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Force Against Iraq

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By Julie Hirschfeld Davis and Julie Hirschfeld Davis,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | October 3, 2002
WASHINGTON - In a breakthrough for the White House, key Republicans and Democrats agreed with President Bush yesterday on a measure authorizing him to use force against Iraq. The agreement sets the stage for Congress' approval of a war resolution as early as next week. The compromise - the product of negotiations by the White House and bipartisan House and Senate leaders - won broad backing. It would allow Bush to invade Iraq, provided he declared to Congress that further diplomacy was useless and that an attack would not hinder the war on terrorism.
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NEWS
October 14, 2007
Five years ago, Congress passed the "Authorization for Use of Military Force Against Iraq," which was a way of passing the buck to President Bush in an election season and letting him decide whether to launch an invasion. Ever since then, events have confirmed the wisdom of the authors of the Constitution, who wrote that Congress shall have the power to declare war. It's time to bring Article I, Section 8 back into force. It's worth rereading the actual authorization, to see what's wrong with it. There is some verbiage but not an overwhelming amount on the issue of weapons of mass destruction.
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NEWS
January 6, 1991
No one knows what will happen if Iraq does not withdraw from Kuwait before the Jan. 15 deadline set by the United Nations.The confusion surrounding the situation in the Persian Gulf and what might happen raises many questions. The Sun will go to the experts to try to answer as many of your questions as possible about the gulf crisis and what may follow the deadline authorizing the use of force against Iraq.Tell us your questions by calling Sundial, The Sun's audio information service, today or tomorrow.
NEWS
By Kathleen Parker | May 4, 2007
Of all the words spilled during the recent Democratic presidential debate, the most interesting were 27 of Hillary Rodham Clinton's in response to a question about the candidates' biggest mistakes. The New York senator began self-effacingly, saying that her mistakes were too numerous to list, but offered a couple: that whole health care thing. "And, you know, believing the president when he said he would go to the United Nations and put inspectors into Iraq to determine whether they had WMD."
NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | November 23, 1990
SANA, Yemen -- Secretary of State James A. Baker III, in his quest for a new United Nations resolution authorizing the use of force against Iraq, failed to win the support of Yemen, the only Arab nation presently on the U.N. Security Council, during a visit here yesterday."
NEWS
By Diana Jean Schemo and Diana Jean Schemo,Paris Bureau of The Sun | November 14, 1990
PARIS -- President Bush will probably use his visit here next week to sound out French President Francois Mitterrand on the circumstances under which France would support a military offensive to force Iraq out of Kuwait, a senior diplomatic source here said.Mr. Bush will be in Paris with the leaders of 32 European nations and Canada for the Conference on Security and Cooperation in Europe.The source said that Secretary of State James A. Baker III concluded last week's eight-nation tour without clear assurances that Paris would support a U.N. Security Council resolution authorizing the use of force against Iraq.
NEWS
March 7, 1991
Among the members of Congress assembled for President Bush's speech last night were Maryland legislators who were painfully divided, along policy more than partisan lines, when the fateful decision was made approving the use of force against Iraq.Rep. Tom McMillen, a Democrat, in support of the president, said there was no evidence economic sanctions would remove Iraq from Kuwait and warned that postponement of the Jan. 15 use-of-force deadline would allow the Iraqi dictator to conserve his military strength and risk the erosion of world support for the whole enterprise.
NEWS
By Mark Matthews and Tom Bowman and Mark Matthews and Tom Bowman,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | November 12, 1997
WASHINGTON -- As American diplomats try to rebuild the once-powerful coalition that drove Iraq from Kuwait in 1991, they are being undercut at almost every turn.Russia declared its adamant opposition yesterday to the use of force against Iraq, and China appeared to agree.Egypt highlighted the general Arab unhappiness with the United States by announcing that it would boycott a U.S.-promoted Middle East economic conference.And France, while critical of Iraq, granted Baghdad's deputy prime minister, Tariq Aziz, a high-level meeting in Paris while he was en route to the United Nations on Sunday.
NEWS
By Mark Matthews and Mark Matthews,Sun Staff Correspondent | November 29, 1990
UNITED NATIONS -- A final drive for votes went into the early morning today as Secretary of State James A. Baker III sought support from China for a U.N. authorization of force against Iraq and a commitment from Cuba not to oppose it.U.S. and other diplomats, predicting a solid majority in the Security Council today, ruled out the possibility of a Chinese veto. But Mr. Baker was to meet late last night with China's foreign minister, Qian Qichen, in what appeared to be a final push for a yes vote.
NEWS
By Peter Osterlund and Peter Osterlund,Washington Bureau of The Sun | January 8, 1991
WASHINGTON -- House leaders, smarting from accusations that Congress is vacillating in the Western alliance's accelerating war of nerves with Iraq, have decided to hold a vote on the U.S. Persian Gulf policy by Saturday.House Speaker Thomas S. Foley, D-Wash., said yesterday that the House will meet Thursday to begin formal debate on President Bush's strategy toward Iraq."To say that we don't want to take a position because we want to be on both sides is untrue," Mr. Foley said. "We are going to take a position."
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | March 2, 2003
BAGHDAD, Iraq - Iraq began destroying its short-range Al Samoud missiles yesterday, crushing four of them with a bulldozer under the supervision of United Nations weapons inspectors, the latest in a series of clearly distasteful steps that Baghdad has taken in hopes of staving off war. Demetrius Perricos, the deputy U.N. weapons inspector, said just four were crushed yesterday out of a stock of about 100. He said Iraq indicated that it could deliver only...
NEWS
By Julie Hirschfeld Davis and Julie Hirschfeld Davis,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | October 3, 2002
WASHINGTON - In a breakthrough for the White House, key Republicans and Democrats agreed with President Bush yesterday on a measure authorizing him to use force against Iraq. The agreement sets the stage for Congress' approval of a war resolution as early as next week. The compromise - the product of negotiations by the White House and bipartisan House and Senate leaders - won broad backing. It would allow Bush to invade Iraq, provided he declared to Congress that further diplomacy was useless and that an attack would not hinder the war on terrorism.
NEWS
By Julie Hirschfeld Davis and David L. Greene and Julie Hirschfeld Davis and David L. Greene,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | September 27, 2002
WASHINGTON - President Bush narrowed his request to Congress yesterday for authorization to launch a unilateral attack against Iraq, offering to impose some limits on a broad resolution he proposed last week. The new language was an effort to forge a quick agreement on a war resolution that Congress will begin debating next week and will probably approve within the next two weeks. But it fell short of what many Democrats were looking for. The Bush proposal would give him the authority to invade Iraq without requiring him first to use all possible diplomatic and peaceful means to avoid war. "There are a number of issues that remain ones that are unresolved, as far as we're concerned," Senate Majority Leader Tom Daschle of South Dakota said after he and his fellow Democrats had reviewed the draft.
NEWS
By Richard Halloran | September 18, 2002
HONOLULU -- When Caspar Weinberger was defense secretary in the Reagan administration, he forged a set of guidelines intended to govern the application of U.S. military force as an instrument of national policy. Among them: Military force should be applied only as a last resort, it should serve a vital national interest and it must have reasonable assurance of public support. Gauged by those principles, which have been accepted by many American military leaders and strategic thinkers, President Bush's call to arms against Saddam Hussein's Iraq has not yet measured up even though he moved the process forward last week.
NEWS
By Mark Matthews and Tom Bowman and Mark Matthews and Tom Bowman,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | November 12, 1997
WASHINGTON -- As American diplomats try to rebuild the once-powerful coalition that drove Iraq from Kuwait in 1991, they are being undercut at almost every turn.Russia declared its adamant opposition yesterday to the use of force against Iraq, and China appeared to agree.Egypt highlighted the general Arab unhappiness with the United States by announcing that it would boycott a U.S.-promoted Middle East economic conference.And France, while critical of Iraq, granted Baghdad's deputy prime minister, Tariq Aziz, a high-level meeting in Paris while he was en route to the United Nations on Sunday.
NEWS
August 27, 1992
George Bush and Bill Clinton were markedly defensive and less than candid in separate appearances this week before the American Legion.The Republican president stoutly defended his decision to halt combat operations against Saddam Hussein's fleeing legions in February 1991, saying he was not in the slaughter business. He made no mention, however, of his attempts to placate Iraq, despite warnings of its warlike intentions, by offering it economic aid almost to the day it invaded Kuwait. Nor did he deal with the resulting slaughter of Kurds in the north and Shiites in the south of Iraq because the United States did not wipe out Baghdad's elite forces when it had the chance.
NEWS
By Gilbert A. Lewthwaite and Gilbert A. Lewthwaite,London Bureau of The Sun | January 16, 1991
LONDON -- The British Parliament gave overwhelming eve-of-deadline backing yesterday to the use of allied military force against Iraq.A 534-57 vote at the end of an emergency parliamentary debate gave Prime Minister John Major's government approval for going to war.The vote came despite opposition from the minority parties and reference to misgivings expressed by a substantial minority of members of the U.S. Congress during the recent Persian Gulf debate.In...
NEWS
August 27, 1992
George Bush and Bill Clinton were markedly defensive and less than candid in separate appearances this week before the American Legion.The Republican president stoutly defended his decision to halt combat operations against Saddam Hussein's fleeing legions in February 1991, saying he was not in the slaughter business. He made no mention, however, of his attempts to placate Iraq, despite warnings of its warlike intentions, by offering it economic aid almost to the day it invaded Kuwait. Nor did he deal with the resulting slaughter of Kurds in the north and Shiites in the south of Iraq because the United States did not wipe out Baghdad's elite forces when it had the chance.
NEWS
By Mark Matthews and Mark Matthews,Washington Bureau | March 13, 1992
WASHINGTON -- The U.N. Security Council set the stage yesterday for destruction of Iraqi nuclear and missile facilities, by fTC force if necessary.After two days of meetings with Deputy Prime Minister Tariq Aziz, the council said Iraq "has not yet complied fully and unconditionally" with resolutions requiring disclosure and destruction of its weapons of mass destruction and the means to produce them.Reacting skeptically to Mr. Aziz's pledges of cooperation, the council said that Iraq "must immediately take the appropriate actions in this regard," and expressed hopes that the goodwill presented by Mr. Aziz "will be matched by deeds."
NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | July 29, 1991
WASHINGTON -- President Bush, warning that the use of force is still a "viable option," said yesterday that Iraq will be making an "enormous mistake" if it does not disclose all its nuclear capabilities to United Nations inspectors.But confirming that some U.S. allies are reluctant to start the Persian Gulf war again, Mr. Bush said that he had set no new deadline for Iraq to comply with a United Nations cease-fire requirement obligating it to disclose all information about its nuclear, chemical and biological weapons programs.
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