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NEWS
By Arin Gencer and Arin Gencer,[Sun Reporter] | January 14, 2007
The Carroll County Board of Education is considering a request that would reduce the graduation requirements for students who attend the Forbush School, a nonpublic school for Carroll students with significant mental, behavioral or emotional challenges. If the board approves the change, Carroll students at the Towson campus would need only 21 credits to graduate, instead of the 25 required by county public schools. It could also save money -- namely, the average $50,000 per year for each student in nonpublic schools.
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NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | April 26, 2013
Frank Bond Sr., a retired Maryland Transit Administration bus driver and neighborhood activist who believed in the value of education, died Monday of colon cancer at Gilchrist Hospice Care in Towson. "Frank was a wonderful man who treasured education even though he was not an educated man," said W. Byron Forbush II, who retired in 1998 after 38 years as headmaster of Friends School. "His three children went to Friends as well as two grandchildren," said Mr. Forbush. "He was so devoted and proud that his family was part of that institution.
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NEWS
By Arin Gencer and Arin Gencer,arin.gencer@baltsun.com | August 16, 2009
A distinct bustle filled the kitchen of the Falcon's Nest cafe as 11 a.m. approached. "Excuse me - hot," said Katina Guyton, pulling a tray of ciabatta rolls from the oven and walking to the counter out front. There, with gloves and black hairnets snapped on, her colleagues - also her classmates - were lining up behind a display of deli meats, cheeses, soups and other food. It was almost time for the lunch-hour rush of students and staff at the Forbush School at Glyndon. At the Falcon's Nest, students run the show - from food preparation to the cleanup.
NEWS
By Arin Gencer and Arin Gencer,arin.gencer@baltsun.com | August 16, 2009
A distinct bustle filled the kitchen of the Falcon's Nest cafe as 11 a.m. approached. "Excuse me - hot," said Katina Guyton, pulling a tray of ciabatta rolls from the oven and walking to the counter out front. There, with gloves and black hairnets snapped on, her colleagues - also her classmates - were lining up behind a display of deli meats, cheeses, soups and other food. It was almost time for the lunch-hour rush of students and staff at the Forbush School at Glyndon. At the Falcon's Nest, students run the show - from food preparation to the cleanup.
NEWS
August 11, 1992
Charles K. BerryPost office supervisorCharles K. Berry, a retired supervisor at the main post office in Baltimore, died Saturday of cancer at the Manor Care Towson Nursing and Rehabilitation Center.Services for Mr. Berry, who was 77 and lived on De Soto Road in the city, will be at 8 tonight at the Hubbard Funeral Home, 4107 Wilkens Ave.He retired 20 years ago after working 35 years for the U.S. Postal Service.Born in Baltimore, he was a 1933 graduate of Polytechnic Institute.He was a member of the Army's 29th Division during World War II. He was wounded in Europe and awarded a Purple Heart.
NEWS
March 4, 1996
Bliss Forbush Jr., 75, Friends School teacherBliss Forbush Jr., a retired Friends School science and math teacher, died Thursday of injuries he suffered in a fall while visiting a sister in Maryville, Tenn. The Ruxton resident was 75.Mr. Forbush, who graduated from Friends School in 1940, taught there from 1950 until 1986.His father, the late Bliss Forbush Sr., a Quaker leader and historian, was headmaster of Friends School from 1943 until his retirement in 1960. His brother, W. Byron Forbush II of Homeland, succeeded their father as headmaster of the school on North Charles Street.
NEWS
By Mary Maushard and Mary Maushard,SUN STAFF | April 10, 1998
W. Byron Forbush II has run Friends School for 38 years. He wanted no surprises at his goodbye party.But the students didn't heed their departing headmaster.At a well-planned convocation, they rolled out an unexpected, and momentarily breathtaking, gift -- a ceramic table set with more than 1,000 tiles, each painted by a student or faculty member to represent the 1,010 students and "many faces of Friends School."The glib Forbush was surprised, though speechless for only seconds."I'm not sure I can even respond to that," Forbush said, his voice filling with emotion.
NEWS
June 10, 2004
Henry Forbush Schorreck, a former National Security Administration historian and high school lacrosse coach, died of a heart attack Saturday while driving near Bradenton, Fla. The former Pasadena resident was 67. Mr. Schorreck was born in Baltimore and raised in the Hamilton neighborhood. He was a 1955 graduate of Friends School, and played midfield for its 1954 championship lacrosse team that was inducted into the school's Athletic Hall of Fame this year. He earned bachelor's and master's degrees in history from the University of Maryland, College Park and began his career as an NSA historian at Fort Meade in 1965.
NEWS
By Brent Jones and Brent Jones,Sun Reporter | May 2, 2008
The couple were visiting Baltimore for the first time 17 years ago when they decided to make an impromptu visit to a private school on Charles Street. Paul and Margaret Strasburg met with administrators at Friends School, a conversation that eventually turned into a $1.28 million pledged endowment at the time of their deaths, the largest gift ever received by the school. The Strasburgs' benevolence has captivated former and current administrators at the school. Neither of the Strasburgs attended Friends.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | April 26, 2013
Frank Bond Sr., a retired Maryland Transit Administration bus driver and neighborhood activist who believed in the value of education, died Monday of colon cancer at Gilchrist Hospice Care in Towson. "Frank was a wonderful man who treasured education even though he was not an educated man," said W. Byron Forbush II, who retired in 1998 after 38 years as headmaster of Friends School. "His three children went to Friends as well as two grandchildren," said Mr. Forbush. "He was so devoted and proud that his family was part of that institution.
NEWS
By Brent Jones and Brent Jones,Sun Reporter | May 2, 2008
The couple were visiting Baltimore for the first time 17 years ago when they decided to make an impromptu visit to a private school on Charles Street. Paul and Margaret Strasburg met with administrators at Friends School, a conversation that eventually turned into a $1.28 million pledged endowment at the time of their deaths, the largest gift ever received by the school. The Strasburgs' benevolence has captivated former and current administrators at the school. Neither of the Strasburgs attended Friends.
NEWS
By Arin Gencer and Arin Gencer,[Sun Reporter] | January 14, 2007
The Carroll County Board of Education is considering a request that would reduce the graduation requirements for students who attend the Forbush School, a nonpublic school for Carroll students with significant mental, behavioral or emotional challenges. If the board approves the change, Carroll students at the Towson campus would need only 21 credits to graduate, instead of the 25 required by county public schools. It could also save money -- namely, the average $50,000 per year for each student in nonpublic schools.
NEWS
June 10, 2004
Henry Forbush Schorreck, a former National Security Administration historian and high school lacrosse coach, died of a heart attack Saturday while driving near Bradenton, Fla. The former Pasadena resident was 67. Mr. Schorreck was born in Baltimore and raised in the Hamilton neighborhood. He was a 1955 graduate of Friends School, and played midfield for its 1954 championship lacrosse team that was inducted into the school's Athletic Hall of Fame this year. He earned bachelor's and master's degrees in history from the University of Maryland, College Park and began his career as an NSA historian at Fort Meade in 1965.
BUSINESS
By Meredith Cohn and Meredith Cohn,SUN STAFF | December 8, 2000
Sheppard Pratt Health Systems will move its special education school to Baltimore from Towson and build a parking garage with a gymnasium on top, according to plans it presented yesterday to the city's Design Advisory Panel. Representatives of the Forbush School told the panel, which reviews projects for the city, that their school would move into the old Seton High School building in Charles Village. Sheppard Pratt has a contract to buy the school building from investment companies controlled by the Knott family, along with the Dell House apartments and a parking lot. Officials of the Forbush School - which is for emotionally disturbed children - don't plan to alter the exterior of the high school building.
BUSINESS
By Meredith Cohn and Meredith Cohn,SUN STAFF | October 6, 2000
Sheppard Pratt Health System is considering moving its special education school from its Towson campus to a former high school in Baltimore, the hospital said yesterday. The psychiatric care provider has a contract to buy the former Seton High School building and neighboring Dell House apartments in Charles Village. A final decision has not been made on uses for the buildings, but the school is a strong possibility, said Lindsay Thompson, project liaison for Sheppard Pratt. The Forbush School, which educates students age 4 to 21 with behavior and other problems, must vacate its building in Towson within the next five years.
NEWS
By Lynn Anderson and Lynn Anderson,SUN STAFF | October 4, 1999
At the public high school he used to attend in Harford County, Garry Lee was attacked and viciously pummeled by four boys. Now, as a student at the Forbush School in Towson -- an institution for students with behavioral problems -- Garry feels far safer than he did. Thanks in part to a new curriculum teaching nonviolence and kindness, students such as Garry feel sheltered at the school, on the wooded grounds of Sheppard and Enoch Pratt Hospital....
NEWS
By Mary Maushard and Mary Maushard,SUN STAFF | February 13, 1997
'TC W. Byron Forbush II, who has spent much of his career and most of his life at Baltimore's Friends School, announced yesterday that he will retire in June 1998 after 38 years as headmaster.A fixture in independent education locally and nationally, Forbush is by far the longest-serving headmaster in Maryland, and perhaps in the country. His father, Bliss Forbush Sr., also led the Quaker school, from 1943 to 1960.He announced his long-rumored retirement at a meeting of the school's more than 200 staff and faculty members yesterday afternoon, and in a letter to parents of the school's 990 students, which was mailed yesterday.
NEWS
By Lynn Anderson and Lynn Anderson,SUN STAFF | October 4, 1999
At the public high school he used to attend in Harford County, Garry Lee was attacked and viciously pummeled by four boys. Now, as a student at the Forbush School in Towson -- an institution for students with behavioral problems -- Garry feels far safer than he did. Thanks in part to a new curriculum teaching nonviolence and kindness, students such as Garry feel sheltered at the school, on the wooded grounds of Sheppard and Enoch Pratt Hospital....
NEWS
By Jamie Smith and Jamie Smith,SUN STAFF | June 10, 1998
With years of TV and movie-viewing under her belt, Erin Hilton thinks she has a pretty good idea why images of violence can deeply affect children."Violence is power, and everyone wants to be powerful," said the 17-year-old, a ninth-grader at Sheppard Pratt Health System's Forbush School in Towson.This is what organizers of the first high school Critical Viewing Workshop, held yesterday at the school, hoped to hear: a sophisticated understanding of the violence in television shows, and video games and other media.
NEWS
By Mary Maushard and Mary Maushard,SUN STAFF | April 10, 1998
W. Byron Forbush II has run Friends School for 38 years. He wanted no surprises at his goodbye party.But the students didn't heed their departing headmaster.At a well-planned convocation, they rolled out an unexpected, and momentarily breathtaking, gift -- a ceramic table set with more than 1,000 tiles, each painted by a student or faculty member to represent the 1,010 students and "many faces of Friends School."The glib Forbush was surprised, though speechless for only seconds."I'm not sure I can even respond to that," Forbush said, his voice filling with emotion.
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