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NEWS
By MICHAEL OLESKER | January 26, 1999
ROLLS RIGHT OFF the tongue, doesn't it: PSINet Stadium.Is it pronounced as one word, with the "p" running directly into the "s," as though you're about to whisper a secret to somebody? ("Pss, Artie, wanta hear a really bad name for a stadium? It's a psser, ain't it?")Is it intended that each letter be pronounced separately? (Careful if you're printing: It's a short stroke of the pen from PSI to PSL, and we don't want to go there, do we, Artie? Personal Seat License Stadium! Now there's a name with significance!
ARTICLES BY DATE
SPORTS
By Alexander Pyles and The Baltimore Sun | May 20, 2014
When building a stadium for high school sports, you apparently do not always get what you pay for. A $60 million stadium for high school football games in Allen, Texas, has been deemed unsafe by district officials, The Dallas Morning News reported Monday. That means games won't be played at Eagle Stadium during the 2014 season. The stadium was closed in February when engineers found concrete was cracking because of design deficiencies in the 18,000-seat venue. Several schools in the Baltimore metropolitan area have turf athletic fields -- which can cost around $1 million -- but that's a long way from what Texas voters approved in 2009.
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SPORTS
By Jon Morgan and Jon Morgan,Staff Writer | August 9, 1993
Bruce Hoffman has a problem any engineer would love: topping one of the nation's most critically acclaimed public construction projects.The executive director of the Maryland Stadium Authority will be a key figure in construction of the $150 million football stadium planned for downtown if Baltimore is awarded an NFL expansion team. And he's already feeling the pressure to top his last project: Oriole Park at Camden Yards."It's so hard to follow Camden Yards," he said. "We have to be creative, or everybody is going to think we fell asleep on the second one."
SPORTS
By Edward Lee, The Baltimore Sun | May 28, 2013
The time has come for the NCAA to return the championship weekend to smaller stadiums and venues. Seventh-seeded Duke's 16-10 rout of top-seeded Syracuse in Monday's tournament final at Lincoln Financial Field was marred by an announced attendance of 28,224 - the smallest crowd to watch a title game since championship weekend was moved to professional football stadiums for the 2003 campaign and since 2002. The weekend attendance of 79,179 (28,224 for the Division I final, 22,511 for the Division II and III finals on Sunday and 28,444 for the Division I semifinals on Saturday)
NEWS
February 1, 1996
THERE IS no better way to turn Maryland into a third-rate state than for the General Assembly to kill plans for a football stadium in Baltimore. It would entrench perceptions, warranted or not, that this state is anti-business.A new $200 million self-supporting stadium, using extra lottery funds as seed money, would bring jobs and growth and celebrity to this region. Count the ways: 4,600 construction jobs, 1,400 permanent full-time equivalent jobs, tax receipts of $9 million a year, total economic impact estimated at $111 million annually.
NEWS
March 10, 1996
LIKE A WELL-DRILLED football team, the coalition backing a football stadium for Baltimore's Camden Yards is marching steadily toward the goal line. This momentum is even pulling along a troubled companion deal -- a stadium in Landover for the Washington-area Redskins.Yet just as in football, there's no sure win in the General Assembly. Key votes in the Senate budget panel have been encouraging. Angry rhetoric this week will flow on the Senate floor from opponents. Sentiment, though, is swinging the other way: Lawmakers are recognizing the considerable economic, social and psychological benefits of these projects.
NEWS
February 4, 1996
SO FAR, the Great Stadium Debate in Annapolis has focused on the wrong issue. Instead of lawmakers bickering over fiscal analyses that come to different conclusions about the size of the tax benefit for Maryland, they should zero in on reasons why so many cities clamor for the right to become home to a National Football League team.Numerous intangibles flow from being an NFL city. It marks the town as first class. Business executives want to locate their companies in such a place. It greatly enhances the quality of life in an era when pro sports are a major part of our leisure-time existence.
NEWS
April 7, 1996
THE MOST DIFFICULT job for the designers of Baltimore's new football stadium? Following their own act.The baseball park that Kansas City-based HOK Sports Facilities Group designed at the north end of the Camden Yards complex several years ago didn't merely win universal acclaim; it changed the way the public envisions sports stadiums. Practically overnight, Oriole Park made cities and states wonder why they ever constructed cookie-cutter ballparks that resembled rejects from a spaceship factory.
NEWS
June 16, 1996
DEMAND A GREAT football stadium, Baltimore. Stay on top of the parties designing it. Make sure parking is not a headache, landscaping is not an afterthought and that a link can be forged at some point between the stadium and the Middle Branch waterfront.But delay by one year the 1998 scheduled opening? Nonsense.Postponing this project with no specific remedy -- if one is warranted -- would be a waste of time and money. The delay would cost $30 million in ticket sales to the Baltimore Ravens and in construction overruns to taxpayers, not to mention lost revenue to restaurants, hotels and other businesses counting on spinoff trade.
NEWS
August 10, 1996
COME THE final homestand of the Baltimore Orioles this season, if you aren't a season-ticket holder with a reserved parking pass your prospects of driving onto a stadium lot will be about the same as your chances of Davey Johnson wading into the stands to ask if you'd like to play shortstop in place of Cal Ripken. In other words: Zero.As construction commences for a football stadium at Camden Yards, 2,000-plus parking spaces used by the public for baseball games will be lost. Bruce Hoffman, executive director of the Maryland Stadium Authority, has been negotiating to lease hundreds of spaces at businesses across Russell Street to fill some of the gap. That short-term solution has its own problems, though, with hundreds of fans daring to cross the busy parkway at game time.
SPORTS
Sun Staff report | May 22, 2012
Under Armour has announced a new "community-based empowerment program" titled "WIN Baltimore," with its first initiative being the renovation of the football stadium at Dunbar. The Locust Point-based apparel company revealed the plans to Dunbar coaches, administrators and students Friday , in a ceremony that included company founder and CEO Kevin Plank and Ravens linebacker Ray Lewis. According to a news release sent this week, Under Armour will fund the construction of "a state-of-the-art turf football field with new stadium lights, a first-rate scoreboard, wrap-around track and more.
NEWS
By Thomas V. Mike Miller | April 26, 2011
Most of the memories I have of William Donald Schaefer, you can't print. But the things he needs to be remembered for are the Orioles and the Ravens. When he wanted to build Camden Yards and the football stadium, people all over the state said don't build two stadiums. If he hadn't figured out a way to keep it from going to referendum, people all over the state would have voted against two stadiums in Baltimore City. His own advisers said, "Do not put a baseball stadium in downtown Baltimore.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Laura Vozzella, The Baltimore Sun | October 12, 2010
A small city rises up for a day whenever the Baltimore Ravens play at home. Nearly 80,000 fans converge on M&T Bank Stadium, all of them hungry, pretty much all at the same time. Keeping this ravenous crowd well fed is an army of hawkers selling humble hot dogs in the stands. Toqued chefs setting bananas foster aflame in exclusive suites. Wired food-service bigwigs monitoring crowd data on their BlackBerries. Overnight cleanup crews mopping the kitchen floor. Not to mention cooks, who get started days ahead of time in kitchen space that looks like it could serve a good-sized restaurant, not a huge stadium.
NEWS
By Jamie Stiehm and Jamie Stiehm,SUN STAFF | September 5, 2004
As thousands of Naval Academy alumni flocked to Annapolis over Labor Day weekend for the first home football game of the season, Navy-Marine Corps Memorial Stadium was ready to show off its new good looks - and a new community walking trail. Construction workers put final touches on the $40 million, three-year renovation project until the last minute Friday, with ice cream vendors, painters and landscapers putting things in place. Bright coats of blue, gold and gray paint had the refurbished stadium looking like a large, trim ship that had just emerged from the yard.
NEWS
By DAN RODRICKS | July 20, 2003
MAYBE IT'S just me, but news that workers have completed installation of artificial turf in The Stadium That Should Have Been Named For Johnny Unitas feels like the stuff of minor milestone - on a level with McDonald's selling a crab cake. Can you say ersatz? The Ravens give a lot of reasons for putting in synthetic grass - it will last 15 years, it won't need watering or mowing, grounds crews won't have to resod the playing field during the rigorous (10 home games) football season because of wear and tear.
NEWS
By Doug Donovan and Doug Donovan,SUN STAFF | May 22, 2003
The city's Board of Estimates approved yesterday a deal that will help alleviate the financial troubles of a fledgling fleet of shuttles that serve more than 900 downtown workers. The five-member board, which sets the city's fiscal policy, unanimously agreed to practically eliminate the $48,000 fee it charges the Downtown Partnership of Baltimore Inc. for leasing a parking lot near M&T Bank Stadium as the hub of its Downtown Area Shuttle system. The agreement allows the Downtown Partnership to pay $1 to use the city-owned lot on Ostend Street that doubles as overflow parking for Ravens football games.
SPORTS
By Ken Murray and Ken Murray,SUN STAFF | July 9, 1997
Concern registers on the face of hard-hatted Bruce Hoffman as he surveys the seeming rubble in what one day will be the east end zone of the Ravens' gleaming new football stadium at Camden Yards."
NEWS
By Edward Gunts and Edward Gunts,SUN STAFF | August 22, 1996
NOW THAT construction has begun on a $200 million football stadium downtown, Maryland Stadium Authority Chairman John Moag is seeking ideas for improving the entire Camden Yards sports district and the areas around it.Moag is forming a task force to come up with long- and short-term ideas to help the city and the state take advantage of the second downtown stadium, due to open by mid-1998."
FEATURES
By KEVIN COWHERD | May 8, 2003
SO NOW THE football stadium gets a new name, another cold, sterile corporate name that will inspire absolutely no one, delight absolutely no one and be remembered by all for exactly the next three seconds. M&T Bank Stadium. Beautiful. So we go from a failed dot-com to a bank no one has ever heard of, and this is the name with which our football memories will be linked for generations to come. Please. If there's still any debate about why so many people are turned off by big-time sports, by the greed and the indifference shown to the fans, let it end here.
BUSINESS
By Gus G. Sentementes and Gus G. Sentementes,SUN STAFF | March 1, 2002
The Ravens are closer to severing their ties to PSINet Inc. after a federal bankruptcy judge approved a settlement yesterday that returns the naming rights of Baltimore's football stadium to the team in exchange for a cash payment to the bankrupt Internet services company. A Ravens spokesman said the team had expected the settlement's approval, and an attorney for the team said PSINet's name and logo will come down after this month. The team has said that it has heard from companies that have expressed interest in the stadium naming rights, but has not given any details on negotiations.
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