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NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel and Baltimore Sun reporter | February 12, 2010
Footprints in the snow led police officers to a man they believe had just broken into his neighbor's Glen Burnie home Wednesday morning, Anne Arundel County police spokesman Justin Mulcahy said. A 39-year-old woman heard glass break around 2:28 a.m. in her home in the 200 block of Queen Anne Road and went to investigate, he said. When she encountered a man, he ran out, Mulcahy said. Responding officers followed tracks in the snow to another house on the block, where they arrested a man who had wet clothes.
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BUSINESS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | June 16, 2014
Car-sharing company Zipcar has expanded quickly in its four years in Baltimore, scaling up from an initial fleet of 27 cars to more than 200 vehicles. The Boston-based company announced Monday the opening of a new office in Harbor East, next to a new on-street city bike corral. The company has more than doubled its workforce to seven employees, said spokeswoman Lindsay Wester, and expanded throughout the city from its beginnings around the Homewood campus of the Johns Hopkins University.
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NEWS
February 7, 1995
Police had no trouble finding two suspected Brooklyn Park vandals Saturday morning. They just followed the footprints in the snow.Shortly before 1:30 a.m., Officer William Bertram saw two youths tampering with a car at the Brooklyn Park Middle School lot in the 200 block of Hammonds Lane. Though the youths ran when Officer Bertram approached, they left a trail leading to a house in the 5600 block of Harbor Valley Drive, police said.Officer Bertram hopped the fence, knocked on the door and asked to search the house.
NEWS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | May 15, 2014
State officials approved the sale of a 346,000-square-foot pier in Canton to Rukert Terminals Corp., a private terminal operator with an established footprint in Baltimore shipping. The Clinton Street Marine Terminal, as "Pier 1" and its surrounding half-acre of property are known, was deemed surplus to the needs of the Maryland Port Administration earlier this year. The pier hasn't actively handled cargo since the 1980s, but remains in use to berth ships. The $2 million sale frees the port administration from maintenance costs at the rundown facility while keeping the valuable waterfront property tied to maritime industry, even as commercial "gentrification" in nearby Canton neighborhoods creeps ever closer, said Mike Miller, director of maritime commercial management for the port administration.
FEATURES
By Casi H. Clocker and Casi H. Clocker,Contributing Writer | May 29, 1992
Some schoolchildren think "AIDS are stupid," while others see AIDS as a job for the Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles.Students from Baltimore area schools used crayons, markers and colored pencils to express their feelings about AIDS on footprint-shapes that will guide and inspire an expected 10,000 walkers in AIDSWALK '92.On Sunday, participants in central Maryland's fifth annual event, which benefits AIDS service organizations, will follow the footprints for...
NEWS
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | December 26, 1995
Faced with a ravaged work of art -- a waterlogged fresco, a crumbling icon -- a restoration expert gingerly removes the layers of grime and repairs the damage, all to expose the artist's original creation.But when the artist is nature, and the damaged treasure is an accidental monument to humanity's early footsteps, conservators face unusually daunting challenges.The task at hand has been the painstaking preservation of a unique trail of footprints on an arid plain in Tanzania in East Africa, left 3.6 million years ago by humanity's earliest known ancestors.
NEWS
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | February 22, 1998
LANGEBAAN, South Africa -- The oldest known footprints of an anatomically modern human are in danger of destruction on the shores of a sparkling lagoon here after having been preserved by nature for 117,000 years.Scientists say the extraordinary pair of footprints, discovered in 1995 but not disclosed publicly until last year, have become so popular among barefoot beach-goers that the soft sandstone impressions may not last the South African summer.The threat to the rare prints has become so worrisome that the National Parks Board will meet tomorrow to consider removing them to a museum for safekeeping.
NEWS
By Edward Gunts and Edward Gunts,SUN ARCHITECTURE CRITIC | January 7, 2004
Two sunken reflecting pools will forever occupy the footprints of New York's collapsed World Trade Center towers - permanent reminders of the voids left by the terror attacks on Sept. 11, 2001. The Lower Manhattan Development Corp. announced yesterday that a design titled "Reflecting Absence," by architect Michael Arad and landscape architect Peter Walker, has been selected from 5,201 submissions in an international competition held to create a memorial to the victims. The memorial is one of the most anticipated features in the rebuilding of Lower Manhattan, along with a 1,776-foot-tall Freedom Tower whose shape will evoke the silhouette of the Statue of Liberty.
NEWS
By Justin Fenton and Justin Fenton,justin.fenton@baltsun.com | January 29, 2009
Sgt. Steve Olson only had to follow the footprints. With snow falling and few people out Tuesday night, whoever shot 23-year-old Jasmine Harris in the doorway of her family's West Baltimore home had left a clear trail. It twisted from the home, through an alley behind several houses, and up onto a porch on Gwynns Falls Parkway. It led to an area where a vehicle appeared to have pulled up, and then, right back to the crime scene in the 3000 block of Windsor Ave. There, standing on the corner, at the end of the footprints, was Kenneth R. Warren Jr. He was watching police response to the shooting.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,SUN STAFF | June 4, 1998
Ray Stanford's hobby is taking over his house.Hundreds, maybe thousands of rocks are heaped in knee-high windrows around his living room. Rock piles snake across the floor, under and over his furniture. Stacks of rocks have permanently usurped his kitchen stove."We don't even eat here, there are so many darn rocks in the house," Stanford said. His insurance company urged him to reinforce his floor beams. He did. But he won't get rid of the rocks.These rocks are pocked with footprints, traces of a lost world that flourished 105 million to 115 million years ago, during a time geologists call the Cretaceous period.
BUSINESS
By Natalie Sherman, The Baltimore Sun | January 17, 2014
The days of the cushy corner office for top law partners may be numbered. Maybe. On average, law firms still occupy up to three times the space per worker as companies in banking, finance, insurance and technology, according to a national study by commercial real estate broker Cushman & Wakefield. But with increasing pressure on firms to lower costs, that's expected to change, which has significant implications for office space in downtown Baltimore. Law firms occupy about 13 percent of Baltimore's top-tier office space, with many smaller firms leasing in older buildings, according to a 2013 report by commercial real estate firm Jones Lang LaSalle.
FEATURES
Laurel Peltier and Guest blogger | May 17, 2013
(An earlier version of this post included incorrect information about Maryland Gas & Electric, its pricing and whether it offers a "green" gas plan involving carbon offsets. The Sun regrets the errors.) ---------------- (Another in an occasional series of guest posts by GreenLaurel.com blogger Laurel Peltier) Marylanders have a choice in purchasing electricity for their homes to buy "green" power generated by wind turbines. They don't have as many options when it comes to natural gas for heating and cooking, but there is one company offering consumers a convenient if slightly pricier way to reduce the climate impact of their fuel choice -- through carbon offsets.
BUSINESS
By Steve Kilar, The Baltimore Sun | May 15, 2013
The Annapolis-based law firm Rifkin, Livingston, Levitan & Silver LLC has acquired and is merging with the Law Offices of Arnold M. Weiner, located in Baltimore. The merger will go into effect on July 1, according to a statement from the firms released Wednesday. After the merger, the firm will be called Rifkin, Weiner, Livingston, Levitan & Silver LLC. Alan M. Rifkin, managing partner of the firm, said that Rifkin, Livingston has been looking to re-establish a Baltimore office and this merger offered the right opportunity.
HEALTH
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | April 19, 2013
Description: Baltimore has a per-person "ecological footprint" that is 13 percent higher than that of the average American, according to a study of local consumption habits led by a researcher at Goucher College. The measure takes into account how large of an area would be needed to accommodate the city's waste and to secure the resources needed to do so. For all of Baltimore, the area is the combined size of West Virginia, Delaware and Rhode Island, the study found. The largest impacts come from traffic and electricity use, according to the research.
EXPLORE
February 11, 2013
There is a Maryland foundation whose purpose is to fund sacred places, green spaces that celebrate nature by creating verdant calm refuges tucked away from urban chaos. It seems CA proposes to do the opposite.  Our Symphony Woods is already a sacred place. So we have a responsibility to tread lightly, with small footprints, when we make it a public place. The last plan to create walkways through the trees, "Columbia's Central Park with a fountain," seemed to be an unobtrusive way to enjoy SW's exquisite trees.
NEWS
By Luke Broadwater, The Baltimore Sun | October 18, 2012
A Baltimore City Council committee on Thursday approved the sale of up to $35 million in bonds to help finance Under Armour's expansion of its Tide Point corporate headquarters. The Budget and Taxation Committee unanimously approved the sale of the bonds. The measure is to move to the full City Council on Monday. The council last month voted unanimously and without discussion to approve tax increment financing for the project. The deal allows the city to issue bonds to pay for infrastructure improvements on and around the waterfront campus.
NEWS
By Don Spatz | June 2, 1995
Fate Footprints in the sands of time May be left by those of renown; But it's wise that we remember They weren't made by sitting down.
HEALTH
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | August 24, 2012
Description: Two 110-million-year-old footprints that a massive plant-eating dinosaur and, perhaps, its offspring left behind has been uncovered on the campus of the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt. That age dates it to the Cretaceous Period, the last of the Mesozoic Era. NASA Goddard facilities officials are not revealing the exact location of the footprint but said it isn't going anywhere — moving it would violate laws protecting archaeological and paleontological artifacts found on federal lands.
SPORTS
By Grahame L. Jones, Tribune Newspapers | June 8, 2010
The scene Tuesday was a South African dairy farm an hour or so outside Johannesburg — about as incongruous a place as possible to be talking about the World Cup. But Jay DeMerit was undeterred. Neither the distinct aroma of cows nor the fact that there were chickens milling about outside the media tent would sway the U.S. defender from his appointed remarks. "I think, being Americans, we always have something to prove as far as far as soccer is concerned," he said. "We understand who we are, and we understand that there's still a long road.
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