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By Ian Johnson and Ian Johnson,Sun Staff Correspondent | December 19, 1994
TAIPEI, Taiwan -- For a wonderful six years earlier this century, ordinary people had the opportunity to see the Chinese emperors' personal collection of art displayed in their palaces in Beijing's Forbidden City.But war, civil war and cold war have since cut the extraordinary 900,000-piece collection in two, with the bulk of it buried in bomb-proof bunkers under a mountain in Taiwan, only a fraction coming to light each year for exhibitions. The emperors' palaces in the Forbidden City remain empty, with little to remind visitors that they once housed one of the world's greatest art collections.
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NEWS
Robert L. Ehrlich Jr | June 24, 2012
The Ehrlich boys sure love their summer Slurpees. Even the 50-something Ehrlich kid is not averse to indulging on the way home from those hot summer football practices. (Mom does not share our male addiction but usually lets us slide in the interest of family unity.) That the Ehrlich Slurpee bonding experience takes place in Annapolis and not New York City is a good thing, as the Big Apple now deals with the latest assault on individual freedom from Mayor Michael Bloomberg. The successor to the wildly successful Rudy Giuliani is a billionaire Democrat-turned-Republican-turned-independent.
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FEATURES
By Seth Faison and Seth Faison,NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | October 19, 1997
Of all China's illustrious and history-rich places , perhaps none is quite so stunning in scope and design as the Forbidden City, the palace complex in Beijing where emperors once lived and ruled.It may also be the hardest to keep up. A vast collection of courtyards, halls and former living quarters spread out over 250 acres, the Forbidden City is forever fighting crumbling walls, decaying roofs and shaky pavilions.China's Bureau of Relics recently announced that it would begin a $25 million renovation of the Forbidden City, or part of it anyway, mostly along the exterior walls, where a moat surrounds the old palace.
SPORTS
By Los Angeles Times | August 10, 2008
BEIJING - One team, more dreams than you can count with an abacus. Even for games that are purely for sport, aside from the political message that is the same from Atlanta to the Forbidden City - Look at our vibrant society! - and the overriding commercial presence, few Olympians ever functioned on as many levels as the NBA stars representing U.S. basketball. Like the legendary Dream Team at Barcelona in 1992 - well, almost - this one has a fallen banner to raise from the dust ... not to mention an unparalleled marketing opportunity, making this the right team at the right time in the right market.
NEWS
By Frank Langfitt and Frank Langfitt,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | December 26, 1997
BEIJING -- The Forbidden City is a spectacular palace that Chinese emperors once called home, but it desperately needs a face lift. Vermilion paint peels from the walls, weeds sprout from the ceramic tile roofs and pieces of broken sculpture lie strewn about one of the courtyards.In nearby Hebei Province, two sections of the Great Wall -- one dating to the Tang Dynasty (A.D. 618-907) -- were demolished this year to make way for a new road and the expansion of a vegetable company.As a nation, China bases much of its claim to greatness on its 5,000 years of history and ancient culture, yet at times it treats some of its treasures like second-hand clothes.
NEWS
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | September 7, 1998
BEIJING -- After years of hope and months of hype, the cultural event of the season here opened Saturday as "Turandot" played for the first time in the place where Puccini's beloved opera is set: within the walls of China's famed Forbidden City.Where Ming Dynasty emperors once sacrificed to their ancestors, a cast of hundreds draped in sumptuous hand-sewn costumes sang, glided and paraded their way into history in the $15 million production -- the most expensive opera ever staged, according to organizers.
TRAVEL
By Susan Spano and Susan Spano,Los Angeles Times | November 4, 2007
BEIJING -- A friend planning a trip to Beijing opened a map, pointed to a hotel and said, "I should be able to walk from there to the Forbidden City easily, right?" Not easily. In preparation for the Olympics, which begin Aug. 8 and are expected to draw half a million spectators from abroad and 4 billion TV viewers worldwide, the government has gone on a $40 billion building spree to make these the best Games ever and to turn this into a colossal coming-of-age party for a world-class capital.
NEWS
By Frank Langfitt and Frank Langfitt,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | January 2, 2000
BEIJING -- One of the most remarkable pieces of real estate in China is off the rental market. For two decades, Beijing's Summer Palace, the warm-weather home of emperors, has quietly rented a handful of imperial courtyard houses to foreign businessmen, multinational companies and wealthy Chinese. Newspapers began attacking the practice more than a year ago, comparing overseas tenants to invading soldiers from times past and suggesting that officials were selling out the nation's heritage.
NEWS
By Frank Langfitt and Frank Langfitt,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | December 24, 1998
BEIJING -- A block east of the Forbidden City, Wang Da dons his Santa costume every other hour to spread cheer among customers at the six-story Sun Dong An Plaza -- one of Beijing's mammoth, modern shopping centers.Riding the escalators in a long silver beard with bells jingling from his leather boots, he hands out purple and white balloons as well as wooden tree ornaments from a red bag slung over his shoulder.Many of the children have no idea who Santa is and a few are frightened. Occasionally, though, one recognizes the jolly old elf. "Thank you, Old Man Christmas," says a little boy as Wang hands him a balloon.
NEWS
Robert L. Ehrlich Jr | June 24, 2012
The Ehrlich boys sure love their summer Slurpees. Even the 50-something Ehrlich kid is not averse to indulging on the way home from those hot summer football practices. (Mom does not share our male addiction but usually lets us slide in the interest of family unity.) That the Ehrlich Slurpee bonding experience takes place in Annapolis and not New York City is a good thing, as the Big Apple now deals with the latest assault on individual freedom from Mayor Michael Bloomberg. The successor to the wildly successful Rudy Giuliani is a billionaire Democrat-turned-Republican-turned-independent.
TRAVEL
By Susan Spano and Susan Spano,Los Angeles Times | November 4, 2007
BEIJING -- A friend planning a trip to Beijing opened a map, pointed to a hotel and said, "I should be able to walk from there to the Forbidden City easily, right?" Not easily. In preparation for the Olympics, which begin Aug. 8 and are expected to draw half a million spectators from abroad and 4 billion TV viewers worldwide, the government has gone on a $40 billion building spree to make these the best Games ever and to turn this into a colossal coming-of-age party for a world-class capital.
NEWS
By Frank Langfitt and Frank Langfitt,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | January 2, 2000
BEIJING -- One of the most remarkable pieces of real estate in China is off the rental market. For two decades, Beijing's Summer Palace, the warm-weather home of emperors, has quietly rented a handful of imperial courtyard houses to foreign businessmen, multinational companies and wealthy Chinese. Newspapers began attacking the practice more than a year ago, comparing overseas tenants to invading soldiers from times past and suggesting that officials were selling out the nation's heritage.
NEWS
By Frank Langfitt and Frank Langfitt,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | December 24, 1998
BEIJING -- A block east of the Forbidden City, Wang Da dons his Santa costume every other hour to spread cheer among customers at the six-story Sun Dong An Plaza -- one of Beijing's mammoth, modern shopping centers.Riding the escalators in a long silver beard with bells jingling from his leather boots, he hands out purple and white balloons as well as wooden tree ornaments from a red bag slung over his shoulder.Many of the children have no idea who Santa is and a few are frightened. Occasionally, though, one recognizes the jolly old elf. "Thank you, Old Man Christmas," says a little boy as Wang hands him a balloon.
NEWS
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | September 7, 1998
BEIJING -- After years of hope and months of hype, the cultural event of the season here opened Saturday as "Turandot" played for the first time in the place where Puccini's beloved opera is set: within the walls of China's famed Forbidden City.Where Ming Dynasty emperors once sacrificed to their ancestors, a cast of hundreds draped in sumptuous hand-sewn costumes sang, glided and paraded their way into history in the $15 million production -- the most expensive opera ever staged, according to organizers.
NEWS
By Frank Langfitt and Frank Langfitt,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | December 26, 1997
BEIJING -- The Forbidden City is a spectacular palace that Chinese emperors once called home, but it desperately needs a face lift. Vermilion paint peels from the walls, weeds sprout from the ceramic tile roofs and pieces of broken sculpture lie strewn about one of the courtyards.In nearby Hebei Province, two sections of the Great Wall -- one dating to the Tang Dynasty (A.D. 618-907) -- were demolished this year to make way for a new road and the expansion of a vegetable company.As a nation, China bases much of its claim to greatness on its 5,000 years of history and ancient culture, yet at times it treats some of its treasures like second-hand clothes.
FEATURES
By Seth Faison and Seth Faison,NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | October 19, 1997
Of all China's illustrious and history-rich places , perhaps none is quite so stunning in scope and design as the Forbidden City, the palace complex in Beijing where emperors once lived and ruled.It may also be the hardest to keep up. A vast collection of courtyards, halls and former living quarters spread out over 250 acres, the Forbidden City is forever fighting crumbling walls, decaying roofs and shaky pavilions.China's Bureau of Relics recently announced that it would begin a $25 million renovation of the Forbidden City, or part of it anyway, mostly along the exterior walls, where a moat surrounds the old palace.
SPORTS
By Los Angeles Times | August 10, 2008
BEIJING - One team, more dreams than you can count with an abacus. Even for games that are purely for sport, aside from the political message that is the same from Atlanta to the Forbidden City - Look at our vibrant society! - and the overriding commercial presence, few Olympians ever functioned on as many levels as the NBA stars representing U.S. basketball. Like the legendary Dream Team at Barcelona in 1992 - well, almost - this one has a fallen banner to raise from the dust ... not to mention an unparalleled marketing opportunity, making this the right team at the right time in the right market.
FEATURES
By JOE SCHOLNICK | November 18, 1990
The early morning sun, still low on the horizon, casts grotesque shadows in the main square here as groups of Tai Chi exercisers go through their routines. It's a scene repeated in virtually every Chinese city, but in Shenyang there's a difference. The exercisers brandish long swords or sticks fashioned like swords.This is the gateway to the area of China known as Manchuria. At one time, the Manchus -- hard-riding, hard-fighting warriors whose descendants still exercise with real or symbolic swords -- built an Imperial Palace there, a Forbidden City, the only other such complex in China outside of Beijing.
NEWS
By Ian Johnson and Ian Johnson,Sun Staff Correspondent | December 19, 1994
TAIPEI, Taiwan -- For a wonderful six years earlier this century, ordinary people had the opportunity to see the Chinese emperors' personal collection of art displayed in their palaces in Beijing's Forbidden City.But war, civil war and cold war have since cut the extraordinary 900,000-piece collection in two, with the bulk of it buried in bomb-proof bunkers under a mountain in Taiwan, only a fraction coming to light each year for exhibitions. The emperors' palaces in the Forbidden City remain empty, with little to remind visitors that they once housed one of the world's greatest art collections.
FEATURES
By JOE SCHOLNICK | November 18, 1990
The early morning sun, still low on the horizon, casts grotesque shadows in the main square here as groups of Tai Chi exercisers go through their routines. It's a scene repeated in virtually every Chinese city, but in Shenyang there's a difference. The exercisers brandish long swords or sticks fashioned like swords.This is the gateway to the area of China known as Manchuria. At one time, the Manchus -- hard-riding, hard-fighting warriors whose descendants still exercise with real or symbolic swords -- built an Imperial Palace there, a Forbidden City, the only other such complex in China outside of Beijing.
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