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by Richard Gorelick and The Baltimore Sun | January 20, 2013
The Ravens game on Sunday wasn't expected to hit restaurant businesses as hard as last Saturday's game did. For one thing, Sunday isn't a traditional money-maker for restaurants. But Sotto Sopra, which hosts popular monthly opera nights on Sunday evening, appears to be taking a hit. On Sunday afternoon, the restaurant used its Facebook page to drum up a replacement cast of diners. "Wow we just lost 40 people for opera night thanks to the Ravens game," the post said, quickly adding, "Well we support them all the way and you get a "Ravens" deal.
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NEWS
By Mark Puente, The Baltimore Sun | August 30, 2014
Usually awash with Orioles and Ravens fans, South Paca Street became a sea of scarlet and gray Saturday afternoon. Hundreds of Ohio State University fans filled Pickles Pub, Sliders Bar & Grille and The Bullpen to celebrate after the fifth-ranked Buckeyes beat the Navy Midshipmen at M&T Bank Stadium. Many of the 57,579 fans who left the stadium about 3:30 p.m. headed to bars as others tossed footballs and drank cold drinks in the parking lots. Hundreds of others streamed toward the newly opened Horseshoe Casino Baltimore.
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SPORTS
By Steven Petrella and The Baltimore Sun | July 9, 2012
There's a large contingent of grown men (and women) who pay to use a message board so that they can hang on every word a 17-year-old kid utters. Out of context, this seems very strange. In context, really, it's not much better. What I'm talking about is college football fans and the obsession with recruiting in the modern world, especially with the development of the internet over the past two decades. These fans look at tweets, pictures and stories, trying to gather any inkling of knowledge that will tip a recruit's cap as to where they'll be playing college ball.
NEWS
By Austin Brown | July 17, 2014
Now that it's part of the Big Ten Conference, the University of Maryland will play Pennsylvania State University this upcoming football season on Nov. 1, giving fans their first real shot at a solid football rivalry in years. For 61 years, the Atlantic Coast Conference (ACC) was home to the University of Maryland and its fans, but it never really accepted the university. The All Carolina Conference, as some call it, has always thumbed its nose at Marylanders (designating the University of Pittsburgh as Maryland's "rival" in 2013 - yuck.
NEWS
By Erica L. Green, The Baltimore Sun | November 24, 2011
Kelly Fleming doesn't mind building her family's Thanksgiving schedule around a football game. She's the mother of two Calvert Hall students and knows the annual Turkey Bowl matchup with Loyola gets top billing in her house. With the addition of the Ravens' night game against the San Francisco 49ers to the holiday sports lineup this year, though, even the Flemings had to shift their schedule, canceling plans to travel out of state for a family dinner. "We sacrificed family this year, which is sad, but it will be just as fun," said Fleming, of Ellicott City.
SPORTS
By Childs Walker, The Baltimore Sun | December 27, 2013
After three years of pain, Maryland football fans just wanted a chance to party in the waning days of a season. So smiles abounded in Annapolis on Friday as Terps supporters gathered to celebrate the program's first bowl appearance since 2010. The Military Bowl might be far from the pinnacle of college football. And plenty of Maryland fans might retain misgivings about third-year coach Randy Edsall. But given the negativity that surrounded the program just a few months ago, as injuries threatened to derail another season, the late-December game against Marshall struck many as a perfectly fine holiday gift.
SPORTS
By Dan Shaughnessy and Dan Shaughnessy,Boston Globe | December 19, 1994
ORCHARD PARK, N.Y. -- This is the way it felt when Larry Bird came to town and turned around the Celtics in 1979. This is the way it felt in 1970 when Bobby Orr and the Big Bad Bruins inspired us to build skating rinks in every New England town. This is the way it felt when the Fenway's Cardiac Kids forged the Impossible Dream in 1967.Exaggerations don't do the job anymore. Mere hyperbole won't suffice. With only six shopping days left until Christmas, the New England Patriots are the rising stars of the National Football League.
NEWS
December 21, 1999
RAVENS players invented a new routine Sunday to celebrate big plays. Several times, they formed a circle, tossed the pigskin in the air and fell down backward. Picture "Ring Around the Rosy" with 300-pound men. But the more notable choreography was happening off the field: A 39-year-old Anne Arundel County businessman who made a fortune in the temporary employment industry agreed to buy 49 percent of the team from Art Modell for $275 million.The arrangement appears promising for all stakeholders: Stephen J. Bisciotti may live out the dream of every "rotisserie league" fan by gaining ownership of the team for an additional $325 million between 2004 and 2006.
FEATURES
By Maria Blackburn and Maria Blackburn,CONTRIBUTING WRITER | October 11, 1999
A lone warrior, Ben Clark plows his way through the pack of towering behemoths. His arms pump like pistons. His legs are a blur. Rumbling, bumbling, stumbling, recovering, he blasts forward. Finally, triumph is his.The television cameras catch it all -- the beads of sweat, the tortured brow, the glory. Clark's image is beamed to living rooms across the country, to devoted fans cheering from couches.The sandy-haired dynamo from Richmond, Ind., is, after all, U.S. Grand Master National Champion.
SPORTS
By MIKE PRESTON | September 23, 2006
Steve McNair had already experienced the ups and downs of being an NFL quarterback, but being the starter in Baltimore might be like no other. Until last weekend, McNair was the savior of the franchise, but after a poor showing against Oakland, some fans wondered if he had traded jerseys with Kyle Boller. Ravens fans are no different than other football fans, but they have been rooting for a team that has been offensively challenged and quarterback deprived for seven years. The frustration level with quarterbacks is high and can overflow quickly.
NEWS
Susan Reimer | January 13, 2014
Can you believe it? Just when we need it most, there may be a shortage of Velveeta. The marigold-colored cheese product that melts so smoothly may be missing from your grocer's shelves - it doesn't require refrigeration - just as the NFL playoffs and Super Bowl loom. Football fans are facing a dip crisis. An enterprising reporter for Advertising Age magazine discovered the possibility of a Velveeta shortage when customers noticed there wasn't any to be had in a couple of East Coast grocery stores.
SPORTS
By Childs Walker, The Baltimore Sun | December 27, 2013
After three years of pain, Maryland football fans just wanted a chance to party in the waning days of a season. So smiles abounded in Annapolis on Friday as Terps supporters gathered to celebrate the program's first bowl appearance since 2010. The Military Bowl might be far from the pinnacle of college football. And plenty of Maryland fans might retain misgivings about third-year coach Randy Edsall. But given the negativity that surrounded the program just a few months ago, as injuries threatened to derail another season, the late-December game against Marshall struck many as a perfectly fine holiday gift.
NEWS
Susan Reimer | October 6, 2013
The Baltimore Sun Malcolm Gladwell, the engaging writer who finds connections in the happenstance that help explain our world, started this discussion with an article he wrote for New Yorker magazine way back in October of 2009, titled "Offensive Play. " Is it morally acceptable to watch football when it is clear that the game is irretrievably harmful to those who play it? Is it ethical to watch injuries being inflicted for entertainment's sake? "Watching a violent sport is not a morally neutral act," he said in the weeks after his article stirred the hornet's nest.
NEWS
By Leonard Pitts Jr | June 16, 2013
See if this makes sense to you: For years, I've argued with certain African-American people about their insistence upon using the so-called N-word which, to my ears, is, inalterably, a statement of self-loathing. They say I don't understand. They say the word no longer means what it has always meant. They say it's just a friendly fraternal greeting. I say one cannot arbitrarily decide that a word -- especially an old and bloodstained word -- suddenly means something other than what it always has. I say that while language does change over time, it doesn't do so because a few of us want it to or tell it to. And I say that if I call you an "idiot," but say that "idiot" now means "genius," you will be no less insulted.
EXPLORE
EDITORIAL FROM THE AEGIS | February 5, 2013
It's been a heck of a year for football fans in Harford County. Fans were treated the excitement of what has become one of the great rivalries in professional sports as the Ravens and Steelers split the pair of games they played in the regular season. The home team then went on to redeem itself in the post season following a heartbreaking final playoff game in 2011. And, oh yeah, there was the Super Bowl. For those keeping track, it's the second big game victory for the Ravens and the third for a Baltimore team.
ENTERTAINMENT
by Richard Gorelick and The Baltimore Sun | January 20, 2013
The Ravens game on Sunday wasn't expected to hit restaurant businesses as hard as last Saturday's game did. For one thing, Sunday isn't a traditional money-maker for restaurants. But Sotto Sopra, which hosts popular monthly opera nights on Sunday evening, appears to be taking a hit. On Sunday afternoon, the restaurant used its Facebook page to drum up a replacement cast of diners. "Wow we just lost 40 people for opera night thanks to the Ravens game," the post said, quickly adding, "Well we support them all the way and you get a "Ravens" deal.
SPORTS
By RICK MAESE | November 22, 2006
For the first time in a two-week period, the band is silent. We're standing inside the tunnel, and even though thousands of football fans are in their seats outside, all I can hear are those fears and worries that have bothered me since I joined the Marching Ravens. Only on this day, the doubts aren't whispering in the back of my head. They're screaming, fighting to be heard over the crowd noise. We're about to leave the tunnel, and I know exactly how this is supposed to look. I'd seen the marching band's pre-game routine many times.
FEATURES
By Rob Hiaasen and Rob Hiaasen,SUN STAFF | September 28, 1996
Bye weeks are beautiful. Football fans can honestly say the Ravens haven't lost since the summer.Way back then, the Houston Oilers drilled the Ravens. We forget the score, it was so long ago. The point is Baltimore football fans don't need to be reminded it's a long season, etc. We have patience. We are loyal -- up to a point.If the Ravens do beat the New Orleans Saints, the Ravens run ZTC their fall record to 1-0. If they lose tomorrow to the 0-4 Saints, be prepared for the Agony of Quotes.
NEWS
December 20, 2012
With the possible exception of Mayan calendar followers and all others who expect the world to end in a matter of hours, is there a gloomier bunch around metropolitan Baltimore than Ravens fans? Rarely in the history of professional sports have people with so little to grouse about made themselves so miserable. It can't be a Baltimore thing. Just three months ago, this city was thrilled over the unexpected good fortune of a hometown team that hoped to - in the final days of its season - capture a playoff spot.
SPORTS
December 13, 2012
Everyone can relax now that NASA has put out a video - 10 days ahead of time - explaining why the world didn't end on Dec. 21, which is the final day of the Mayan Calendar and has long been a popular focus of goofball doomsday theorists. The nation's highly respected space agency filmed the YouTube video with the original intention of releasing it on Dec. 22, since it's entitled “Why the World Didn't End Yesterday.” I'm guessing they released it early to avert a Stub Hub meltdown caused by fatalistic football fans trying to dump their tickets for Week 16. Whatever the reason, Ravens fans can rest easy that the only doomsday scenario that might play out over the next nine days is the possibility of M&T Bank Stadium being torched by both Peyton and Eli Manning.
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