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TRAVEL
By Nancy Jones-Bonbrest, Special to The Baltimore Sun | May 12, 2011
What better place for a foodie than in a resort town with as many as 200 restaurants ranging from local seafood to Japanese food to smoked BBQ. Here are a few things to check out that are sure to bring out the foodie in all. Get a room with a menu. Stay at the Hilton Suites Ocean City Oceanfront, if not for the rooms — which offer fabulous ocean front views — then for the fact that you'll also have access to 32 Palm Restaurant. The much talked about restaurant offers a unique blend of Western Caribbean with Eastern Shore favorites.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Richard Gorelick, The Baltimore Sun | December 27, 2013
The year 2013 was, for the most part, a positive one on the Baltimore dining scene, except perhaps for trend-spotters. For every sign, there was a counter-sign. The sudden closing of a restaurant was followed by an unexpected, or at least not highly publicized, appearance of a new place. One restaurant would make itself over into an informal version of its formal self, and across town, a fine-dining establishment would open. Small plates continued to spin. Farm-to-table concepts continued to matter, but restaurants started to present them differently.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Kit Waskom Pollard,
For The Baltimore Sun
| August 21, 2013
In these food-happy times, even the pizza joint has evolved beyond the slice-and-soda model into something the most diehard foodie could love. HomeSlyce is proof. The bar/restaurant, which has Federal Hill and Mount Vernon locations, joins a handful of new Baltimore spots that elevate pizza beyond the ordinary, focusing on great ingredients and experimental toppings. At the Mount Vernon location, service is sometimes scattered, but the food is top-notch. Scene & Decor When we arrived at the Mount Vernon HomeSlyce, around 6:30 p.m. on a midsummer Thursday, we had no trouble finding a table.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Kit Waskom Pollard,
For The Baltimore Sun
| August 21, 2013
In these food-happy times, even the pizza joint has evolved beyond the slice-and-soda model into something the most diehard foodie could love. HomeSlyce is proof. The bar/restaurant, which has Federal Hill and Mount Vernon locations, joins a handful of new Baltimore spots that elevate pizza beyond the ordinary, focusing on great ingredients and experimental toppings. At the Mount Vernon location, service is sometimes scattered, but the food is top-notch. Scene & Decor When we arrived at the Mount Vernon HomeSlyce, around 6:30 p.m. on a midsummer Thursday, we had no trouble finding a table.
NEWS
By Janet Gilbert | February 17, 2008
Watching the Food Network can make your mouth water for exotic dishes that you can't possibly assemble after work. This is not a problem as an adult, because you would never think of preparing the featured dish immediately. Instead, you might make some mental notes for a future shopping list and tell yourself you'll print out the recipe from the Web site and prepare that extraordinary dish later, over the weekend. Then, when the weekend rolls around, you'll open up a bag of salad, throw some chicken on the grill and call it dinner.
NEWS
By ELIZABETH LARGE | October 14, 2009
I was on vacation last week, so I was delighted when John Lindner, a frequent contributor to Dining@Large (baltimoresun.com/diningatlarge), volunteered his list of Top 10 Signs You're a Foodie. Needless to say, it sparked some outraged comments: 1 You remember where you were and what you were doing when you heard that Martick's closed. 2 You know that basmati is not the capital of India. 3 Your meal is ruined when you're served from your left (or right -- the point is, darn it, it matters)
NEWS
By William Rice and William Rice,Special to the Sun | June 22, 2003
A foodie "starts talking about dinner while eating breakfast," said Hans Willimann, general manager of Chicago's Four Seasons hotel. "Am I a foodie? Well, I never tire of talking about food." He is not the only one. The foodie's time has come. "I cannot pick out a foodie merely by sight, though a lot of them seem to dress in black," said Adam Drewnowski, director of the Nutritional Science Program at the University of Washington, a specialist in taste preferences and food cravings and a foodie himself.
TRAVEL
By Melissa Harris and Melissa Harris,Sun Reporter | July 22, 2007
EMBARRASSING CONFESSION from a wannabe "foodie": Until a recent trip to San Francisco, I thought Michelin only made tires. "All of the places we're going to in Napa have Michelin stars," my sister, Andrea, boasted minutes after my boyfriend and I arrived at her North Beach apartment for a week-long family vacation. "Not the same company that makes the tires?" I asked. My continent-hopping sister looked at me -- the sibling who actually uses her stove and who subscribes to zagat.com and Food and Wine magazine -- as if I had spent my post-college years in a black hole.
NEWS
By Kate Shatzkin | May 28, 2008
kosherblog.net This blog from a foodie who keeps kosher reviews kosher cookbooks and restaurants. It has a discussion forum and links to lots of other kosher sites.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Karen Nitkin and Karen Nitkin,special to the sun | November 16, 2006
All discussion of Koco's Pub and Grill, a friendly little eatery in Baltimore's Lauraville neighborhood, must begin with the crab cake ($23.95). This enormous mound of pure, snowy lumps has been compared to a softball on foodie Web sites. But I think they're even bigger than that. Maybe a grapefruit. Or a small cantaloupe. Poor:]
EXPLORE
By Laura Barnhardt Cech | April 2, 2013
The Pissaladiere Nicoise, an onion tart studded with black olives and anchovies, is being passed around to the dinner guests while the Navets a la Champenoise, a turnip casserole, and braised stuffed breast of veal finish in the oven. A French Frisee salad with lardons (bacon) and quail eggs will be served, followed by a dessert course of Tarte aux Pommes (apple tart) and Reine de Saba Cake, a chocolatey confection also known as Queen of Sheba Cake. In other words, it's fancy-schmancy.
NEWS
By Richard Gorelick, The Baltimore Sun | February 5, 2013
Founded just last year, Union Craft Brewing has established itself as a major player in Baltimore's craft-beer movement. Tours and tastings are given every Saturday from 1 p.m. to 4 p.m. at the brewery's headquarters in Woodberry, in the shadow of the Pepsi sign, The brewery is also developing into a popular venue for medium-sized events, indoor and out. Parking is easy, and the brewery is steps away from a light rail stop. On Friday, the brewery is hosting an event called the Truck Party Food Rally, from 5 p.m. to 9 p.m., featuring a group of popular food trucks, including Gypsy Queen , Kommie Pig , Kooper's Chowhound and Sultan . Guests at the event can buy $4 pints of Union Craft beers.
EXPLORE
October 7, 2012
A Taste of Hampden, the popular annual benefit for the Hampden Family Center, is Thursday, Oct. 25, from 6-9 p.m. Tickets are $30 each, with all proceeds earmarked for the center. As the number of great restaurants in Hampden increases, this event becomes more than a good charity event, but a bargain for foodies. You get to sample the offerings from a number of Hampden's award-winning restaurants, you get to enjoy tasty beverages, and you get to hang out with some awesome folks.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Mary Alice Fallon Yeskey | September 13, 2012
Kerry, Chris, Lorena and Patricia remain. The Quickfire takes advantage of our even number of chefs left -- the kitchen is divided in half by a long line of red gaffer tape. The chefs are paired off and tasked with creating a dish each, but one must remain on the pantry side, one must stay on the hot line. The guest judge is Johnny Avello, who runs the only sports book in Vegas that holds odds on entertainment -- he's previously held odds on "Top Chef. " He wins as the least interesting and most forgettable guest judge of the season.
NEWS
Jacques Kelly | July 13, 2012
Catonsville's business district does not seem to change much. Large-scale development has skipped over Frederick Road and left the core of the 19th- and 20th-century shop fronts facing the old turnpike and streetcar route alone. It's clean and orderly, but not gentrified or given to a faux-Nantucket boutique treatment. The street has never surrendered its small-town feel, and the residents like it that way. I spoke with Lynn Tawney Street, who is a big believer in the small-town charms of the neighborhood where she has lived her entire life.
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik, The Baltimore Sun | June 24, 2012
From Baron Ambrosia dueling with John Waters on the Cooking Channel on Friday, to Adam Richman featuring Faidley's crab cake sandwich this week on the Travel Channel, Baltimore has been getting its share of foodie TV lately. But it looks to be mere prelude to what Baltimore's most irrepressible TV chef, Duff Goldman, is planning for Hungry, an entire YouTube channel devoted to food, which he is helping create, produce and will appear on starting July 2. Described as a cutting-edge example of cable TV for the Internet, Hungry will have a definite Baltimore flavor, the former "Ace of Cakes" star vows.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Richard Gorelick and The Baltimore Sun | May 1, 2012
The third annual Foodie Experience is just around the corner, and the Hippodrome has released the lineup of participating restaurants, caterers and other vendors. Among them are a few restaurants that will be making their Foodie Experience debuts, including Bond Street Social , Rye , Shapiro's Cafe , Stuggy's and Waterfront Kitchen . Instead of a post-show reception, the grazing and tasting portion of the May 12 event will take place before headliner Andrew Zimmern, host of the Travel Channel's popular program "Bizarre Foods," takes the stage at 6 p.m. Beginning at 3 p.m., restaurants and caterers will serve samples inside the theater.
ENTERTAINMENT
By John Houser III, Special to The Baltimore Sun | April 14, 2012
After years of being relegated through the purgatory of forgotten foods, kale has found itself in the spotlight for the first time in decades and is ready to prove it belongs there permanently. A crop of the ancients, kale has been cultivated for over 2,000 years and was the precursor to modern-day cabbage, brussel sprouts, cauliflower and broccoli. Easy to plant, harvest and propagate, kale was a favorite of both the Romans and the Greeks. The leafy green fell out of favor in many cultures in the last century, as more exotic cruciferous vegetables became popular.
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