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BUSINESS
By Laura Smitherman and Laura Smitherman,Sun reporter | March 7, 2007
A House of Delegates panel considered yesterday legislation that would allow for-profit companies to provide credit counseling in the state, opening up an industry tarnished by AmeriDebt Inc., a Maryland nonprofit accused of bilking debt-strapped consumers of millions of dollars. Consumer advocates say the legislation could allow for-profit companies that have been accused of gouging consumers with deceptive sales practices to set up shop in the state. Many of the nonprofit entities that have been investigated by state and federal regulators and by the Internal Revenue Service are affiliated with for-profit companies.
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NEWS
By Bruce Hull and Maggie Cohen | September 18, 2014
The University of Maryland University College (UMUC) is in crisis with declining student numbers. The challenge has accelerated in the last few years, and enrollments are projected to drop another 6.5 percent this fall, greatly due to competition from "for-profit" universities and a loss of military students. Unfortunately, UMUC's long term response to this challenge has led the institution to weaken its educational standards and imitate for-profit rivals. This is seen in UMUC's 5-year campaign to make student work less costly and less difficult, reducing the distance learning term from 12 to eight weeks, jettisoning peer-reviewed textbooks in favor of a hodgepodge of Internet resources, abolishing proctored exams, allowing substantially more credits to be earned through demonstrated student "competencies," promoting classroom credit for student "life experiences," and replacing final exams with "class projects.
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NEWS
By John Fairhall and John Fairhall,Sun Staff Writer | January 24, 1995
Blue Cross and Blue Shield of Maryland's ambitious strategy for regional growth was derailed yesterday when the state insurance commissioner rejected the company's plan to sell stock and reorganize.Blue Cross contended that its plan would have benefited policyholders by making the company more efficient and financially sound, but Insurance Commissioner Dwight K. Bartlett III said it would have violated state law that created Blue Cross in 1937 as a nonprofit insurer.The plan would have made "profit-making the dominant motivation" of Blue Cross, said Mr. Bartlett, who essentially gave the company this choice: You can be for-profit or nonprofit, but not both.
NEWS
By Kat Hyland | July 14, 2014
How competent is your 18-year old? Do you trust him or her with your credit card? How about the brand new family car? Better yet, do you think he is competent enough to take out several thousands of dollars of debt with a few pen strokes? Education has long enjoyed a prominent status as the keystone in the archway to American success. What supports this idea is the concept that the barriers to higher education are surmountable, and that people who cannot afford to pay for school out of pocket can borrow money as an investment toward their future.
BUSINESS
By M. William Salganik and M. William Salganik,SUN STAFF | July 16, 2004
In another defeat for a Blue Cross plan seeking to switch to for-profit operation, the insurance commissioner in the state of Washington yesterday rejected a for-profit conversion proposed by Premera Blue Cross. Maryland's CareFirst BlueCross BlueShield had its controversial plan to become a for-profit blocked 16 months ago. Since then, the Kansas Supreme Court upheld that state's earlier rejection of a conversion, Blue Cross and Blue Shield of North Carolina withdrew its conversion application, and Horizon Blue Cross and Blue Shield of New Jersey announced it was dropping its exploration of conversion.
NEWS
By Michael Hill and Michael Hill,SUN STAFF | July 11, 2001
University of Maryland, University College's ballyhooed move into the dot-com business has been put on hold, but school officials blame the delay on federal regulations, not on the virtual collapse of the online economy. It was 18 months ago that the state's 50-year-old continuing education school announced plans for a for-profit company that would market its fast-growing Internet courses. UMUC President Gerald Heeger said he had encouraging talks with venture capitalists about funding the company, but U.S. Department of Education (DOE)
BUSINESS
By David Conn and David Conn,Sun Staff Writer | March 30, 1995
Blue Cross and Blue Shield of Maryland still wants to turn for-profit and sell stock to the public, but yesterday the company and lawmakers threw in the towel for this year.Legislative leaders and Blue Cross executives announced that with less than two weeks left in this session of the General Assembly, it's too late to consider the complicated plan that Maryland's largest health insurer said it needs to compete better in the future."We felt at the end of the session it was too much for the legislature to take up with a thorough discussion," said Del. Michael E. Busch, an Anne Arundel Democrat who chairs the House Economic Matters Committee.
NEWS
By Martha Woodall and Martha Woodall,KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | August 28, 2001
PHILADELPHIA - Edison Schools Inc., a controversial for-profit education company, loses money. The company says it can become profitable if it increases the number of public schools it manages. Philadelphia may be about to give Edison that opportunity. Pennsylvania Gov. Tom Ridge has hired the company to study the Philadelphia School District and devise a plan for improving its academics and finances. And in two months, Ridge will decide whether this firm, with which he has political ties, should manage some or all of the Philadelphia public schools.
NEWS
By M. William Salganik and M. William Salganik,SUN STAFF | May 5, 2004
A decade ago, the Blue Cross and Blue Shield Association broke with a nonprofit tradition dating from the Depression and allowed member Blues plans to convert to for-profit businesses. That touched off a cascade. By the time Maryland-based CareFirst BlueCross BlueShield announced its intention to go for-profit in 2001, more than a dozen Blues had converted on their own or been snapped up by growing national companies. Suddenly, in place of a cascade, there isn't even a trickle. Regulators turned thumbs-down on conversions and sales in Kansas and Maryland.
NEWS
By Michael Hill and Michael Hill,SUN STAFF | December 4, 1999
The University System of Maryland is going into the "dot com" business. The Board of Regents yesterday gave the University of Maryland, University College approval to establish a for-profit company to market its Internet courses out of state and overseas, trying to tap into the growing Web-based education market. "I think this may be one of the most significant actions the Board of Regents has ever taken," said Donald N. Langenberg, USM chancellor. "It's an unusual step for a public institution, in Maryland or anywhere else, that gives the state the potential, through University College, to become a major player in an absolutely huge global market," Langenberg said.
NEWS
June 30, 2014
In recognizing that for-profit corporations like Hobby Lobby can hold religious beliefs that trump secular laws like the Affordable Care Act's requirement that women have access to contraceptives without out-of-pocket costs, the Supreme Court has moved the nation in an unwelcome direction. Differentiating between religious organizations and private companies used to be a straightforward matter (and a practice dating back to English common law), but now that distinction is no longer so clear.
EXPLORE
September 30, 2013
Whether it's making gourmet jams or jellies, baking bread and cakes, catering festive events or creating and packaging special dinners for one, food related businesses are becoming increasingly popular as a way to earn a living (or to add to your income). The cook's creative flair, combined with business practicality, will succeed even in tough economic times, if the enterprise is given the appropriate research and planning before its launch. University of Maryland Extension's Food for Profit workshop takes its "students" step by step through the information necessary to start and run a small food product business.
NEWS
July 3, 2013
As travelers who enjoy a cruise as one kind of lovely vacation, my family is certain now never to cruise with Carnival Cruise Lines - not because the line will move to Tampa, Fla., in 2014, but because of its leadership's sadly narrow perspective on how to preserve their profits at the cost of endangering our seas and coastal areas ("Carnival has plans to ship out of port," June 28). Knowing that Carnival continues to haggle with the EPA over implementing standards to reduce air pollution, it would be unconscionable for an informed traveler to even consider voyaging with Carnival Cruise Lines.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Chris Kaltenbach, The Baltimore Sun | May 16, 2013
Baltimore's Edgar Allan Poe House and Museum should reopen Oct. 4, the group responsible for making it profitable announced this week. "That's the official goal. That's the date," said Baltimore-based actor and author Mark Redfield, vice president of Poe Baltimore. "Things are coming along. " Tentative plans call for the house to be open weekends until spring 2014, when hours would be expanded. Final details are still being developed, Redfield said, but plans call for a museum that will be similar to what had been available to visitors before the closing of the house in September 2012.
SPORTS
By Ian Duncan, The Baltimore Sun | February 1, 2013
As the Ravens get ready to take on the 49ers in New Orleans, officials back home are preparing to deal with what they hope will be a joyful - but not too rowdy - Super Bowl night. Baltimore police have extensive plans, including mounted patrols, helicopter and camera surveillance downtown, as well as in Fells Point, Federal Hill and Canton, spokesman Anthony Guglielmi said. Police hope to keep people safe while they have a good time. "Come to the city, celebrate the victory," he said, but to avoid traffic, "come early.
NEWS
July 20, 2012
In his recent op-ed, Professor James Burdick of Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine writes that the Supreme Court's decision to uphold the ACA was a step toward universal care for all ("Universal care on the horizon," July 13). However, I find this assertion ironic because we are now further entrenched in a market system that does not embrace the idea of health care as a right. Dr. Burdick claims the inevitability of universal care, stating that partisan arguments will have to subside and that ultimately, the ACA reduces costs through cutting over-utilization.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | May 4, 1997
It sounds like an old-fashioned Hollywood movie. A dedicated couple start a boarding school for autistic children in a faded mansion in rural Delaware. Struggling to make ends meet, they pool their personal resources to buy a racehorse named Silk Stockings. The filly not only wins thousands but also makes harness-racing history, all for the sake of the children.That is the way the story of the Au Clair School was told in the mid-1970s, in television features and news articles across the country.
NEWS
By Dana Hedgpeth and Dana Hedgpeth,SUN STAFF | February 17, 1998
Officials seeking a partner for Howard County General Hospital say they have eliminated a for-profit suitor, easing the concerns of many in the community.In their first large public meeting on the search for a larger health care conglomerate, the hospital's two main leaders -- Alton J. Scavo, chairman of the board and Victor A. Broccolino, president -- spoke to more than 100 community leaders, residents and hospital staff members Saturday at the county's Board of Education headquarters."We are narrowing it down to two institutions, and I can tell you that a for-profit entity is not an alternative," said Scavo, who noted there are now three contenders.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare, The Baltimore Sun | March 8, 2012
A Towson attorney has filed suit to prevent Sheppard Pratt Health System from opening a residential group home in his Ruxton neighborhood, and is demanding that the state rescind a license recently issued for the facility. Thomas C. Costello claims the home is a "for-profit, commercial enterprise," a use forbidden by state law in an established neighborhood and one that violates Baltimore County's zoning code. He has asked the court to void a state license granted in January for the home at 1506 LaBelle Ave., which would house up to six people transitioning from hospital treatment programs for depression and anxiety.
NEWS
By Childs Walker, The Baltimore Sun | December 29, 2011
Baltimore International College is set to hand over control of its operations to Virginia's Stratford University after restructuring its debt and receiving approval from the required accrediting agencies. The downtown culinary college held its final graduation Dec. 10 and will officially become a branch of Stratford on Jan. 1. Baltimore International students will be able to continue their classes at Stratford in January, and the branch will begin admitting new students in February.
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