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By ALETA WATSON and ALETA WATSON,SAN JOSE MERCURY NEWS | June 28, 2006
Julia Child, James Beard and New York Times critic Craig Claiborne may have introduced America to the wonders of great food in the 1960s, but Gael Greene was the hip young writer who chronicled Manhattan's culinary coming of age. Her breezy, irreverent restaurant reviews in the glossy pages of upstart New York Magazine were a must-read for would-be gourmands who yearned to sup among the rich and powerful. For nearly four decades, Greene has covered the food revolution from the front lines.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Mary Carole McCauley, The Baltimore Sun | June 3, 2014
The 2014 Baltimore Book Festival will feature a lineup that includes a National Book Award-winning author, a novelist whose previous work was made into an Academy Award-nominated film, a popular sports broadcaster and a food writer who has penned a memoir with recipes. Highlights of the 19 t h festival, which will be held from Sept. 26-28, were announced Tuesday in a news release by the Baltimore Office of Promotion and the Arts. Featured authors and books will include: former National Book Award winner Alice McDermott reading from her most recent novel, "Someone," an elegant tone poem that traces the life of an ordinary woman; Andre Dubus III's highly praised collection of four novellas, "Dirty Love"; the father-son memoir "Forgotten Sundays" penned by WBAL-TV sports director Gerry Sandusky; and "Slices of Life," by food writer Leah Eskin, whose column runs in The Baltimore Sun's Wednesday Taste section.
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NEWS
By Jennifer Day and Jennifer Day,Chicago Tribune | July 23, 2008
M.F.K. Fisher, who would have turned 100 earlier this month, was one of the first food writers to untangle all that's bound up in eating: the pleasure, the sentiment, the anxiety. Her best-remembered stories describe the magic of tangerines drying on radiators or the fuzz skimmed from her grandmother's strawberry jam. But those are stories for better times. In How to Cook a Wolf - the book she wrote just after the bombing of Pearl Harbor in 1941 - the focus was on surviving with "grace and gusto."
ENTERTAINMENT
By Mary Carole McCauley, The Baltimore Sun | September 22, 2010
Richard Gorelick, a freelance writer known for his witty and insightful prose style, has been named The Baltimore Sun's new restaurant critic. When Gorelick joins the paper Monday, his duties will include reviewing the area's impressive array of restaurants and operating the Sun's successful food blog. Dining at Large was started by former restaurant critic Elizabeth Large, who retired in February after 37 years on the beat. "Richard will do a great job," Large said. "His reviews are very knowledgeable and fun to read.
FEATURES
By Waltrina Stovall and Waltrina Stovall,Dallas Morning News Universal Press Syndicate | June 17, 1992
Alot of people think the life of a food writer and restaurant critic is a bowl of beluga caviar.The truth is that occasionally it's having to summon the nerve to taste something you can't identify by sight -- or discovering that the whole broiled fish you're eating "isn't hollow," to put it nicely. And sometimes the dinner plate holds vegetables that may have been on the steam table long before you called for a reservation.My ability to stomach this job must be credited to my mother.She is a good cook -- mostly simple foods, she'd say, but my siblings and I learned to like liver and to try brains with scrambled eggs.
FEATURES
By Karol V. Menzie and Karol V. Menzie,Sun Staff Writer | December 21, 1994
Food journalists see an amazing number of cookbooks over the course of the year, and while some are not memorable, a surprising number of them do stand out. So it's hard to pick just two or three favorites, but here are a food writer's choices for three must-haves from the 1994 crop:* "Spur of the Moment Cook," by Perla Meyers (William A. Morrow, $25). I've loved Perla Meyers' practical, humorous approach ever since I discovered her "Art of Seasonal Cooking" back in the '70s.Her new book is exactly the way I cook in the '90s: Keeping a good pantry, buying what's fresh or seasonal, improvising with what's on hand.
NEWS
By Charles Perry and Charles Perry,LOS ANGELES TIMES | December 4, 2003
Alan Davidson, a food writer and the center of a worldwide network of culinary scholars, died Tuesday at London's Chelsea and Westminster Hospital after losing consciousness at his home a few hours earlier. He was 79. In recent years, he had suffered from various health problems, but on Nov. 5 he was able to accept the Dutch government's prestigious Erasmus Prize in Amsterdam. In the United States, Mr. Davidson was best-known for The Oxford Companion to Food. The 900-page book, reprinted as The Penguin Companion to Food, took 18 years to write and presented an immense amount of information about ingredients, food preparation and the world's cuisines in a disarmingly light, whimsical tone.
NEWS
April 5, 2006
EVENTS chocolate andzucchini.com Click on the "edible guide to NYC" on this site, run by a food writer in Paris, for a romp among the bars, cafes, bakeries, delis, pizza joints, Asian, Indian, vegetarian, burger and soul-food establishments of New York City. The descriptions were written by contributors. Knight Ridder/Tribune
ENTERTAINMENT
By Mary Carole McCauley, The Baltimore Sun | June 3, 2014
The 2014 Baltimore Book Festival will feature a lineup that includes a National Book Award-winning author, a novelist whose previous work was made into an Academy Award-nominated film, a popular sports broadcaster and a food writer who has penned a memoir with recipes. Highlights of the 19 t h festival, which will be held from Sept. 26-28, were announced Tuesday in a news release by the Baltimore Office of Promotion and the Arts. Featured authors and books will include: former National Book Award winner Alice McDermott reading from her most recent novel, "Someone," an elegant tone poem that traces the life of an ordinary woman; Andre Dubus III's highly praised collection of four novellas, "Dirty Love"; the father-son memoir "Forgotten Sundays" penned by WBAL-TV sports director Gerry Sandusky; and "Slices of Life," by food writer Leah Eskin, whose column runs in The Baltimore Sun's Wednesday Taste section.
FEATURES
By Irene Sax and Irene Sax,Newsday Los Angeles Times Syndicate | April 25, 1993
NEW YORK -- Claudia Roden was calling.The English food writer had heard about Dalia Carmel's cookbooks in Israel and had gotten her phone number at a food conference in Boston. Now she was in New York and wanted to come over and look through the books."You see?" said Ms. Carmel, smiling. "This happens all the time."Tall, handsome, with short gray hair and a soft Israeli accent, Ms. Carmel is living out every collector's dream. The passion for buying cookbooks that was for many years "my private disease, my mishegoss [craziness]"
NEWS
By Jennifer Day and Jennifer Day,Chicago Tribune | July 23, 2008
M.F.K. Fisher, who would have turned 100 earlier this month, was one of the first food writers to untangle all that's bound up in eating: the pleasure, the sentiment, the anxiety. Her best-remembered stories describe the magic of tangerines drying on radiators or the fuzz skimmed from her grandmother's strawberry jam. But those are stories for better times. In How to Cook a Wolf - the book she wrote just after the bombing of Pearl Harbor in 1941 - the focus was on surviving with "grace and gusto."
NEWS
By ALETA WATSON and ALETA WATSON,SAN JOSE MERCURY NEWS | June 28, 2006
Julia Child, James Beard and New York Times critic Craig Claiborne may have introduced America to the wonders of great food in the 1960s, but Gael Greene was the hip young writer who chronicled Manhattan's culinary coming of age. Her breezy, irreverent restaurant reviews in the glossy pages of upstart New York Magazine were a must-read for would-be gourmands who yearned to sup among the rich and powerful. For nearly four decades, Greene has covered the food revolution from the front lines.
NEWS
April 5, 2006
EVENTS chocolate andzucchini.com Click on the "edible guide to NYC" on this site, run by a food writer in Paris, for a romp among the bars, cafes, bakeries, delis, pizza joints, Asian, Indian, vegetarian, burger and soul-food establishments of New York City. The descriptions were written by contributors. Knight Ridder/Tribune
NEWS
By Charles Perry and Charles Perry,LOS ANGELES TIMES | December 4, 2003
Alan Davidson, a food writer and the center of a worldwide network of culinary scholars, died Tuesday at London's Chelsea and Westminster Hospital after losing consciousness at his home a few hours earlier. He was 79. In recent years, he had suffered from various health problems, but on Nov. 5 he was able to accept the Dutch government's prestigious Erasmus Prize in Amsterdam. In the United States, Mr. Davidson was best-known for The Oxford Companion to Food. The 900-page book, reprinted as The Penguin Companion to Food, took 18 years to write and presented an immense amount of information about ingredients, food preparation and the world's cuisines in a disarmingly light, whimsical tone.
FEATURES
October 1, 2002
Sun staff writer Peter Jensen won first place in a national writing competition sponsored by the Association of Food Journalists, an organization representing food editors, columnists and reporters in the United States and Canada. Jensen's five-part series "The Global Grill" was deemed best series, special section or special project for newspapers with circulations between 200,000 and 400,000. The award was announced Saturday at the organization's annual conference in Vancouver, British Columbia.
FEATURES
By Sara Engram and Sara Engram,SUN STAFF | March 20, 2002
Attention, all baristas! There's a new Coffee College graduate in town, a latte lover armed with just enough knowledge to be dangerous, or at least a nuisance. Thanks to two days of seminars for food writers at the Starbucks Roasting Plant in York, Pa., I can now stroll into your coffee store and ask for a ristretto - which, as you surely know, is the first half of the espresso pour, said by some connoisseurs to provide a more concentrated rush of caffeine than quaffing the whole shot.
FEATURES
By Karol V. Menzie and Karol V. Menzie,SUN STAFF | March 14, 2001
Fennel sounds funny, looks funny and tastes a bit like an old-fashioned candy, but its unmistakable, somewhat licorice-like flavor and crisp texture are seriously pleasing in lots of dishes. It looks, as writer Tamar Haspel comments, "like celery that swallowed a baseball." But it's all edible, from the bulb (as a vegetable, often sauteed, steamed or baked) to the leaves (as an herb, for flavoring soups and broth) to the seeds (as a spice, lending a piquant note to salads, dressings and sausage, among other things)
FEATURES
By Linda Lowe Morris and Linda Lowe Morris,Staff Writer | March 18, 1992
You know the scene all too well: The door of your refrigerator is open and there you stand, peering into its depths. There's food in there, of course. You've got some beets, some chocolate sauce, Parmesan cheese, some milk, some butter, pickles, mayonnaise, capers left over from a party recipe, carrots beginning to grow hair.Minutes pass as you stare at the food -- a blank and somewhat worried look on your face -- while you wish that somehow things would magically rearrange themselves into the ingredients for a meal.
FEATURES
By Karol V. Menzie and Karol V. Menzie,SUN STAFF | March 14, 2001
Fennel sounds funny, looks funny and tastes a bit like an old-fashioned candy, but its unmistakable, somewhat licorice-like flavor and crisp texture are seriously pleasing in lots of dishes. It looks, as writer Tamar Haspel comments, "like celery that swallowed a baseball." But it's all edible, from the bulb (as a vegetable, often sauteed, steamed or baked) to the leaves (as an herb, for flavoring soups and broth) to the seeds (as a spice, lending a piquant note to salads, dressings and sausage, among other things)
FEATURES
By Karol V. Menzie and Karol V. Menzie,Sun Staff Writer | December 21, 1994
Food journalists see an amazing number of cookbooks over the course of the year, and while some are not memorable, a surprising number of them do stand out. So it's hard to pick just two or three favorites, but here are a food writer's choices for three must-haves from the 1994 crop:* "Spur of the Moment Cook," by Perla Meyers (William A. Morrow, $25). I've loved Perla Meyers' practical, humorous approach ever since I discovered her "Art of Seasonal Cooking" back in the '70s.Her new book is exactly the way I cook in the '90s: Keeping a good pantry, buying what's fresh or seasonal, improvising with what's on hand.
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