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By Bill Glauber and Bill Glauber,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | February 24, 2001
LONDON -- Foot-and-mouth disease has hit the British right where it hurts -- in the countryside. From yesterday's announcement of a weeklong ban on transporting livestock to the cancellation of such favored country activities as fox hunts, organized hikes and a horse racing meeting, the British continued to try to contain and eliminate the fast-moving virus. Officials sought to move quickly to pinpoint the source of the outbreak that was first identified Monday and which has hit six locations -- three farms and a slaughter house in Essex, a partially rural county outside London, and two farms in Northumberland, in northern England.
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NEWS
By Andrea K. Walker, The Baltimore Sun | December 12, 2012
Hand, foot and mouth disease is a common ailment often picked up by children in day care. While it may make for a cranky child, Dr. Benjamin N. Lockshin, a Silver Spring dermatologist who also teaches at Georgetown University and the Johns Hopkins University, said the disease is easily treated. What is hand, foot and mouth disease? Hand, foot and mouth disease is a common, self-limited viral infection typically affecting children ages 2 to 10 years old. What are the symptoms?
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NEWS
April 6, 2001
AS THE NUMBER of sites infected with foot-and-mouth disease passed 1,000 in the United Kingdom, despite the momentous slaughter of livestock, it took a political toll. Prime Minister Tony Blair felt compelled by the demands of farmers, clergy and opposition Conservatives to postpone the May 3 local elections to June 7. The likelihood is that he'll call a national election for that same date. This concession stopped short of what many demanded -- an indefinite postponement. Their idea is that a campaign would distract from the national priority of ending the virus epidemic that is destroying farm value.
HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn | August 24, 2012
A new strain of hand-foot-and-mouth disease has been sickening local children and sending many scared parents to the pediatrician and emergency room, according to Johns Hopkins pediatric dermatologists . But the doctors say most cases are benign and clear up in a little over a week without treatment. Hopkins doctors have seen almost 50 cases in recent months and fielded many more phone calls from parents and doctors, according to Dr. Bernard Cohen, director of pediatric dermatology at Hopkins Children's Center . And he said most cases are probably seen in primary care pediatricians' offices.
NEWS
March 28, 2001
BEAGLES sniffing out a pack of beef jerky on an airliner arriving from London. Airport inspectors seizing ham sandwiches made in Germany. Travelers treating their shoes with disinfectant. These are signs of the times in the deadly serious battle to prevent the spread of virulent foot-and-mouth disease from Europe to the United States. The highly contagious virus is wiping out European livestock, causing the United States and Canada to ban imports of raw meat and dairy products from those countries.
NEWS
By Maria Blackburn and Maria Blackburn,SUN STAFF | March 29, 2001
In January 1929, a California farmer named Frank B. Haas noticed that some of his hogs were lame. He saw little reason to worry. The animals ate garbage that sometimes contained bone, tacks or pieces of glass that pierced the animals' hoofs. But the number of sick hogs rose. After Haas called a county livestock inspection agent, officials found foot-and-mouth disease on his ranch. The source? Some of the garbage fed to the hogs had come from a steamship that carried meat scraps from South America contaminated with the foot-and-mouth virus.
NEWS
By Bill Glauber and Bill Glauber,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | April 16, 2001
LONDON - It's the first day of their spring vacation trip to Britain, and Betsy and Keith Walker want their friends back in the United States to know that they haven't come across burning pyres of pigs, cattle or sheep. The couple from Tappan, N.Y., can breathe the air, drink the water and even eat the food in a country where foot-and-mouth disease has ravaged not just farming, but tourism. "Our friends were saying, `Oh my God, why are you going to Britain?'" Betsy Walker says as she and her husband - who was born in Birmingham, England, but who considers himself a New Yorker, right down to the Yankees cap he is wearing - stride on the south bank of the Thames River.
NEWS
By Bill Glauber and Bill Glauber,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | February 27, 2001
KINGSWEAR, England - Richard Haddock never imagined that this could be another winter of discontent for British farming. The brawny cattleman thought he and other farmers had turned the corner from the Mad Cow disease disaster that struck Britain nearly five years ago, costing billions of dollars, leading to the slaughter of millions of animals and killing more than 80 people. But Haddock and other British farmers now are checking their livestock daily for telltale signs of foot-and-mouth disease.
NEWS
By Laura Cadiz and Laura Cadiz,SUN STAFF | March 16, 2001
As a seasoned traveler, Ramoni Akorede knows not to bring fresh meat with him while flying back to Baltimore after an international trip -- especially because of the foot-and-mouth disease outbreak in Great Britain. "No way, you can't bring that in," the Baltimore resident said. "They'll take that from you." Baltimore-Washington International Airport, like airports nationally, has stepped up security measures to prevent foot-and-mouth disease from spreading to the United States. BWI requires travelers from infected countries to surrender fresh beef and swine, and may disinfect their shoes with bleach if they've visited a farm overseas.
NEWS
By Laura Cadiz and Laura Cadiz,SUN STAFF | March 16, 2001
As a seasoned traveler, Ramoni Akorede knows not to bring fresh meat with him while flying back to Baltimore after an international trip - especially because of the foot-and-mouth disease outbreak in Great Britain. "No way, you can't bring that in," the Baltimore resident said. "They'll take that from you." He's right. Baltimore-Washington International Airport, as with airports nationally, has stepped up security measures to prevent foot-and-mouth disease from spreading to the United States.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,SUN STAFF | January 25, 2002
At 7 a.m., a veterinarian in Frederick County takes a telephone call from a worried dairyman. Several of the farmer's cattle are slobbering and feverish. They appear lame, with sores on their feet and in their mouths. The vet drives out to the farm and soon is on the telephone, describing the scene in the dairy barn to the state agricultural veterinarian. By 11:15 a.m., a state foreign animal disease diagnostician has reached the dairy. He reports back that he is "highly suspicious" that the Frederick cows are infected with foot-and-mouth disease, perhaps the most contagious and dreaded livestock disease known to modern agriculture.
NEWS
By Ridgely Ochs and Ridgely Ochs,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | September 9, 2001
NEW YORK - Accessible only by government-owned ferries either from Long Island, N.Y., or from Old Saybrook, Conn., and covered in beach plum and low scrubby pine, sandy Plum Island looks more like a blissful haven for birds than the site of high-level research. But, housed in a large brick-and-concrete building that looks like a middle school with large loading docks and myriad stacks jutting up from the roof, the Plum Island Animal Disease Center is ground zero in the United States for the study of foot-and-mouth disease, the animal equivalent of the plague.
BUSINESS
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | May 20, 2001
The price of U.S. cowhide is soaring and the cost of finished leather will soon follow, the first major repercussions in America from Europe's twin plagues of foot-and-mouth and "mad cow" disease. American shoppers could end up paying as much as $1.5 billion more for leather goods over the next year, a Commerce Department economist said. The increases should be small on items such as purses and wallets, but products requiring more material, such as leather furniture and car seats, could rise in price by hundreds of dollars.
NEWS
By Bill Glauber and Bill Glauber,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | April 16, 2001
LONDON - It's the first day of their spring vacation trip to Britain, and Betsy and Keith Walker want their friends back in the United States to know that they haven't come across burning pyres of pigs, cattle or sheep. The couple from Tappan, N.Y., can breathe the air, drink the water and even eat the food in a country where foot-and-mouth disease has ravaged not just farming, but tourism. "Our friends were saying, `Oh my God, why are you going to Britain?'" Betsy Walker says as she and her husband - who was born in Birmingham, England, but who considers himself a New Yorker, right down to the Yankees cap he is wearing - stride on the south bank of the Thames River.
NEWS
April 6, 2001
AS THE NUMBER of sites infected with foot-and-mouth disease passed 1,000 in the United Kingdom, despite the momentous slaughter of livestock, it took a political toll. Prime Minister Tony Blair felt compelled by the demands of farmers, clergy and opposition Conservatives to postpone the May 3 local elections to June 7. The likelihood is that he'll call a national election for that same date. This concession stopped short of what many demanded -- an indefinite postponement. Their idea is that a campaign would distract from the national priority of ending the virus epidemic that is destroying farm value.
NEWS
By Maria Blackburn and Maria Blackburn,SUN STAFF | March 29, 2001
In January 1929, a California farmer named Frank B. Haas noticed that some of his hogs were lame. He saw little reason to worry. The animals ate garbage that sometimes contained bone, tacks or pieces of glass that pierced the animals' hoofs. But the number of sick hogs rose. After Haas called a county livestock inspection agent, officials found foot-and-mouth disease on his ranch. The source? Some of the garbage fed to the hogs had come from a steamship that carried meat scraps from South America contaminated with the foot-and-mouth virus.
NEWS
By Laura Cadiz and Laura Cadiz,SUN STAFF | March 16, 2001
As a seasoned traveler, Ramoni Akorede knows not to bring fresh meat with him while flying back to Baltimore after an international trip - especially because of the foot-and-mouth disease outbreak in Great Britain. "No way, you can't bring that in," the Baltimore resident said. "They'll take that from you." He's right. Baltimore-Washington International Airport, as with airports nationally, has stepped up security measures to prevent foot-and-mouth disease from spreading to the United States.
NEWS
By Ridgely Ochs and Ridgely Ochs,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | September 9, 2001
NEW YORK - Accessible only by government-owned ferries either from Long Island, N.Y., or from Old Saybrook, Conn., and covered in beach plum and low scrubby pine, sandy Plum Island looks more like a blissful haven for birds than the site of high-level research. But, housed in a large brick-and-concrete building that looks like a middle school with large loading docks and myriad stacks jutting up from the roof, the Plum Island Animal Disease Center is ground zero in the United States for the study of foot-and-mouth disease, the animal equivalent of the plague.
NEWS
By Bill Glauber and Bill Glauber,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | March 28, 2001
TIRRIL, England - A cold wind beats down on David Altham as he stands on a straw carpet drenched in disinfectant at his quarantined farm, watching the collapse of his family's way of life. Clouds of white smoke waft over the pyre that incinerates the last of his herd, 308 dairy cattle, a farm family's bounty amassed through nearly 60 years and three generations. "To have it all disappear in smoke is not pleasant," Altham understates in a soft, steady voice. This is Britain's silent spring, a season of death and despair as foot-and-mouth disease runs wild in a treasured corner of Cumbria.
NEWS
March 28, 2001
BEAGLES sniffing out a pack of beef jerky on an airliner arriving from London. Airport inspectors seizing ham sandwiches made in Germany. Travelers treating their shoes with disinfectant. These are signs of the times in the deadly serious battle to prevent the spread of virulent foot-and-mouth disease from Europe to the United States. The highly contagious virus is wiping out European livestock, causing the United States and Canada to ban imports of raw meat and dairy products from those countries.
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