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By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | November 25, 2012
Many people see Thanksgiving leftovers as too much of a good thing and toss them out. Vinnie Bevivino wants those uneaten castoffs and more — he sees a chance to make some green with them while going green. Bevivino, 31, is the owner of Chesapeake Compost Works, the Baltimore area's latest addition to Maryland's fledgling food recycling industry. His startup began processing scraps and spoilage from local restaurants, supermarkets and institutions about a month ago in a cavernous old warehouse in Curtis Bay. Early next year, if all goes as planned, he hopes to begin selling that unwanted food waste after it's been transformed into dark, rich humus, which the region's gardeners and urban farmers can use to make new food.
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Letter to The Aegis | August 12, 2014
Editor: I was pleased to see Bryna Zumer's article in last week's Aegis about the growing popularity of solar electric power. I was disappointed Harford County Public Schools did not get mentioned, as we were one of the first to install photo-voltaic systems on seven of our schools in 2011.  I have attached information about our systems. More recently, we were recognized for being one of the first school systems in the state to implement a comprehensive commercial composting program at several schools.
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Susan Reimer | November 18, 2013
Table scraps aren't destined for the garbage disposal any more. At least not in Howard County, where executive Ken Ulman spent Friday morning delivering giant green bins to homeowners around Clarksville who signed on to recycle their kitchen waste so the county can turn it into compost at its new Alpha Ridge landfill. "They do this all over the West Coast," said Mr. Ulman, a candidate for the Democratic nomination for lieutenant governor. "There is no reason why we can't do this in Howard County.
NEWS
By Janene Holzberg | April 1, 2014
When Kavita Shukla was 8, she designed a cage cleaner for her pet rabbit, Monet. Removing the cage's tray to empty bunny pellets and food scraps was difficult and messy, and the third-grader was determined to improve on its design. “I came up with this accordion-like device with a shovel and pipe cleaners,” she says, laughing at the memory. “It's so funny to think of that now,” reflects Shukla, who is now 29 and the creative mind behind FreshPaper. Hailed worldwide as a revolutionary product that slows spoilage of fresh fruits and vegetables, her invention is being promoted as having the potential to impact global food waste.
NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel and Andrea F. Siegel,Sun Staff Writer | April 25, 1995
Anne Arundel County opponents of a proposed regional yard waste compost facility in Howard County say the plans are not sound and that they will ask Anne Arundel officials to kill the $5.9 million pact.Members of Anne Arundel's Solid Waste Advisory Committee will present their position tonight in a meeting with public works officials and again Monday when the County Council holds a hearing and votes on the Jessup facility.The agreement among officials from Howard, Anne Arundel and Baltimore counties has been in the works since fall.
BUSINESS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins, The Baltimore Sun | May 13, 2012
Keith Losoya thinks a terrible thing to waste is waste itself. Losoya is the founder and principal partner of Waste Neutral, a small Baltimore firm that helps businesses and institutions compost leftover food that would otherwise go in the trash. The company started consulting in 2008 and began hauling the next year. Another business does the actual composting, but Waste Neutral gives its clients credits so they can get some of the compost back for use wherever they like — in gardens, at urban farms or on other property.
NEWS
By ASCRIBE NEWS SERVICE | February 25, 2001
LEWISBURG, Pa. - Millions of bacteria are busily converting food waste into methane gas and soil nutrients in a pilot project at the Lycoming County landfill to determine if a full-scale plant could cut by up to 70 percent the amount of organic waste being buried. The project is directed by Thomas D. DiStefano, associate professor of civil and environmental engineering at Bucknell University, in collaboration with Richard E. Speece, centennial professor of civil and environmental engineering at Vanderbilt University.
NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel and Andrea F. Siegel,Sun Staff Writer | April 25, 1995
Local opponents of a proposed regional yard waste compost facility in Howard County say the plans are not sound and that they will ask Anne Arundel County officials to kill the $5.9 million pact.Members of the county's Solid Waste Advisory Committee will present their position tonight in a meeting with public works officials and again Monday when the County Council holds a hearing and votes on the Jessup facility.The agreement among officials from Howard, Anne Arundel and Baltimore counties has been in the works since fall.
NEWS
Letter to The Aegis | August 12, 2014
Editor: I was pleased to see Bryna Zumer's article in last week's Aegis about the growing popularity of solar electric power. I was disappointed Harford County Public Schools did not get mentioned, as we were one of the first to install photo-voltaic systems on seven of our schools in 2011.  I have attached information about our systems. More recently, we were recognized for being one of the first school systems in the state to implement a comprehensive commercial composting program at several schools.
EXPLORE
August 13, 2012
The U.S. Army Edgewood Chemical Biological Center (ECBC) and contracting firm SAIC are answering the Army's call for more green technologies to be developed by partnering to create the Tactical Garbage to Energy Refinery (TGER) 2.0 system. To do so, ECBC and SAIC have entered into a cooperative research and development agreement - an agreement between a government agency and a private company - to work together on research and development to speed the commercialization of technology.
NEWS
Susan Reimer | November 18, 2013
Table scraps aren't destined for the garbage disposal any more. At least not in Howard County, where executive Ken Ulman spent Friday morning delivering giant green bins to homeowners around Clarksville who signed on to recycle their kitchen waste so the county can turn it into compost at its new Alpha Ridge landfill. "They do this all over the West Coast," said Mr. Ulman, a candidate for the Democratic nomination for lieutenant governor. "There is no reason why we can't do this in Howard County.
NEWS
By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | April 21, 2013
Howard Hord considers himself a chef of sorts, but the food he works with is a little past its prime. Using moldy melon rinds, orange peels and other castoff fruit and vegetables from some Howard County kitchens, Hord is "cooking" the first batches of plant fertilizer to be produced by the new composting facility at the county's Alpha Ridge landfill in Marriottsville, set to mark its official opening on Monday, Earth Day. Hord, the landfill's operations...
FEATURES
By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | November 25, 2012
Many people see Thanksgiving leftovers as too much of a good thing and toss them out. Vinnie Bevivino wants those uneaten castoffs and more — he sees a chance to make some green with them while going green. Bevivino, 31, is the owner of Chesapeake Compost Works, the Baltimore area's latest addition to Maryland's fledgling food recycling industry. His startup began processing scraps and spoilage from local restaurants, supermarkets and institutions about a month ago in a cavernous old warehouse in Curtis Bay. Early next year, if all goes as planned, he hopes to begin selling that unwanted food waste after it's been transformed into dark, rich humus, which the region's gardeners and urban farmers can use to make new food.
EXPLORE
August 13, 2012
The U.S. Army Edgewood Chemical Biological Center (ECBC) and contracting firm SAIC are answering the Army's call for more green technologies to be developed by partnering to create the Tactical Garbage to Energy Refinery (TGER) 2.0 system. To do so, ECBC and SAIC have entered into a cooperative research and development agreement - an agreement between a government agency and a private company - to work together on research and development to speed the commercialization of technology.
BUSINESS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins, The Baltimore Sun | May 13, 2012
Keith Losoya thinks a terrible thing to waste is waste itself. Losoya is the founder and principal partner of Waste Neutral, a small Baltimore firm that helps businesses and institutions compost leftover food that would otherwise go in the trash. The company started consulting in 2008 and began hauling the next year. Another business does the actual composting, but Waste Neutral gives its clients credits so they can get some of the compost back for use wherever they like — in gardens, at urban farms or on other property.
SPORTS
By Jeff Shain, Tribune Newspapers | January 12, 2012
Back when PGA Tour Commissioner Tim Finchem turned 60, conventional wisdom suggested he would navigate one more difficult TV negotiation before leaving the enterprise for one of his deputies. That was four years ago. The TV deals — a surprising nine years' worth — were signed last fall. Finchem, though, isn't going anywhere. The commissioner on Wednesday accepted a four-year contract extension through June 2016. He would be 69 if he stays on the job for the full hitch.
NEWS
By Janene Holzberg | April 1, 2014
When Kavita Shukla was 8, she designed a cage cleaner for her pet rabbit, Monet. Removing the cage's tray to empty bunny pellets and food scraps was difficult and messy, and the third-grader was determined to improve on its design. “I came up with this accordion-like device with a shovel and pipe cleaners,” she says, laughing at the memory. “It's so funny to think of that now,” reflects Shukla, who is now 29 and the creative mind behind FreshPaper. Hailed worldwide as a revolutionary product that slows spoilage of fresh fruits and vegetables, her invention is being promoted as having the potential to impact global food waste.
NEWS
By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | April 21, 2013
Howard Hord considers himself a chef of sorts, but the food he works with is a little past its prime. Using moldy melon rinds, orange peels and other castoff fruit and vegetables from some Howard County kitchens, Hord is "cooking" the first batches of plant fertilizer to be produced by the new composting facility at the county's Alpha Ridge landfill in Marriottsville, set to mark its official opening on Monday, Earth Day. Hord, the landfill's operations...
NEWS
By ASCRIBE NEWS SERVICE | February 25, 2001
LEWISBURG, Pa. - Millions of bacteria are busily converting food waste into methane gas and soil nutrients in a pilot project at the Lycoming County landfill to determine if a full-scale plant could cut by up to 70 percent the amount of organic waste being buried. The project is directed by Thomas D. DiStefano, associate professor of civil and environmental engineering at Bucknell University, in collaboration with Richard E. Speece, centennial professor of civil and environmental engineering at Vanderbilt University.
NEWS
September 4, 1996
NEWS FLASH! Tons of food in "healthy" school lunches are wasted! As if adults couldn't figure it out by observing generations of youthful preferences, the General Accounting Office has surveyed school cafeteria managers to find out why kids turn their noses up at all that good food Uncle Sam subsidizes.The answer? Kids are more interested in socializing with friends, especially when they feel the food is unappetizing. According to the cafeteria managers, 42 percent of the cooked vegetables served to school children ends up in the trash.
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