Advertisement
HomeCollectionsForbearance
IN THE NEWS

Forbearance

FIND MORE STORIES ABOUT:
FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
By Eileen Mauskopf | October 3, 2011
Four years into the financial crisis, foreclosure numbers remain daunting, with nearly 80,000 U.S. households receiving default notices for the first time in August. But help might be at hand, now that the Obama administration is requiring mortgage servicers to offer up to 12 months of payment "forbearance" to homeowners who have lost their jobs. The idea is to give borrowers breathing room while they seek work in a difficult job market. And with 111,000 people out of work in the Baltimore area as of August, the need is certainly great locally.
ARTICLES BY DATE
BUSINESS
Eileen Ambrose | February 3, 2012
Stef Gray launched an online protest against a $50 loan forbearance fee imposed by private student loan giant Sallie Mae. The fee is $50 per loan for a maximum of $150 per three-month reprieve on payments. Gray, who says she hasn't been able to find a full-time job since graduating last year, launched an online campaign against the fee. So far she's collected more than 78,000 signatures in support. Sallie Mae said yesterday it is revising the fee, adding that this was something it had been thinking about for some time.
Advertisement
BUSINESS
June 10, 2001
Dear Mr. Azrael, I am currently in a forbearance plan with my mortgage company. My forbearance occurred a few years ago [and] I now owe over $8,700 in interest arrearage. In addition, my interest rate is at 10 percent. I'm now in the position to repay the $8,700 arrearage, but I want to know should I pursue inquiring of a lower rate interest from my mortgage company, or go elsewhere. What options do you suggest? Sherman Moore Pikesville Dear Mr. Moore, Any time a borrower wants to refinance an existing mortgage it's usually a good idea to check with the existing lender to see if it will offer a lower rate.
NEWS
By Eileen Mauskopf | October 3, 2011
Four years into the financial crisis, foreclosure numbers remain daunting, with nearly 80,000 U.S. households receiving default notices for the first time in August. But help might be at hand, now that the Obama administration is requiring mortgage servicers to offer up to 12 months of payment "forbearance" to homeowners who have lost their jobs. The idea is to give borrowers breathing room while they seek work in a difficult job market. And with 111,000 people out of work in the Baltimore area as of August, the need is certainly great locally.
BUSINESS
By KENNETH HARNEY and KENNETH HARNEY,1991 Washington Post Writers Group | February 10, 1991
NEW YORK -- With one out of every 20 home mortgages now delinquent and recession-fed unemployment on the rise, lenders have an urgent message for homeowners in economic trouble: Let's work it out. If you can't pay your monthly mortgage, don't just sit there. Call us early, because we really don't want to foreclose on your house.That's the emerging theme at major banks, S&Ls and mortgage banking firms across the country, particularly in soft housing markets. Some lenders are creating extensive outreach programs to identify and counsel borrowers whose financial ailments may be subject to corrective measures.
BUSINESS
Eileen Ambrose | February 3, 2012
Stef Gray launched an online protest against a $50 loan forbearance fee imposed by private student loan giant Sallie Mae. The fee is $50 per loan for a maximum of $150 per three-month reprieve on payments. Gray, who says she hasn't been able to find a full-time job since graduating last year, launched an online campaign against the fee. So far she's collected more than 78,000 signatures in support. Sallie Mae said yesterday it is revising the fee, adding that this was something it had been thinking about for some time.
BUSINESS
By KENNETH HARNEY | August 15, 2004
FOR HOMEOWNERS, it is the ultimate nightmare: You lose a job or fall seriously ill. You no longer have the money needed to pay the monthly mortgage. Your lender asks what's going on and demands that you pay up, pronto. Suddenly, you are on the icy downward slide to default, foreclosure and loss of your home, your equity and your credit standing. Thousands of American homeowners experience this nightmare every year, but a new, groundbreaking study documents an important countertrend: More than half of homeowners who fall behind on payments on loans owned or insured by the three largest participants in the mortgage market are being offered financial rescue plans designed to save them from the horrors of foreclosure.
BUSINESS
By EILEEN AMBROSE and EILEEN AMBROSE,eileen.ambrose@baltsun.com | October 28, 2008
The grace period on federal student loans is almost over if you graduated from college in the spring. Soon you will have to start making payments. But what if you still haven't landed a job? Or if you have, what if it doesn't pay much? Federal loans offer a variety of repayment options that take hard times, low pay or other situations into account. You might be able to make reduced payments or even postpone them for a time while you get your finances in order. Flexible repayment methods, though, come at a cost.
NEWS
January 21, 1991
Israel is playing it smart. By refusing to retaliate immediately against Iraq's first missile attacks, it has thwarted Saddam Hussein's attempt to widen the gulf war and split the allied coalition right at the outset of fighting. Instead, Iraqi provocations have led to the stationing of U.S.-manned Patriot air defense missiles on Israeli territory and have actually solidified the anti-Iraq coalition.Even at this early date, Israel's reticence appears to have generated sympathy for the Jewish state -- a rare commodity since the Palestinian uprising began.
BUSINESS
By Tom Petruno and Tom Petruno,LOS ANGELES TIMES | September 6, 2005
For the economy and financial markets, Hurricane Katrina may be remembered as a major tipping point. In the short term the storm may have tipped the Federal Reserve against further interest-rate increases, at least temporarily. It also may have convinced many consumers that energy prices aren't likely to come down much soon - which could have implications for how (and whether) they spend money in the near future and possibly beyond. Longer-term, Katrina could tip the scales on the nation's investment priorities, in favor of a greater focus on levees, bridges, roads and other infrastructure that have been allowed to deteriorate.
BUSINESS
By EILEEN AMBROSE and EILEEN AMBROSE,eileen.ambrose@baltsun.com | October 28, 2008
The grace period on federal student loans is almost over if you graduated from college in the spring. Soon you will have to start making payments. But what if you still haven't landed a job? Or if you have, what if it doesn't pay much? Federal loans offer a variety of repayment options that take hard times, low pay or other situations into account. You might be able to make reduced payments or even postpone them for a time while you get your finances in order. Flexible repayment methods, though, come at a cost.
NEWS
By MICHAEL TACKETT and MICHAEL TACKETT,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | December 19, 2005
WASHINGTON -- In the past five years, Americans have seen President Bush in many poses: tough, defiant, emotional. Last night, in a rare Oval Office address, they saw another: humble. A president loath to concede mistakes did so. A president often dismissive of his critics embraced their right to differ. A president whose patience is easily stretched seemed to ask for empathy from others for decisions gone wrong. While there was no substantive shift about the war in Iraq during his prime-time speech, there were stylistic ones.
BUSINESS
By Tom Petruno and Tom Petruno,LOS ANGELES TIMES | September 6, 2005
For the economy and financial markets, Hurricane Katrina may be remembered as a major tipping point. In the short term the storm may have tipped the Federal Reserve against further interest-rate increases, at least temporarily. It also may have convinced many consumers that energy prices aren't likely to come down much soon - which could have implications for how (and whether) they spend money in the near future and possibly beyond. Longer-term, Katrina could tip the scales on the nation's investment priorities, in favor of a greater focus on levees, bridges, roads and other infrastructure that have been allowed to deteriorate.
NEWS
By Henry Chu and Teresa Watanabe and Henry Chu and Teresa Watanabe,LOS ANGELES TIMES | August 20, 2004
BAGHDAD, Iraq - With its twin minarets and glinting gold dome, the Imam Ali mosque in Najaf has been a beacon for the Muslim faithful for more than 1,200 years. But with fighting now raging around the Iraqi shrine, one of the holiest sites in Shiite Islam has reprised another historical role: rallying point against foreign forces. In 1920, rebels intent on kicking out the British troops who occupied the region gathered at the mosque and readied for revolt. Among their leaders was Mohammed al-Sadr - the scion of a prominent Shiite family and a future prime minister.
BUSINESS
By KENNETH HARNEY | August 15, 2004
FOR HOMEOWNERS, it is the ultimate nightmare: You lose a job or fall seriously ill. You no longer have the money needed to pay the monthly mortgage. Your lender asks what's going on and demands that you pay up, pronto. Suddenly, you are on the icy downward slide to default, foreclosure and loss of your home, your equity and your credit standing. Thousands of American homeowners experience this nightmare every year, but a new, groundbreaking study documents an important countertrend: More than half of homeowners who fall behind on payments on loans owned or insured by the three largest participants in the mortgage market are being offered financial rescue plans designed to save them from the horrors of foreclosure.
FEATURES
By Noel Holston and Noel Holston,NEWSDAY | July 28, 2004
Between the ages of 16 and about 24, many young Amish men and women are allowed, even encouraged, to leave their cloistered communities and spend time in the outside world, testing their faith and values against the temptations of Anheuser-Busch, Old Navy and Girls Gone Wild. It's a rite of passage known as rumspringa, Pennsylvania Dutch for "running around" or "running wild." Some Amish youths treat the rite like a seeker's sabbatical. Some simply find themselves a mobile home to rent out of sight of their families and proceed to consume large quantities of beer, like Coneheads.
NEWS
By MICHAEL TACKETT and MICHAEL TACKETT,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | December 19, 2005
WASHINGTON -- In the past five years, Americans have seen President Bush in many poses: tough, defiant, emotional. Last night, in a rare Oval Office address, they saw another: humble. A president loath to concede mistakes did so. A president often dismissive of his critics embraced their right to differ. A president whose patience is easily stretched seemed to ask for empathy from others for decisions gone wrong. While there was no substantive shift about the war in Iraq during his prime-time speech, there were stylistic ones.
SPORTS
By Phil Jackman | February 20, 1991
Reading time, two minutes: It is now clear who is running the Orioles -- stand up and take a bow, Ron Shapiro -- as the club moves to humor Jim Palmer and truck him down to spring training for a look-see. While Jimbo hasn't pitched in six years, has been less than impressive tossing the ball around down south and is already damaged goods (sore elbow and blisters), 10 percenter Shapiro reveals the only sticking point right now is the pitcher's salary should he make the club. Think of it fans, Palmer spouting analysis over Channel 2 as he attempts to wriggle off a none-out bases-loaded hook.
BUSINESS
June 10, 2001
Dear Mr. Azrael, I am currently in a forbearance plan with my mortgage company. My forbearance occurred a few years ago [and] I now owe over $8,700 in interest arrearage. In addition, my interest rate is at 10 percent. I'm now in the position to repay the $8,700 arrearage, but I want to know should I pursue inquiring of a lower rate interest from my mortgage company, or go elsewhere. What options do you suggest? Sherman Moore Pikesville Dear Mr. Moore, Any time a borrower wants to refinance an existing mortgage it's usually a good idea to check with the existing lender to see if it will offer a lower rate.
NEWS
By Kathy Lally and Kathy Lally,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | May 29, 1998
MOSCOW -- With the ruble strengthening and stock prices rising yesterday, the latest Russian economic crisis began to subside. Ordinary citizens returned to what they do best -- persevering and hoping for the best.Some, however, were wondering how long that forbearance could last."The economic situation is very critical," said Ludmilla Telen, deputy editor of Moscow News. "And what is the government doing? They're calling out the firemen and putting out another fire. [Prime Minister Sergei]
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.