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By Kurt Streeter and Kurt Streeter,SUN STAFF | December 14, 1999
Rape charges against Brian J. Carcaterra, an All-America lacrosse goalie for Johns Hopkins, were dropped yesterday by city prosecutors."After a thorough look at the facts, we have decided there is insufficient evidence to proceed," said Francine Stokes, spokeswoman for the state's attorneys office, which brought the case.Carcaterra, 22, a senior political science major from Yorktown Heights, N.Y., was arrested Sept. 20 and charged with second-degree rape and second-degree assault for an incident involving a female student at an off-campus apartment.
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NEWS
November 22, 2013
Governor O'Malley's first 2016 presidential ad, “Belief”, debuted at the New Hampshire Democrats' Jefferson-Jackson Dinner last weekend.  The video played fast and loose with the truth, and both Change Maryland and Fox 45 fact checked the claims made in the ad. With the help of our multiple Mobbie-nominated friend Jim Jamitis, aka @anthropocon, we did our own VH1-style fact check of the governor. Enjoy.  --Mark Newgent Red Maryland has strived to be the premier blog and radio network of conservative and Republican politics and ideas in the free state since 2007.
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SPORTS
By JOHN STEADMAN | March 31, 1995
Those demons of torment deep within the psyche of Steve Stonebreaker drove him to a fatal decision.Stonebreaker, a former Baltimore Colts' linebacker, died at age 56 this week when he was found inside a locked garage with his head cushioned on a pillow near an automobile exhaust pipe in Metarie, La.The coroner's investigator, Joseph Donovan, of Jefferson Parish, said "everything is consistent with suicide."Life, at best, offers a turbulent ride, and it was much that way for a man who put up a bold front and loved to laugh and get caught up in a crowd.
NEWS
Bob Ehrlich | April 21, 2013
A dangerous confluence of recent business stories have been attention grabbers. First, the Obama administration announced an initiative to ensure more home loans for those with weak credit. Then, a number of prominent economists issued forecasts reflecting a slowing economy over the next several quarters. For the public, it's déjà vu all over again: an all-knowing federal government again pushing its way into the housing market against the backdrop of a softening economy. Yet again, we hear calls for banks to facilitate more home loans to mortgage seekers with less-than-stellar credit.
NEWS
By DAN BERGER | April 15, 1993
This will be a good town if they don't shoot it all up.Gilman School just won its first Pulitzer Prize in Music. It has never won the Pulitzer for football.Cheer up. Moscow is holding its first political show trial in years.Bill is going to get tough with Japan on trade. But not till after he has installed all the new communications gadgetry in the White House.May all Bill's forays prove half so easy in Congress as his first budget.
BUSINESS
By David Streitfeld and David Streitfeld,LOS ANGELES TIMES | April 10, 2005
SAN FRANCISCO - The only thing better than making a lot of money is doing so effortlessly. A variety of middlemen have sprung up to relieve real estate novices of the burden of doing anything besides forking over a wad of cash. They'll find the property. Suggest a mortgage lender. Arrange for a management company to find tenants. And repeat, over and over and over, what a smart thing it is to be doing this. Mile High Capital Group, a Denver firm, has been making repeated forays into California to sell duplexes it plans to build in Colorado, Florida and North Carolina.
BUSINESS
By Andrew Ratner and Andrew Ratner,SUN STAFF | July 25, 2003
Maybe simple is better. Sylvan Learning Systems Inc. shares gained 6 percent on the Nasdaq stock market and traded heavily yesterday after the Baltimore education company announced another step toward simplifying itself. The company said it will sell its Wall Street Institute, an international franchise that tutors adults in English, to continue its wholesale shift to higher education from Sylvan's former grade-school tutoring roots. Earlier this year, Sylvan announced the largest makeover in its history, selling off the tutoring centers that made the company a household name, to help free itself from a complex, and money-losing, venture capital arrangement.
NEWS
By Jean Marbella and Jean Marbella,Staff Writer | December 12, 1992
Not to alarm anybody, but there was a sighting of an elusive purple beast on Route 40 yesterday morning."Omigod! Where did you get that?" an employee at a Toys R Us store was heard to exclaim when a colleague wandered out of a storeroom clutching a stuffed Barney dinosaur. "Those are rare. We got them maybe twice this summer, and that was all."Of course, by the time you rush out there -- you who have your Barneys on back-order or have come up empty-handed on various toy store forays -- he might already be, as the young and the hip now say, Audi (translation: "outta here, history")
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | August 14, 2003
KABUL, Afghanistan - In the most violent day in Afghanistan in nearly a year, 15 people, including six children, were killed yesterday when a bomb exploded on their bus in southern Afghanistan and at least 40 people were killed in fighting in the country's east and south. The bomb exploded in Helmand province aboard a bus headed for the provincial capital, Lashkar Gah, according to wire reports. It was the deadliest such attack since a bomb exploded in Kabul in September, killing 35 people.
FEATURES
By Knight-Ridder News Service | April 15, 1993
No wonder they've made eight or nine movies out of "Huckleberry Finn." Mark Twain's novel deals with that most American of themes.Justice? Freedom? Truth? No."Huckleberry Finn" is about running away, and running away is as American as:"The Catcher in the Rye," "On the Road," "Route 66," "Alice Doesn't Live Here Anymore," "The Glass Menagerie" and the late Del Shannon walking along, wondering what went wrong, a-run-run-run-run-runaway.We are a nation of runaways, from the Pilgrims to the pioneers to the Underground Railroad to Ellis Island to the boat people.
SPORTS
By Edward Lee, The Baltimore Sun | January 11, 2012
That they don't have the best postseason reputation is not lost on the Ravens. The franchise is 9-6 in the playoffs, and four of those victories occurred during the team's magical run to win Super Bowl XXXV to cap the 2000 season. The Ravens are the only club in the NFL to have qualified for the postseason in each of the past four years, but don't have a Super Bowl or AFC championship title and just one AFC North crown to show for their labor. "You don't want to be the team that just has an 18-game season every year," outside linebacker Jarret Johnson said recently.
SPORTS
By Edward Lee | November 25, 2011
There were many reasons why Dennis Pitta's first touchdown catch of his young career will be special. Not only did the tight end's eight-yard catch come against a San Francisco 49ers ranked first in the NFL in fewest points allowed, but it also broke a 6-6 tie en route to the Ravens' eventual 16-6 victory at M&T Bank Stadium Thursday night. “It was a lot of fun, and it was nice to get it at such a critical point in the game,” said Pitta, who finished with two receptions for 19 yards.
BUSINESS
By Tanika White and Tanika White,Sun reporter | March 7, 2008
Beginning Monday, seniors can turn on their television sets and find AARP TV - programming aimed specifically at the 50 and older crowd. The newly formed AARP TV has joined forces with the Columbia-based senior's network, Retirement Living TV, to bring what it calls "smart programming to a grown up audience." New shows include My Generation, a lifestyles magazine, and Inside E Street, a public affairs program with a format somewhere between Meet The Press and Nightline. The launch of the two weekly shows, announced yesterday, marks the first time that AARP - the nation's largest membership organization for people over the age of 50 - has created its own original television programming.
NEWS
By Larry Carson | September 9, 2007
Glenwood in western Howard County is generally seen as a Republican stronghold, where voters elected last year the county's only GOP state senator, two Republican delegates and the party's only County Council member. But County Executive Ken Ulman, a liberal Democrat from Columbia, got a friendly reception from the nonpartisan Glenwood Lions Club on Thursday night. He used the occasion to expound on his ambitions for the county, and he used the 30 people gathered at the new county-built community center there as an impromptu focus group on the idea of an Erickson retirement community being built at Doughoregan Manor, the historic Carroll family estate in western Ellicott City.
BUSINESS
By Charlotte Observer | April 24, 2007
CHARLOTTE, N.C. -- Bank of America Corp.'s $21 billion gamble on Chicago received a tepid reception yesterday from some analysts and investors worried about the bank's continued appetite for big deals. The Charlotte, N.C., bank confirmed an agreement to buy Chicago's LaSalle Bank from Dutch parent ABN Amro Holding, which is being acquired itself by Britain's Barclays PLC for $91 billion. The takeover would give Bank of America the top spot in the nation's third-biggest city and would also make it the largest player in struggling Detroit.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | January 25, 2007
BAGHDAD, Iraq -- In the battle for Baghdad, Haifa Street has changed hands so often that it has taken on the feel of a no man's land, the deadly space between opposing trenches. As American and Iraqi troops poured in yesterday, the street showed why it is such a sensitive gauge of an urban conflict marked by front lines that melt into confusion, enemies with no clear identity and allies who disappear or do not show up at all. In a miniature version of the troop increase that the United States hopes will secure the city, American soldiers and armored vehicles raced onto Haifa Street before dawn to dislodge Sunni insurgents and Shiite militias that have been battling for a stretch of ragged slums and mostly abandoned high-rises.
NEWS
By GREGORY D. FOSTER | April 26, 2006
The American public is being lulled into a false sense of insecurity. And insecurity, constructed or real, is what gives those in power - our purported protectors - their self-righteous aura of indispensability. President Bush; Defense Secretary Donald H. Rumsfeld; the chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, Gen. Peter Pace; the head of the U.S. Central Command, Gen. John P. Abizaid; and the recently released Quadrennial Defense Review, among other authoritative purveyors of received wisdom, all warn us that we're embroiled in - and destined to be further subjected to - what is to be known as a Long War. It would be one thing if such semantic legerdemain reflected revelatory strategic insight or a more sophisticated appreciation of the intrinsic nature of postmodern conflicts and enemies.
SPORTS
By Phil Jackman | December 6, 1993
EAST RUTHERFORD, N.J. -- If he heard it once, he heard it maybe a hundred times after his field-goal attempt had gone exactly where he directed it, staying wide right and giving the game to Army, 16-14.Navy freshman Ryan Bucchianeri, looking the part of a person entering shock, was told by his coach George Chaump, "Don't let it wear on you. You did your best. A game is not won or lost on one play."These words and others from teammates and even some Army players probably helped -- but only momentarily.
NEWS
By Edmund Sanders and Edmund Sanders,Los Angeles Times | December 29, 2006
ADDIS ABABA, Ethiopia -- The headline in an Ethiopian newspaper drew familiar, if unflattering, comparisons to another nation's premature declaration of victory in a war abroad. "Mission Accomplished," blared Addis Ababa's Daily Monitor in an article about Ethiopian forces' triumph over Somali Islamists this week. In 2003 the same phrase adorned a banner behind President Bush as he declared an end to major combat operations in Iraq. The battles and bloodshed proved far from over. Just as the Iraq invasion has divided Americans, Ethiopians are split on their government's decision to get involved in Somalia's brewing civil war by sending troops across the border.
NEWS
By GREGORY D. FOSTER | April 26, 2006
The American public is being lulled into a false sense of insecurity. And insecurity, constructed or real, is what gives those in power - our purported protectors - their self-righteous aura of indispensability. President Bush; Defense Secretary Donald H. Rumsfeld; the chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, Gen. Peter Pace; the head of the U.S. Central Command, Gen. John P. Abizaid; and the recently released Quadrennial Defense Review, among other authoritative purveyors of received wisdom, all warn us that we're embroiled in - and destined to be further subjected to - what is to be known as a Long War. It would be one thing if such semantic legerdemain reflected revelatory strategic insight or a more sophisticated appreciation of the intrinsic nature of postmodern conflicts and enemies.
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