since the invasion five years ago. The NATO forces are mostly operating without heavy armor or artillery support, and as Taliban resistance has continued, more air support has been used to compensate for the lightness of the units, Air Force officials said.
NEWS
By Peter Spiegel and Peter Spiegel,Los Angeles Times | August 27, 2006
DAVIS-MONTHAN AIR FORCE BASE, Ariz. -- It is only 7 a.m., but John Nimrichter has been pulling parts from outdated military airplanes for an hour. "These things get sizzling hot," he says, looking up at a 1950s-era B-52 bomber sitting on the baked desert just south of Tucson. "You'll lose your breath." Driving up and down endless rows of mothballed fighters, bombers, helicopters and cargo planes, Nimrichter and a crew of 63 fellow Air Force mechanics mine them for replacement parts for aircraft still in use. Many go into planes on the front lines in Iraq and Afghanistan, providing a less expensive way to repair them than buying new parts.
NEWS
By MARK MAZZETTI AND GREG MILLER and MARK MAZZETTI AND GREG MILLER,LOS ANGELES TIMES | October 11, 2005
WASHINGTON -- Straining to find troops to maintain force levels in Iraq and Afghanistan, the Pentagon has begun deploying thousands of Air Force personnel to combat zones in new jobs as interrogators, prison sentries and gunners on supply trucks. The Air Force years ago banked its future on fighter jets and billion-dollar satellites. Yet the service that has long avoided being pulled into ground operations is now finding that its people - rather than its weapons - are what the Pentagon needs most as it wages a prolonged war against a low-tech insurgency.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | November 17, 2006
. The Air Force has conducted more than 2,000 airstrikes in Afghanistan over the past six months, a sharp increase in bombing that reflects the growing demand for U.S. air cover since NATO has assumed a larger ground combat role, Air Force officials said. The intensifying air campaign has focused on southern Afghanistan, where NATO units, primarily from Britain, Canada and the Netherlands, as well as U.S. Special Forces have been engaging in the heaviest and most frequent ground combat with Taliban rebels since the invasion five years ago. The NATO forces are mostly operating without heavy armor or artillery support, and as Taliban resistance has continued, more air support has been used to compensate for the lightness of the units, Air Force officials said.
BUSINESS
By McClatchy-Tribune | March 11, 2008
WASHINGTON -- Boeing Co. said yesterday that it would formally protest a $35 billion contract awarded by the Air Force to a team that would use a European plane to replace the aging fleet of U.S. aerial refueling tankers. "Our team has taken a very serious look at the tanker decision and found serious flaws in the process that we believe warrant appeal," W. James McNerney Jr., Boeing's chairman, president and chief executive officer, said in a statement. "This is an extraordinary step rarely taken by our company and one we take very seriously."
NEWS
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | August 30, 2005
WASHINGTON - Seeking to curb a climate at the U.S. Air Force Academy that some cadets have said is intolerant of non-Christians, the Air Force offered new guidelines yesterday that discourage public prayer, disappointing critics who had sought an outright ban. "Public prayer should not usually be included in official settings such as staff meetings, office meetings, classes or officially sanctioned activities," the new interim policy says. But it notes that prayer can be beneficial under "extraordinary circumstances" such as "mass casualties, preparation for imminent combat or natural disasters."
NEWS
By Stephen Kiehl and Stephen Kiehl,SUN STAFF | April 25, 2004
The Baltimore Beltway can't get much bigger. Fifty years after construction began on the 52-mile roadway that rings the city, state officials say they're running out of room to expand. Housing developments and suburban shopping centers are hard up against it, with sound barriers holding the line at the edge of people's back yards. Space is particularly tight on the southwest side through Catonsville, where work to add a lane should be done this fall. There are also plans to add a lane or two to the northeast side when money is available and to the west side by Interstate 70. But after that, nothing else is planned - meaning officials have to find ways to keep traffic moving that don't involve pouring more asphalt.
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