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NEWS
By MICHAEL OLESKER | May 10, 1994
Everybody laughed when Peter Angelos sat down to buy the Baltimore Orioles. Can't be done, everybody with brain cells said. Too late in the game, all the savvy insiders said. So Angelos bought himself his baseball team, and naturally everybody today says they believed in him all along.Now he wants to bring a National Football League team to Baltimore. Can't be done, all the wise guys start to say. Been down this road before, they say. But then they remember Angelos and his snatch of the Orioles, and everybody isn't laughing any more.
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SPORTS
By Jeff Barker, The Baltimore Sun | December 21, 2012
Maryland football coach Randy Edsall wants to make Terrapins spring football more of a fan event - and he hopes to start by bringing it on the road, including perhaps to Baltimore. Edsall said Friday he'd like to hold a spring scrimmage or two away from College Park. He mentioned Baltimore and the Frederick area as possibilities. "Instead of always having people come to us, we go there and make it easier for them," Edsall said. Edsall and other Maryland coaches already travel around the state with athletic department staff, talking to fans during the spring and summer.
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SPORTS
By Andy Friedlander and Andy Friedlander,Contributing Writer | September 14, 1992
SPARTANBURG, S.C. -- Standing onstage before a crowd of cheering people, John Unitas couldn't resist saying his piece.All afternoon, he had resisted a direct answer. He had public relations people tell reporters not to bother asking. But, once onstage, he smiled slyly and finally addressed the question everybody wanted to ask.What was John Unitas, the man most closely identified with football in Baltimore, doing here at a pep rally for the Carolinas, one of Baltimore's rivals in the NFL expansion race?
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach, The Baltimore Sun | October 6, 2012
Steve LaPlanche - "Sports Steve" to his friends - says he hasn't missed a professional football game played in Baltimore since 1956. His streak, he says proudly, is 358 games and counting. "I started going when I was 3, and I haven't missed a Baltimore home game since then," said LaPlanche, 59. "Ever since I was born, sports was like a magnet to me. I've lived and slept sports. " But LaPlanche, whose loyalty has lasted through Baltimore's NFL Colts, USFL Stars and CFL Stallions before settling on the Ravens, isn't simply a dedicated fan. He also makes a proud spectacle of himself at every home game with an intricate homemade getup.
NEWS
January 3, 2001
HE WAS A gentle man and a gentleman. Writer John Steadman entertained sports fans with his upbeat newspaper columns for more than half a century. He covered the Baltimore athletic scene with a tenderness and appreciation of the human spirit that few have rivaled. Mr. Steadman died Monday at 73 after a long struggle with cancer. How ironic that he waited to take his final bow until Baltimore once again had a winning football playoff team to applaud. He wrote about the human side of sports, the unsung heroes and the untold stories, the adversities athletes overcame.
SPORTS
January 3, 1993
Y not U's?As a longtime Baltimore resident, it is with great interest that I have read the many entries in the "Name the New NFL Team" derby. I'd like to take this opportunity to submit my own humble suggestion.I feel the team should be named after someone whose name is synonymous with football in Baltimore -- Johnny Unitas. The Baltimore "U's" is a short name and would simplify the rousing team cheer from the stands: "Gimme a U!Bruce EichelbergerFayetteville, Ark.Soccer town?The quotation from 80-year-old Eugene Ringsdorf in "Baltimore Glimpses" ( The Evening Sun, Dec. 15)
NEWS
By MICHAEL OLESKER | June 3, 1997
The late Jack Kent Cooke had the Rich Guy's Aura. When he turned up at McCafferty's Restaurant in Northwest Baltimore a couple of years ago, there were celebrities all over the place -- old Colts, a bunch of sportscasters, plus a couple of vagrant politicians who had wandered in looking for some second-hand publicity on a live radio broadcast from the restaurant about the future of football in Baltimore.Only Cooke, owner of the Washington Redskins, seemed unapproachable. He and one of his wives had a small table, accompanied by a couple of friends they had rented for the evening, and they seemed utterly isolated inside a protective bubble.
SPORTS
By Jon Morgan and Jon Morgan,Staff Writer | August 29, 1992
The biggest week of football in Baltimore since 1984 appears to have accomplished precisely what its organizers hoped: it climaxed several years of effort just as the NFL prepares to select the sites for two expansion teams."
SPORTS
By JOHN STEADMAN | October 12, 1994
That he became the father of pro football in Baltimore was important to Bob Rodenberg. A monument should be raised in his honor. Historically, he stands alone -- the man who gave the city its first major-league identity. This was the ideal owner, the kind that isn't around much anymore: gregarious, genuine and gracious, a gentleman.Rodenberg died last week and will be remembered at a service tomorrow in Washington. It has always been a contention if Rodenberg could have remained owner of the Colts, the team he started in 1947, the pleasure created for the public would have exceeded anything Baltimore ever experienced.
SPORTS
By VITO STELLINO | September 22, 1991
For the better part of two decades, pro football in Baltimore has been hampered by Murphy's Law -- whatever could go wrong did go wrong.The latest example came when New York businessman Robert Tisch had a chance to buy half of the New York Giants earlier this year and pulled out of the Baltimore expansion picture.What were the odds that one faction of the Mara family suddenly would be willing to sell half the team? The team had been in the family for more than six decades.But it was typical of what has happened to football in Baltimore since Robert Irsay acquired the Colts in 1972.
SPORTS
June 29, 2012
Baltimore Sun reporters Jeff Barker and Don Markus and editor Matt Bracken weigh in on the three biggest topics of the past week in Maryland sports. The Maryland football staff held a “get to know us better” event this week with the media. Does the school and its PR firm want us to see a new Randy Edsall? Jeff Barker: Not new. A little repackaged, maybe. The Maroon firm isn't trying to reinvent the coach. Good public relations firms know you don't try to make clients anything that they are not. You don't want them to appear forced or phony.
NEWS
By FREDERICK N. RASMUSSEN and FREDERICK N. RASMUSSEN,SUN REPORTER | October 6, 2005
Irvin E. Biasi, a retired Patterson High School football and basketball coach who led teams to numerous championships during his 30-year tenure and helped break down racial barriers in Baltimore, died of pneumonia Sunday at a hospital in Hanover, Pa. The former Baltimore resident was 87. Mr. Biasi was born and raised in Luzerne County, in the rugged anthracite coal country of eastern Pennsylvania. He was a 1936 graduate of Hazelton Township High School, where he had been an outstanding athlete, and worked two years before beginning college in 1938.
NEWS
By Lowell E. Sunderland and Lowell E. Sunderland,SUN STAFF | July 13, 2005
IN THIS sports-savvy county, where you can find someone, somewhere, interested in at least 70 variations of sports, the Department of Recreation and Parks has finally encountered one that is an apparent dud. That would be co-rec football - men and women playing flag football. The first advertisement went out during the winter, for a spring season, which the department quickly had to scotch because of staffing problems. But now the brochure is out for fall, with a nice, larger plug for co-rec football, and the result has been: Zip. "We haven't had any interest, yet," said a disappointed Nicola Morgal, the sports supervisor trying to get a league started for a game in which she competes in Baltimore - in a 60-team league, no less.
NEWS
By Gail Gibson and Gail Gibson,SUN STAFF | September 9, 2001
By almost every measure, women's football in Baltimore got off to a dismal start last spring. The Baltimore Burn finished its inaugural season with a 0-8 record. The player roster dwindled, from 46 to 27. Fans were hard to come by, too. The men's pro team in town was basking in Super Bowl glory while the Burn slogged through a rookie season that included one particularly grim 90-22 loss. All of which might suggest that interest in team tryouts for the Baltimore Burn's second season would be limited.
FEATURES
By Rob Hiaasen and Rob Hiaasen,SUN STAFF | January 25, 2001
Never has professional football seemed so distant or foreign as in the grand, marbled lobby of the Maryland Institute, College of Art, where students sit cross-legged or sprawled out on the floor to sketch the larger-than-life Grecian statues in residence. One couldn't feel farther from a sports bar or sports talk radio. Here, students study the shadows and light in such works as "Theseus: From the Parthenon." Their drawings attempt to capture classic human form in these monuments to strength, grace and beauty.
NEWS
January 3, 2001
HE WAS A gentle man and a gentleman. Writer John Steadman entertained sports fans with his upbeat newspaper columns for more than half a century. He covered the Baltimore athletic scene with a tenderness and appreciation of the human spirit that few have rivaled. Mr. Steadman died Monday at 73 after a long struggle with cancer. How ironic that he waited to take his final bow until Baltimore once again had a winning football playoff team to applaud. He wrote about the human side of sports, the unsung heroes and the untold stories, the adversities athletes overcame.
SPORTS
January 8, 1995
Unbeatens should share titleIt's difficult enough having an unbeaten football season if you consider quality of competition, scholastic eligibility, injuries and other off-the-field factors, but to witness two teams with 12-0 and 13-0 records, how can anyone vote one team over another in the mythical race for No. 1?Why is playing in the Orange Bowl the ultimate factor in choosing No. 1? Nebraska and Penn State were each unbeaten; therefore, they should share the No. 1 final ranking.Are the NCAA powers idiots, or don't they truly want to give accolades to the team that finishes first?
SPORTS
By MIKE LITTWIN | February 4, 1991
A guy called on the phone the other day to ask the betting line on the Pro Bowl, which suggests a couple of things: One, he has way too much time and money on his hands; two, life without pro football in your town does something destructive to the brain waves.Yes, another season has officially passed without pro football in Baltimore, leaving us only with the age-old argument of whether or not to support the Redskins (the politically correct position is, of course, to root against). Oh, one other thing we're left with -- hope.
NEWS
By Raymond Daniel Burke | September 17, 2000
THIS WAS THE ONE that got rid of all the frustration." So said then-Baltimore Colt Leonard Lyles to Sports Illustrated following the team's 34-0 annihilation of the Cleveland Browns in the 1968 NFL championship game. His words come to mind in light of the most recent watershed moment in Baltimore football -- the Ravens' stunning 39-36 comeback victory over its former biannual nemesis, the two-time defending division champion Jacksonville Jaguars. But the Ravens' win was not so much about relieving frustration as it was a retrieval of something in our collective past, a part of our community soul.
NEWS
By MICHAEL OLESKER | June 3, 1997
The late Jack Kent Cooke had the Rich Guy's Aura. When he turned up at McCafferty's Restaurant in Northwest Baltimore a couple of years ago, there were celebrities all over the place -- old Colts, a bunch of sportscasters, plus a couple of vagrant politicians who had wandered in looking for some second-hand publicity on a live radio broadcast from the restaurant about the future of football in Baltimore.Only Cooke, owner of the Washington Redskins, seemed unapproachable. He and one of his wives had a small table, accompanied by a couple of friends they had rented for the evening, and they seemed utterly isolated inside a protective bubble.
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