Advertisement
HomeCollectionsFop
IN THE NEWS

Fop

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
By TaNoah Morgan and TaNoah Morgan,SUN STAFF | December 30, 1996
The beleaguered Fraternal Order of Police is fighting back against efforts by the Teamsters to represent Anne Arundel County police officers.A member of the union representing more than 400 county police officers has asked for a criminal investigation of three members who support the Teamsters, and the local FOP leadership has begun proceedings to oust those officers and two others from the union. In a countermove, the five officers have threatened to sue the FOP for libel, charging that the union's accusations have scarred their reputations with fellow officers.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By Alison Knezevich, The Baltimore Sun | June 2, 2014
A nearly $1.7 million payment from Baltimore County to the police union to resolve a battle over retiree health care costs included about $228,000 in interest accrued while the county fought court rulings in the case. The county wrote a check last week to the Baltimore County Fraternal Order of Police Lodge No. 4 to reimburse more than 400 retirees who the state's highest court determined were overcharged for health insurance premiums. The dispute began seven years ago, eventually reaching the Maryland Court of Appeals in 2012.
Advertisement
NEWS
By TaNoah Morgan and TaNoah Morgan,SUN STAFF | February 12, 1997
Rank and file county police voted narrowly yesterday to keep the Fraternal Order of Police as their bargaining union, ending a nine-month struggle between that union and the Teamsters.But the Teamsters did win a landslide 26-4 victory to represent sheriff's deputies.More than 75 percent of eligible officers turned out to vote at police headquarters, giving the once-beleaguered FOP a 178-175 victory.With its win, the union that has represented county law enforcement officers for 27 years flexed muscle that it hopes will win the officers pay raises and better benefits this year at the bargaining table.
NEWS
By Alison Knezevich, The Baltimore Sun | November 7, 2013
A court has ordered Baltimore County to reduce the health insurance premiums it charges hundreds of retired police officers. Baltimore County Circuit Judge Michael J. Finifter gave the county 10 days to comply with the order. The ruling is the latest in the legal dispute between the Baltimore County Fraternal Order of Police Lodge No. 4 and the county government over what proportion of the retirees' health insurance premiums the county pays. A county spokeswoman said Thursday the county's attorneys are reviewing the order, but declined to comment further.
NEWS
By TaNoah Morgan and TaNoah Morgan,SUN STAFF | January 20, 2000
The Fraternal Order of Police (FOP) retained its role as bargaining agent for Anne Arundel County police officers in an election yesterday, turning back an aggressive challenge by the Teamsters Union. Lodge 70 of the FOP, which has represented county officers for 30 years, won by a vote of 226-192 in its second head-to-head battle with the Teamsters. It was a wider margin than its three-vote victory in fall 1997. Detective Ricardo Hawkins, first vice president of Lodge 70, attributed yesterday's victory to promises of change in the FOP unit and its recent collaboration with another labor organization, the International Union of Police Associations (IUPA)
NEWS
By TaNoah Morgan and TaNoah Morgan,SUN STAFF | January 19, 2000
In the second contest in a little more than a month, the Fraternal Order of Police and the Teamsters Union will square off today in a runoff election that will decide on a bargaining unit for about 550 Anne Arundel County police officers. The winner will get a two-year contract to negotiate with county officials for officers' pay and benefits, and to represent the police in grievances. Officers will vote between 7 a.m. and 5: 30 p.m. at the county's fire training academy in Millersville.
NEWS
By TaNoah Morgan and TaNoah Morgan,SUN STAFF | January 15, 1997
The Teamsters union gained a little breathing room yesterday in its effort to displace the Fraternal Order of Police as the bargaining agent for police officers and deputy sheriffs.In complicated wrangling, county lawyers agreed yesterday to delay negotiations with the FOP that could have effectively shut out the Teamsters. The delay gives the Teamsters a chance to argue in court for an election in which the law enforcement officers would choose between the two unions.Anne Arundel Circuit Judge Martin A. Wolff said he would hold a hearing Tuesday on the Teamsters' contention that the next step should be an election.
NEWS
By Tanya Jones and Tanya Jones,SUN STAFF | January 9, 1997
Members of the local police union voted Tuesday night to permit a third party to run elections that would allow its members to choose between their longtime representative, the Fraternal Order of Police, and the Teamsters.Teamster supporters and County Attorney Phillip F. Scheibe say the vote seems to clear the way for an election.The vote came at a heavily attended meeting at the Fraternal Order of Police Lodge 70 in Crownsville.The majority of the approximately 120 current and former police officers present also voted to dismiss charges of violating union bylaws that had been leveled against five members.
NEWS
By Amy Oakes and Amy Oakes,SUN STAFF | December 16, 1999
Anne Arundel County police officers went to the polls yesterday to choose a bargaining agent for their contract negotiations, but the best they could do was eliminate one of the three candidates.A runoff between the Teamsters union and the Fraternal Order of Police, which has represented county police for 30 years, will probably be held after the first of the year, a county official said.The Teamsters garnered the most votes with 188, but were eight short of the majority needed to be declared victorious.
NEWS
By Scott Wilson and Scott Wilson,SUN STAFF | May 31, 1996
Just days after the County Council killed almost all of their contract requests for the coming year, members of Anne Arundel's largest police union wonder whether the battered bargaining unit is too weak to survive.What is emerging is a power struggle within the 500-member Fraternal Order of Police, Lodge 70. The result could be the end of the union that has represented Anne Arundel's front-line police officers for 26 years.One faction, comprising roughly 65 members, wants to dissolve the police union and join the resurgent International Brotherhood of Teamsters -- historically a symbol of organized labor's influence and excesses.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | August 16, 2013
Richard A. "Dick" Simmons, a retired Baltimore police officer who was a founder and first president of the Baltimore City Fraternal Order of Police Lodge 3, died Tuesday of complications from an aneurysm at the University of Maryland Medical Center. He was 84. Mr. Simmons was born and raised in Chicago, where he graduated from high school. "Because of the Depression, his parents couldn't afford to keep him, and when he was 4 years old they placed him in Lawrence Hall, a home for boys that was run by an Episcopal priest," said his daughter, Janet Embleton of Franklin, W.Va.
NEWS
By Julie Scharper, The Baltimore Sun | November 11, 2010
The Baltimore police union voted overwhelmingly Thursday to reject a one-year contract that would have reduced wages by nearly 2 percent in exchange for five additional vacation days. Ninety-five percent of the members of the Fraternal Order of Police voted against the proposal; they were angered by pay cuts coming on the heels of an overhaul of the public safety pension system implemented by Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake, union president Robert F. Cherry said. "It's not just a rejection of the city's best offer," said Cherry.
NEWS
By Annie Linskey and Annie Linskey,Sun Reporter | May 28, 2008
Maryland Transportation Authority Police are conducting an internal investigation of a civilian employee who has been accused of misconduct while working a separate job as a bartender at Baltimore's Fraternal Order of Police Lodge, said MdTA police Chief Marcus Brown. The employee is a retired city officer who performs background checks for prospective MdTA officers. "It is a personnel issue," Brown said in a telephone interview. "In any case that we receive an allegation of misconduct, we'll be doing an administrative inquiry.
NEWS
By Sumathi Reddy and Sumathi Reddy,Sun Reporter | July 25, 2007
Taking a stance against the city's top two leaders, Baltimore's police union yesterday officially threw its support behind two of their challengers: Keiffer J. Mitchell Jr. for mayor and Michael Sarbanes for City Council president. At a news conference at its headquarters, the Fraternal Order of Police Lodge 3 presented Mitchell, a councilman, with a $3,000 campaign contribution, and said that 100 officers will volunteer on his campaign, waving signs and knocking on doors when they are off duty.
NEWS
By Sumathi Reddy and Sumathi Reddy,Sun reporter | July 24, 2007
Baltimore's powerful police union voted unanimously last night to endorse City Councilman Keiffer J. Mitchell Jr. for mayor, sending Mayor Sheila Dixon a strong message that the city's rank and file is dissatisfied with her policing decisions. The Fraternal Order of Police Lodge 3 also voted last night to endorse Michael Sarbanes, a longtime civic activist, for City Council president, choosing him over current Council President Stephanie C. Rawlings-Blake. The endorsements are to be announced at a news conference at 11 a.m. today at the FOP Lodge in Hampden.
NEWS
By Nick Shields and Nick Shields,sun reporter | May 3, 2007
Two men, at least one of them carrying a shotgun, chose an unlikely target yesterday for a robbery: a Baltimore County restaurant that happens to be next door to a Fraternal Order of Police lodge. One employee of the Bowman Restaurant and Pub escaped and ran to the FOP lodge, where a retired county police officer quickly called 911. Officers descended upon the restaurant within minutes and sent a tactical squad inside on the chance that at least one robber might have been inside. Both robbers got away, leaving a cardboard box with dollar bills on the ground behind the restaurant, police said.
NEWS
By Peter Hermann and Peter Hermann,SUN STAFF Sun staff writer JoAnna Daemmrich contributed to this article | March 7, 1997
A city councilwoman is demanding an apology from the head of the police union after he reportedly called her an obscenity last night outside a City Hall hearing on alleged racism in the Police Department.Councilwoman Sheila Dixon, who was told of the alleged remark by police spokesman Sam Ringgold after the hearing, said she would seek Officer Gary McLhinney's banishment from the City Council hearing room if an apology is not forthcoming.But McLhinney, who said he was offended by Dixon's comments linking racism and the Fraternal Order of Police, denied making the disparaging statement and accused the city police spokesman of spreading "bold-faced lies."
NEWS
By Devon Spurgeon and Devon Spurgeon,SUN STAFF | August 18, 1999
Thirty Anne Arundel County police officers are handing out leaflets and organizing meetings to persuade their fellow officers to abandon the Fraternal Order of Police and let the Teamsters represent them in contract negotiations with the county.The effort -- dubbed "Operation Second Chance" -- began this week with organizers placing leaflets singing the praises of the International Brotherhood of Teamsters Local 103 in mailboxes late at night."One of the biggest benefits of the Teamsters is that when an issue surfaces within our bargaining unit, a professional from Local 103 addresses the issue with the Chief, County or press, not a fellow police officer who may be subjected to coercion from management," said the letter signed by the Anne Arundel County Police Officers Teamsters Organizing Committee.
NEWS
By Andrew A. Green and Andrew A. Green,Sun Reporter | April 3, 2007
The Fraternal Order of Police has dropped its objections to a bill that would automatically expunge the criminal records of those who are arrested but not charged with a crime, Senate leaders said, removing some of the strongest reservations about the measure in the General Assembly. The FOP had opposed a provision of the bill that would have made it easier for people to sue the police over such arrests. Under current law, those who are arrested but not charged can petition for expungement, but to do so they must either sign a waiver promising not to sue the police for false arrest or other claims arising from the incident, or wait three years, when the statute of limitations for such actions expires.
NEWS
By Doug Donovan and Doug Donovan,Sun reporter | November 3, 2006
The state police union demanded yesterday that Baltimore Mayor Martin O'Malley release his application to practice law to determine whether he properly disclosed a nearly 20-year-old drunken driving charge. Maryland Fraternal Order of Police President John "Rodney" Bartlett Jr. said in a statement that O'Malley's refusal to release the document raises questions about the mayor's ethics and moral character. "Mr. O'Malley refuses to release a copy of his bar application, leading to the inevitable conclusion that he failed to complete it honestly and properly," the statement said.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.